Date   
Black-throated Gray and Western Tanager

Edward Henry
 

Illustrating Paul Lehman’s point, the Silk Oaks and trees near them on the east side of Lake 4 at Santee Lakes were popular with several warblers and other birds this morning, including Western Tanager and Black-throated Gray Warbler.

Ed Henry

Re: Silk Oak migrants ; Mount Soledad migrants

Nancy Christensen
 

Coincidentally, Mel and I spent the morning check silk oak trees. The pair on Monument Rd at the TRV headquarters was swarming with birds. The Bird n Butterfly Garden was also very warbler intensive. Nothing rare seen, but lots of birds!

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb

On Apr 25, 2018, at 10:17 AM, "lehman.paul@..." <lehman.paul@...> wrote:

As is the case many a spring, blooming Silk Oak trees are some of the best places to consistently see numbers of migrant warblers and tanagers--at least when there are numbers of migrants present in general (!), which of course ebbs and flows during the migration season. Even a single, isolated, well-blooming Silk Oak can be very good; and these trees are widespread in the county. Particularly consistent in producing migrants is the single Silk Oak along Monument Road in the TRV across the street from the Tijuana River Valley regional park "headquarters" building [also fairly consistent for feral N. Cardinal], the couple trees in the nearby Bird&Butterfly Garden, several sites in residential Point Loma in the Silvergate neighborhood, scattered sites in canyons bordering Balboa Park and in Mission Hills, and the list goes on and on. These trees also produce some vagrant species, and over the past 10 years I've seen late-spring Prothonotary, Parula, Tennessee, Summer Tanager, etc., in them.

A "reminder" that some early mornings there can be an excellent "morning flight" of migrant passerines past and over Mount Soledad in La Jolla. What one wants is for there to be an overnight wind or breeze with any EASTERLY component. Light winds without easterlies are sometimes OK, too, but not nearly as good and sometimes a true failure. Clear or marine-layer overcast doesn't seem to matter, but obviously the top of the "mountain" can't be shrouded in thick fog. The birds start flying by soon after dawn--though sometimes with a bit of a delay--and the show often lasts for about an hour. Almost everything is seen only in flight, so many birders may find it too frustrating, but it is a good ID lesson! Anywhere along the road from just outside the entrance gate to the Mount Soledad Nature Park to next to the actual summit is fair game. Also sometimes westward to the several microwave towers. The birds are mostly flying south to north. Some days, hundreds of warblers, vireos, flycatchers, tanagers, and buntings pass by. Other days it can be a true snorseville. But it IS likely the best place in coastal San Diego County to witness "visible passerine migration" in spring. Also probably not a bad place to try for Black Swift during May. (And I've wondered if it might not be a bad place to look for Broad-winged Hawks in FALL.) There is vagrant potential, though the views are quick, often frustratingly too quick or incomplete, and of course there is no such thing as a "stakeout"!!

--Paul Lehman, San Diego




Silk Oak migrants ; Mount Soledad migrants

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

As is the case many a spring, blooming Silk Oak trees are some of the best places to consistently see numbers of migrant warblers and tanagers--at least when there are numbers of migrants present in general (!), which of course ebbs and flows during the migration season. Even a single, isolated, well-blooming Silk Oak can be very good; and these trees are widespread in the county. Particularly consistent in producing migrants is the single Silk Oak along Monument Road in the TRV across the street from the Tijuana River Valley regional park "headquarters" building [also fairly consistent for feral N. Cardinal], the couple trees in the nearby Bird&Butterfly Garden, several sites in residential Point Loma in the Silvergate neighborhood, scattered sites in canyons bordering Balboa Park and in Mission Hills, and the list goes on and on. These trees also produce some vagrant species, and over the past 10 years I've seen late-spring Prothonotary, Parula, Tennessee, Summer Tanager, etc., in them.

A "reminder" that some early mornings there can be an excellent "morning flight" of migrant passerines past and over Mount Soledad in La Jolla. What one wants is for there to be an overnight wind or breeze with any EASTERLY component. Light winds without easterlies are sometimes OK, too, but not nearly as good and sometimes a true failure. Clear or marine-layer overcast doesn't seem to matter, but obviously the top of the "mountain" can't be shrouded in thick fog. The birds start flying by soon after dawn--though sometimes with a bit of a delay--and the show often lasts for about an hour. Almost everything is seen only in flight, so many birders may find it too frustrating, but it is a good ID lesson!  Anywhere along the road from just outside the entrance gate to the Mount Soledad Nature Park to next to the actual summit is fair game. Also sometimes westward to the several microwave towers. The birds are mostly flying south to north. Some days, hundreds of warblers, vireos, flycatchers, tanagers, and buntings pass by. Other days it can be a true snorseville. But it IS likely the best place in coastal San Diego County to witness "visible passerine migration" in spring. Also probably not a bad place to try for Black Swift during May. (And I've wondered if it might not be a bad place to look for Broad-winged Hawks in FALL.)  There is vagrant potential, though the views are quick, often frustratingly too quick or incomplete, and of course there is no such thing as a "stakeout"!!

--Paul Lehman,  San Diego

Tonight's SDFO Meeting: "Chasing a Desert Apparition: LeConte’s Thrasher,” by Jay Sheppard

Justyn Stahl
 

SDFO Event – Tonight, April 24, 2018 at 6:00 pm is the next meeting of San Diego Field Ornithologists.

 

Program: “Chasing a Desert Apparition: LeConte’s Thrasher,” by Jay Sheppard. LeConte’s Thrasher is a poorly-known and little-studied species found in the hottest and driest deserts of the American Southwest and northwestern Mexico. Mr. Sheppard has spent years studying this enigmatic bird. He will be providing some of the results of his study and some insight into the daily life of this thrasher. A well illustrated presentation of the thrasher’s ecology will be followed by a detailed summary of its general biology. A color-marked thrasher population was studied near Maricopa, California, resulting in a better understanding of their daily lives, dispersal and movements. Other fascinating aspects of this shy bird’s life include information on reproduction, behavior, and vocalizations, as well as feeding and prey preferences. Numerous anecdotes will also be given in this talk. Jay’s monograph on this species is being published by the Western Field Ornithologists and is expected to be out this coming April. Jay is a retired ornithologist of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and now lives in Laurel, Maryland.

 

Next month’s meeting: Tuesday, May 15, same time, same place—we will be meeting on our usual third Tuesday of the month. Program to be announced.

 

Click here for Meeting Details and Map.

If you were a member of SDFO in 2017 – time to renew. 2018 renewals are being accepted. Click here for SDFO membership instructions. Please make sure to include your current email address.

 

Justyn Stahl

San Diego Field Ornithologists

Program Chair

 



City Nature Challenge starts this weekend

Justyn Stahl
 

At midnight, Thursday night, the competition begins!


How many species can YOU photograph this weekend?

The weekend of April 27-30, an international bioblitz competition will be taking place. In order to participate, observations (photo/audio required) must be submitted to iNaturalist, either online at https://www.inaturalist.org/ (which is easy for drag-and-drop photos from camera), or through the app using your phone's camera. All non-captive/cultivated organisms count (butterflies, cacti, parrots, voles, sharks, you name it), but our speciality here is birds, obviously, and we hope to win by showcasing the diversity of species occurring in San Diego County during that period. See below for the official announcement from Lauren Marion Perez, the Citizen Science Manager at the San Diego Natural History Museum.

Every observation helps, even common backyard birds, but unique observations contribute to a high overall species total. We don't need to assign people to specific areas, but consider covering multiple habitat types throughout the weekend. Photograph desert organisms in the morning, then head up into the mountains in the afternoon. Check Mission Trails early for Grasshopper Sparrows, then see how many shorebirds and ducks you can photograph along the San Diego River near Sea World Drive. Kitchen Creek Road could be full of migrants this weekend, and now is a good time to get photos of Gray Vireo and Black-chinned Sparrow (and Mountain Quail?). In between birds, take pictures of plants and insects and mammals. Are you going fishing? Take pictures of what you catch. Consider going out whale watching this weekend. Is there a Great Horned Owl or Common Poorwill singing in your yard? Record it and upload it! Leave your porch light and and look for moths, etc.

You don't have to be able to identify what you've photographed, the greater iNaturalist community will take care of it for you!

Cheers,
Justyn Stahl (iNat username vireolanius)
North Park



---

 

 

 

Partner with The Nat and help San Diego County win the 2018 City Nature Challenge.

 

The 2018 City Nature Challenge is a worldwide competition to see which area can make the most observations of local plants and animals over a 4-day period—and San Diego is participating this year!

 

We're using iNaturalist to tally results for observations made in San Diego County. All wild plants and animals count, even non-native species.

 

The 2018 City Nature Challenge begins Friday, April, 27 at 12 AM PT and ends Monday, April 30 at 11:59 PM PT. Any observation made within the county during the City Nature Challenge will count toward San Diego’s total.

 

Ways you can help:

  • Spread the word with our partner tool kit
    • Reach out to members, volunteers, staff, colleagues, and friends
    • Print and post the flyer at your location
    • Post on social media
    • Send an e-newsletter

 

·       Make observations of your own during the event:

o   Observations down to the species level increases our overall tally

o   Participate via the iNaturalist project page

 

The Nat plans to make a formal announcement of the total number of observations made in San Diego County on Friday, May 4 via social media (Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter), so be sure to follow them on those platforms to see the tallied results.

 

Questions? Email Citizen Science Manager Lauren Marino Perez.

 

Not familiar with iNaturalist? Not to worry, it’s super user-friendly.

All you have to do is:

  1. Download the free iNaturalist app to your Android or iPhone
  2. Join The Nat’s 2018 City Nature Challenge: San Diego iNaturalist project
  3. Take photos or record sounds from April 27-30 to make observations of wild plants and animals in San Diego County (in your backyard, at a park, etc.)
  4. Upload your photos or sounds to iNaturalist
  5. Learn more as the iNaturalist community helps identify your observations

 

The museum will also be hosting a Balboa Park BioBlitz during the City Nature Challenge from Friday, April 27 at 2 PM and ends on Saturday, April 28 at 2 PM. Museum scientists and educators will have tables set up inside and outside the Museum on Saturday, April 28 from 11 AM to 3 PM to help participants get up to speed with the iNaturalist app and answer questions.

 

We look forward to winning with you!

 

 

Lauren Marino Perez

Citizen Science Manager

 

 

We keep collecting so we can keep learning. Come see what we’ve collected in Unshelved: Cool Stuff from Storage.

 

P 619.255.0256
F 619.235.9446
E
lmperez@...

 



Birding offshore San Diego 4-23-18

David Povey
 

Four of us did a loop around local waters out of Mission Bay this morning, Peter Ginsburg, Steve Brad,

Tom Blackman, and I. Still a little slow but some species seem on the increase i.e.; Pink-footed and

Sooty Shearwaters, Black Storm-Petrels, Scripps's Murrelets, Cassin's Auklets, and Red-necked Phalarope.

Other species clearly on the decline i.e.; Black-vented Shearwaters, California and Bonaparte's Gulls.

Good movement of loons, Brant, and scoters, today. All well offshore, mostly beyond 10 miles out.

Notable were two pairs of Scripps's Murrelet that were made up of an adult and a non flying chick. Apparently this

species waste no time once they return here.

La Jolla was very quiet, most of the life was down the Coronado Escarpment and the Nine Mile Bank. So more… like normal.

species list; ( from ocean unless otherwise noted )

Brant   25

Surf Scoter 60

scoter sp.  25

Pacific Loon   150

Common Loon      4

loon sp.  375

Pink-footed Shearwater  7

Sooty Shearwater    15

Black-vented Shearwater  17

Black Storm-Petrel    8

storm-petrel sp.   3

Brandt's Cormorant    3   (one over outer edge of  Nine Mile Bank).

Brown Pelican   52

Black Turnstone  1 (  N. Mission Bay Jetty ).

Surfbird    2   ( S. Mission Bay Jetty  ).

Red-necked Phalarope   250

Scripps's Murrelet   17   ( 2 non flying chicks ).

Cassin's Auklet   14

lg. auklet sp.   2   ( possible Rhinoceros Auklets ).

Heermann's Gull    1    ( Mission Bay Jetty)

Western Gull    75

California Gull   20

Bonaparte's Gull   18

Elegant Tern   14

Royal Tern  2

swallow sp.   1

passerine sp.   2

also noted marine mammals;

Harbor Seal    1

Elephant Seal    2

Guadalupe Fur Seal   2  ( first time I can remember ever seeing two in a day locally).

California Sea Lion     1 (dead)

Bottle-nosed Dolphin  1-2  ( Mission Bay Channel )

Common Dolphin   2 pods   30-40 total

Minke Whale    1

 

Dave Povey

Dulzura

 

p.s. The two Spring BVAS/ Grande trips are May 20th. and June 10th. You can sign on by calling

H & M Sportfishing Sportfishing Landing ( NEW ) at 619 222-1144, or going on line to their website.

This Landing is just to the right of the Point Loma landing that we've used in the past.

The "Early Bird rate" end tomorrow for the May 20th. trip.

Come join us and let's go see what's out there.

 

 

 

Salton Sea (south) - 21 April 2018

Guy McCaskie
 

We (Therese R. Clawson) spent the Saturday, 21 April 2018 (5:45 AM to 5:45 PM) checking a few locations in the Imperial Valley and along the south shore of the Salton Sea. We started the day at Sheldon Reservoir, then moved northward to the area at the intersection of Carter and Fites Roads southwest of Brawley. From here we drove northward to the area around Calipatria, checking for water-birds on Young Reservoir and looking at gulls at the west end of Date Street in Calipatria. We then continued northward to Niland, stopping at the IID Wetlands on the way. In Niland we I birded northward along International Avenue, west along 4th Street, then south along Luna Avenue. From there we drove southwestward by way of Alcott, Pound, Davis and Schrimpf Roads to Morton Bay, then southwestward by way of Garst and Sinclair Roads to the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ. After spending a little time around the Refuge HQ buildings and looking at Rock Hill, we checked for water birds along the shore of the Salton Sea between the west end of Sinclair Road and Obsidian Butte, and from Obsidian Butte to the west end of Young Road, and southwestward to Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge. We then drove southeastward through Westmorland into Brawley. In Brawley we quickly looked at the hummingbird feeders on Willard Avenue and at Cattle Call Park. From here we drove eastward to Dogwood Road and south to near the southeastern corner of El Centro. From there I drove west to Lakeview Golf Course and ended the day at Fig Lagoon.

It was mostly clear, but with cloud-cover in the late afternoon, and with virtually no, and with temperatures ranging from 50 to 95 degrees.

     Species seen and/or heard – Snow Goose (15 – fifteen “cripples” at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Blue-winged Teal (15 – fifteen counted with Cinnamon Teal at the intersection of Pound and Davis Roads)), Cinnamon Teal (150), Northern Shoveler (300), Gadwall (5), Mallard (30), Green-winged Teal (10), Redhead (5),  Ring-necked Duck (2 – two together at Fig Lagoon), Lesser Scaup (1 – one at Sheldon Reservoir), Red-breasted Merganser (1 – one adult male at Obsidian Butte), Ruddy Duck (750), Gambel’s Quail (25), Pied-billed Grebe (5), Eared Grebe (10 – none on the open water of the Salton Sea), Western Grebe (5), Clark’s Grebe (3), Rock Pigeon (50), Eurasian Collared-Dove (150), Inca Dove (15), Common Ground-Dove (30), White-winged Dove (15), Mourning Dove (100), Greater Roadrunner (1), Lesser Nighthawk (1), Vaux’s Swift (2 – two near the intersection of Carter and Fites Roads southwest of Brawley), Black-chinned Hummingbird (10), Anna’s Hummingbird (10), Costa’s Hummingbird (1), Sora (1), Common Gallinule (2), American Coot (350), Black-necked Stilt (75), American Avocet (100), Black-bellied Plover (25), Snowy Plover (2), Semipalmated Plover (30),  Killdeer (15), Whimbrel (75), Long-billed Curlew (6), Marbled Godwit (15), Stilt Sandpiper (60 – at least sixty at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Dunlin (6), Least Sandpiper (500), Pectoral Sandpiper (1 – one adult at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Western Sandpiper (3500), Long-billed Dowitcher (750), Spotted Sandpiper (5), Lesser Yellowlegs (1), Willet (30), Franklin’s Gull (15 – fifteen adults in alternate-plumage with Ring-billed Gulls at the east end of Date Street in Calipatria all had a strong pink wash on their under-parts), Ring-billed Gull (2500), California Gull (10), Herring Gull (1), Gull-billed Tern (150 – about one-hundred twenty, including some on nests, at Rock Hill and about 30 at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Caspian Tern (75), Black Tern (20), Black Skimmer (20 – fifteen at Rock Hill and five at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Common Loon (1 – one in alternate-plumage at Fig Lagoon), Neotropic Cormorant (6 – one at the IID Wetlands and five at Fig Lagoon), Double-crested Cormorant (50), American White Pelican (10), Least Bittern (2), Great Blue Heron (25), Great Egret (10), Snowy Egret (15), Cattle Egret (250), Green Heron (1), Black-crowned Night-Heron (2), White-faced Ibis (350), Turkey Vulture (10), White-tailed Kite (1 – one at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Northern Harrier (3), Sharp-shinned Hawk (1 – one near the intersection of Carter and Fites roads southwest of Brawley), Swainson’s Hawk (2 – two late migrant dark-morph birds between Calipatria and Niland) Red-tailed Hawk (1), Burrowing Owl (10), Belted Kingfisher (1), Gila Woodpecker (1), American Kestrel (25), Western Wood-Pewee (1 – one in the western part of Niland), Western Flycatcher (1), Black Phoebe (15), Say’s Phoebe (2 – a pair at the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ), Vermilion Flycatcher (2 – an adult male and a female together at Lakeview Golf Course), Ash-throated Flycatcher (3), Western Kingbird (30), Loggerhead Shrike (1), Warbling Vireo (6), Common Raven (2), Tree Swallow (300), Northern Rough-winged Swallow (10), Bank Swallow (1 – one with Tree Swallows near the north end of Garst Road), Cliff Swallow (250), Barn Swallow (50), Verdin (10), Marsh Wren (10), Black-tailed Gnatcatcher (2), Hermit Thrush (2), Northern Mockingbird (20), European Starling (250), Phainopepla (1), House Sparrow (75), House Finch (35), Abert’s Towhee (10), Chipping Sparrow (15), Brewer’s Sparrow (6), Savannah Sparrow (1), Song Sparrow (10), White-crowned Sparrow (35), Yellow-breasted Chat (2 – two singing near the intersection of Carter and Fites Roads southwest of Brawley), Yellow-headed Blackbird (1), Western Meadowlark (15), Hooded Oriole (2), Bullock’s Oriole (20), Red-winged Blackbird (350), Bronzed Cowbird (4 – two adult males near the southern end of International Avenue in Niland and an adult male and female together at Lakeview Golf Course), Brown-headed Cowbird (15), Brewer’s Blackbird (30), Great-tailed Grackle (150), Orange-crowned Warbler (15), Nashville Warbler (15), Common Yellowthroat (5), Yellow Warbler (5), Yellow-rumped Warbler (20 – including one “Myrtle Warbler” at the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ), Black-throated Gray Warbler (2), Wilson’s Warbler (6), Western Tanager (2), Black-headed Grosbeak (15) and Lazuli Bunting (2) – 130 species.

 

Guy McCaskie

 

Lesser Nighthawks

Nancy Christensen
 

Out doing some scouting for next weekend’s City Nature Challenge, I visited Rangeland Road this evening (Sunday April 22). Just after sunset, at least 8 Lesser Nighthawks flew in. Initially every bird was headed north, but by 7:30 they were swirling around. I think it probable that they are roosting in or near the Santa Maria Creek that crosses the southern part of the grasslands. Normally I don’t go looking for these birds on Rangeland until late spring, so I was happy to see them!

Other birds present tonight included Cattle Egrets (4), White-faced Ibis (2) and Bald Eagles (2). A pack of 8 coyotes was running together….

 

Nancy Christensen

Ramona

 

miscellanea, and empid status

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

Some miscellanea the past couple days include:

Saturday, April 21:  Lesser Yellowlegs on atypical tidal mudflat habitat at J St.--but no surprise, it soon departed;  3 Brown Boobies off Seacoast Drive, Imperial Beach

Sunday, April 22:  adult Common Tern at Tijuana River mouth a pretty typical arrival date;  3 active Yellow-cr. Night-Heron nests over the bathrooms at the I.B. Sports Park

There have been some recent eBird rarity "alerts" involving single Hammond's Flycatchers, but that species is a very routine migrant during much of April and early May, with several per day not unusual on days with reasonable migrant activity. Perhaps they are flagged because they are empids with a fair misidentification rate? But they are not at all unusual, whereas Dusky Flycatcher is very rare (at best) along the coast, occurs more in May than in April, and is fairly regularly misidentified.

--Paul Lehman,  San Diego

La Mesa Yard birds

Anthony Fife
 

My La Mesa Yard (near Grossmont High School) has been pretty busy!

6 - Black Headed Grosbeak (3 males and 3 female/juveniles) seen eveyday for last week
2- Western Tanagers (males, seen daily week and half)
1- warbling vireo (seen mulitple times over last three days)
1 - pac-slope Flycatcher (nesting)
1- RCK
4- Cal Towhees
1- huttons vireo
100+ - misc birds (Hawks, lesser GF, Amer GF, House Finch, House Sparrow, crows, wrens, and flyovers)

Anthony Fife
La Mesa, Ca

SDFO Meeting announcement: Chasing a Desert Apparition: LeConte’s Thrasher,” by Jay Sheppard

Justyn Stahl
 

SDFO Event – April 24, 2018 at 6:00 pm is the next meeting of San Diego Field Ornithologists.

 

Program: “Chasing a Desert Apparition: LeConte’s Thrasher,” by Jay Sheppard. LeConte’s Thrasher is a poorly-known and little-studied species found in the hottest and driest deserts of the American Southwest and northwestern Mexico. Mr. Sheppard has spent years studying this enigmatic bird. He will be providing some of the results of his study and some insight into the daily life of this thrasher. A well illustrated presentation of the thrasher’s ecology will be followed by a detailed summary of its general biology. A color-marked thrasher population was studied near Maricopa, California, resulting in a better understanding of their daily lives, dispersal and movements. Other fascinating aspects of this shy bird’s life include information on reproduction, behavior, and vocalizations, as well as feeding and prey preferences. Numerous anecdotes will also be given in this talk. Jay’s monograph on this species is being published by the Western Field Ornithologists and is expected to be out this coming April. Jay is a retired ornithologist of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and now lives in Laurel, Maryland.

 

Next month’s meeting: Tuesday, May 15, same time, same place—we will be meeting on our usual third Tuesday of the month. Program to be announced.

 

Click here for Meeting Details and Map.

If you were a member of SDFO in 2017 – time to renew. 2018 renewals are being accepted. Click here for SDFO membership instructions. Please make sure to include your current email address.

 

Justyn Stahl

San Diego Field Ornithologists

Program Chair

 


Black throated gray warbler on Mt Soledad

Ethna Piazza
 

Had a black throated gray warbler in The Summit on Mt. Soledad today at 9:40 am. Also saw the Western Tanager and lesser goldfinches building a nest. 

Anza Borrego Desert Birds April 18,19,and 20, 2018

Susan Smith
 

This past week, on the subject dates, Patti Koger, Eve Martin, Gretchen Nell and myself visited the Anza Borrego State Park (ABSP) desert for some spring migrant birding. We visited Agua Caliente Co. Park, Tamarisk Grove, Yaqui Well, Borrego Springs Resort, Borrego Springs Settling Ponds, Clark's Dry Lake, Roadrunner Club, the ABSP Visitor's Center and a few other quick spots. The most unusual bird, esp rare in spring,  was a VIRGINIA's WARBLER at the WTP Settling Ponds on April 19.  It was in a large mesquite edging the northern border of the pond area, sharing the big dome-shaped mesquite with quite a few other migrating warblers plus a HAMMOND's FLYCATCHER. We were also surprised to see as many as 3 Bell's Vireos and 3 Chats at the WTP Ponds the next day too, and also had fun spotlighting LESSER NIGHTHAWKS at night, having arrived for the summer.  As others have seen recently, we also saw a  WHITE-FACED IBIS at the Borrego Springs Resort and at the Settling Ponds (probably the same one) on the morning of April 20, and a lonely-looking WHIMBREL. 

Overall, with desert counts combined, the most common migrant warblers were Wilson's (41), followed closely by Nashville (39), Black-throated Grey (17) and MacGillivray's (10-14), most at Agua Caliente, but also at the Roadrunner Club, and the ABSP Visitor's Center).  These were followed by Yellow Warbler (11), Hermit (7), Yellow-rumped Audubon (5), Yellowthroat (3), and Chat (3).   Migrating vireos were Warbling (10) and Cassin's (1, continuing at Agua Caliente).  Interesting sparrows  were single Vesper and Brewers at the Settling Ponds.  Three spectacular-looking male Scott's Orioles were adjacent to Tamarisk Grove across Yaqui Pass Rd on the hills around the residence building there. The Long-eared owls have apparently left Tamarisk Grove and it seemed pretty barren of birds and very dry when were there, with the drip  for migrating birds having been turned off. 

eBird lists for the various places we visited have been submitted. 


Susan Smith
Seiurus Biological  Consulting
Del Mar, CA 



--
Susan Smith
Seiurus Biological Consulting
Del Mar, CA

Mission Trails Regional Park

Catherine Zinsky
 

Highlights between yesterday and this morning were:
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Yellow Warbler
Blue Grossbeak
Black-headed Grossbeak
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Blue-Grey Gnatcatcher
Bell's Vireo
Black-chinned Hummingbird
Wilson's Warbler
Black-throated Gray Warbler
Warbling Vireo
Phainopepla
White-Tailed Kite
Greater Road-runner
Grasshopper Sparrow


Happy birding everyone!


--
Waggin' tails,

Catherine


Competitive Obedience Toolbox: www.gettoready.net

Ch Borderfame Soul Train UDX, OM ('Kellan the Felon' a.k.a. 'Sir Barkalot')
OTCH Sporting Fields Summer Solstice, UDX 9, OGM ("Dax", as in "Dax of the Long Tongue" aka 'Sir Lickalot'))
GCH OTCH Sporting Field's Quantum Leap UDX4, OM8 ('Devon' as in 'Devon the Usurper'  aka "Monkey")   
Ch. OTCH Trumagik Step Aside, UDX 20, OGM   (2002 - 2015)
Shorewind Spellbound's Dragon Rider  ("Echo")
 
 

Re: Nazca Booby?

Justyn Stahl
 

A check by Dan Jehl on 11 April was negative. The last eBird record was 6 April, which is the same as listed in the CBRC database, so I assume they have in fact departed.

Justyn Stahl
San Clemente Island

On Fri, Apr 20, 2018 at 1:47 PM, Nancy Christensen <nancy.r.christensen@...> wrote:
A question from an out of town visitor soon to visit.... have the Nazca Boobies departed? I see someone checked both spots (Attu and Grand Caribe) yesterday and did not report them.




Nazca Booby?

Nancy Christensen
 

A question from an out of town visitor soon to visit.... have the Nazca Boobies departed? I see someone checked both spots (Attu and Grand Caribe) yesterday and did not report them.

Am. Restart Lake Hodges

Greg Gillson
 

A first year male American Restart was at Lake Hodges this morning. Yellow  sides, tail base, wing patch with some dark feathers at the lower border of the gray hood and broken eye ring.

A few fair photos to add to eBird checklist later this evening. 

Location:  on trail along lake about 250 yards west of Bernardo Dr. near the footbridge. Over hanging oak tree. I believe this is quite near where one was photographed some time last year. Continuing wintering bird or...???

About 5 Vaux's Swifts. 2 Blue Grosbeaks. A couple of Bell's Vireos. Some Chats. Other typical species totaling 61 species on 3 mile loop. 

eBird list 

Greg Gillson 
Escondido 


--
Greg Gillson
Escondido, California 
sandiegogreg.blogspot.com

Calliope Hummingbirds

Warren J. (Jeff) Clingan
 

4/20/2018     12:05 PM

 

Late yesterday I had the first Calliope Hummingbird of the spring migration at my feeders in San Elijo Hills.  A bright male bird, aggressively chasing away other hummingbirds from his chosen feeder.

 

Jeff Clingan

San Elijo Hills/San Marcos

Bank Swallow, etc.

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

Early Friday morning there were large concentrations of swallows right after dawn at several sites in the TRV, given the cool conditions. Included with the hundreds of birds was a single Bank Swallow near the main Dairymart pond. Also a total of ca. 150 Vaux's Swifts. Given the fair, warming conditions over the next several days, it is assumed these numbers will now dissipate. Also present today was a continuing Reddish Egret at the Tijuana River mouth.

--Paul Lehman, San Diego

Flintkote Ave. 4-20-18

Eric Kallen
 

I hiked up the canyon past the ranger's house this morning.

Highlights

Chats were conspicuous.  Perhaps 10 birds
Lazuli Bunting 
Blue Grosbeak 
BH Grosbeak several heard
Bullock's Oriole 
Cassin's Kingbird 

At Lopez Canyon
Chat 5
Lazuli Bunting 
BH Grosbeak saw 2, numerous calling
Hooded Oriole m
Western Tanager m
Acorn Woodpecker 3

Eric Kallen