Date   
Re: Possible Mountan Plover at Tijuana River Mouth

Gary Nunn
 

A link to eBird checklist with photo of the MOUNTAIN PLOVER at the Tijuana River Mouth, Imperial Beach, seen today by visiting birders noted below.


Gary Nunn,
Pacific Beach.


On Mar 2, 2018, at 5:22 PM, daverdsn@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:

 

Located close to the Pacific Golden Plover at the mouth today.  Photo on e-bird list.  Struck initially by white forehead, plain brown above and unmarked white below.  Longish black bill with black line from bill to eye.  Visiting from UK.  Dave Richardson and Malcolm Hopton

Possible Mountan Plover at Tijuana River Mouth

daverdsn@...
 

Located close to the Pacific Golden Plover at the mouth today.  Photo on e-bird list.  Struck initially by white forehead, plain brown above and unmarked white below.  Longish black bill with black line from bill to eye.  Visiting from UK.  Dave Richardson and Malcolm Hopton

Hooded Merganser's at San Dieguito Park

carlysuko@...
 

Hello,

An adult male and adult female hooded merganser's we're at San Dieguito Park at around 2:30pm today. Both sunning themselves on a rock. In case anyone is interested.

Re: mystery bird in Santee

Eric Kallen
 

I poked around a bit at this spot this morning, 3-2-18.  No mystery bird.

Plumbeous Vireo
Virginia Rail heard
Sora
Common gallinules having a convention
Downy woodpecker
BG Gnat
Tree swallows 
Hermit thrush

Eric Kallen


On Mar 2, 2018, at 2:07 PM, 'Nancy Christensen' nancy.r.christensen@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:

 

Yesterday I posted a checklist from the San Diego River with a recording of a bird call I was unable to identify. People are asking for the results of my query, so here goes…

There are mixed opinions about what this bird might be. Several people believe it is a Gray Catbird, and Trent Stanley has provided spectrographs which sure seem to match the recording I made. A catbird could certainly be found in the reed-clogged habitat of the San Diego River. This sound came from an area with dead reeds that had fallen over, making a solidly-roofed area no more than a foot or so above the water surface. This seems a little tight for a catbird. This bird also called a second sequence about a half hour later, from the same spot, and it seems like this is awfully stationary for a catbird.

Several other people have suggested that the call comes from a Virginia Rail, an alarm call from a bird flushed from the nest. There was certainly a Virginia Rail within a couple of yards, running all over the place, but silent when I could see it. It looked as though the water level had recently risen, so maybe that could be distressing a rail that was setting up a nest. There are several recording on Xeno-Canto of Virginia Rail alarm calls. These calls vary widely in pitch, pattern, etc, so I suppose this call could be a rail alarm call even if it is not a perfect match.

Following a suggestion from Bruce Rideout, I uploaded the call to Xeno-Canto, listing it as a mystery bird. Hopefully someone there will take a look at this and let me know what made that call! For now, it remains a mystery.

 

Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43294100

 

Nancy Christensen

Ramona

 

mystery bird in Santee

Nancy Christensen
 

Yesterday I posted a checklist from the San Diego River with a recording of a bird call I was unable to identify. People are asking for the results of my query, so here goes…

There are mixed opinions about what this bird might be. Several people believe it is a Gray Catbird, and Trent Stanley has provided spectrographs which sure seem to match the recording I made. A catbird could certainly be found in the reed-clogged habitat of the San Diego River. This sound came from an area with dead reeds that had fallen over, making a solidly-roofed area no more than a foot or so above the water surface. This seems a little tight for a catbird. This bird also called a second sequence about a half hour later, from the same spot, and it seems like this is awfully stationary for a catbird.

Several other people have suggested that the call comes from a Virginia Rail, an alarm call from a bird flushed from the nest. There was certainly a Virginia Rail within a couple of yards, running all over the place, but silent when I could see it. It looked as though the water level had recently risen, so maybe that could be distressing a rail that was setting up a nest. There are several recording on Xeno-Canto of Virginia Rail alarm calls. These calls vary widely in pitch, pattern, etc, so I suppose this call could be a rail alarm call even if it is not a perfect match.

Following a suggestion from Bruce Rideout, I uploaded the call to Xeno-Canto, listing it as a mystery bird. Hopefully someone there will take a look at this and let me know what made that call! For now, it remains a mystery.

 

Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43294100

 

Nancy Christensen

Ramona

 

Least bitterns, unknown call

Nancy Christensen
 

I visited the San Diego River today (Thursday March 1st) in Santee – where you park at the Walmart and take the trail down to the bridge over the river. A strange call from the reeds right next to the bridge grabbed my attention. The call was quite loud, kind of like an overgrown gnatcatcher, and close to water level in the reeds. It did not seem to change location throughout my visit, although it was quiet for maybe a half hour.  I did a recording of the call with my phone, which I dropped into my checklist under Virginia Rail (obviously I will move it to whatever species this really is). There was a Virginia Rail, a Sora, Pied-bill Grebes, and Common Gallinules nearby – all of which vocalized at some point while I was there. I would appreciate it if someone could help me ID this call!

The Virginia Rail was running amok, and I saw it dash under the bridge, so I went and stood there hoping it would come out into the open. Instead, right next to the bridge a Least Bittern came out, foraging for food. It had no problem with the camera shutter noise, but as soon as I moved my feet, it was gone. Still standing there, watching a Marsh Wren, I was surprised when the bittern came back out, much closer to me than before. It continued to hunt until a jogger came by, and in a blink it was gone. Once again, it came out as soon as it got quiet again. It went right under the bridge and out the other side, ducking out of sight for another jogger. Just as it was finally getting far enough away from the bridge to get more photos, a second Least Bittern flew in and landed on the head of the first bird. The two flew off together and out of my sight. Neither bird vocalized that I heard.This was the best observation I have had for this species for over 30 years, having the bird in sight for most of 20 minutes, at very close range.

 

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43294100

 

Nancy Christensen

Ramona

 

March 1 Vaux's Swifts in Del Mar/Carmel Valley

Susan Smith
 

Four VAUX'S SWIFTS were feeding above the concrete overpass at the junction of Interstate 5, Hwy 56,  and Carmel Valley Road, in Del Mar today at about 3pm.   It is possible these are overwintering birds (subspecies that breeds in Western North America) which can be found in winter in the San Margarita and San Luis Rey river valleys (acc. to Unit 2004),  tho  I think these are not usual this far south in the county in winter.  I do not recall ever seeing Vaux's in winter in Del Mar before.  Hard to believe these are early migrants showing up 2 months ahead of schedule.  

Susan Smith
Seiurus Biological  Consulting
Del Mar, CA 


Plumbeous and Summer

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

A wintering Plumbeous Vireo, present since about late November, continues on Thursday at Heritage Park in eastern Chula Vista. Often in the pines and deciduous trees near the main building in the park. A couple days ago there was a continuing, wintering female Summer Tanager at Old Trolley Barn Park and bordering neighborhood off Texas Street.

Paul Lehman,  San Diego

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NAB - Winter 2017-2018

Guy McCaskie
 

County Coordinators/Contributors:

The Winter Season (1 December 2017 through 28 February 2018) is ended, and we solicit reports for inclusion in the Southern California Region of NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS. Reports should be arranged with species in the taxonomic order followed by the American Ornithologists Union (Check-List of North American Birds 1998 and all Supplements) and the American Birding Association (7th edition of the ABA Checklist, 2009 revised through the 28th Report). Reports of species included on the California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) review list

http://www.californiabirds.org

must be accompanied by documentation (written description, photographs, etc.).
Similar documentation should also accompany reports of species unusual for
the location or season. Full names, with all initials, should be used in the
reports (this reduces the potential for different observers having the same
initials, and makes it simpler to acknowledge contributors) – John P. Doe in lieu of John Doe.

Reports should be sent to the appropriate County Coordinators (listed below)
or directly to Guy McCaskie. Please hold Reports for this season until after 15 April since I (GMcC) will be out of the country 20 March-16 April 2018. NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS cannot exist without your input.

David Compton (Santa Barbara County)
736 Cieneguitas, # F
Santa Barbara, CA 93110
davcompton60@...  


Tom M. Edell (San Luis Obispo County)
46 8th Street
Cayucos, CA 93430
tedell@...  

Kimball L. Garrett (Los Angeles County)
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
900 Exposition Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90007
kgarrett@...  

Chet McGaugh (Riverside County)

194 W. Broadbent Drive
Riverside, CA 92507
chetmcgaugh@...  

Kelli Heindel-Levinson
1819 Locust Ravine
Bakersfield, Ca 93306
kkheindel@...

Tom and Jo Heindel (Inyo County)
PO Box 400
Big Pine, CA 93513
tjheindel@...  

Adam Searcy (Ventura County)
2420 Balmoral Ct.
Camarillo, CA 93010
serpophaga@...

Alexander E. Koonce (San Bernardino County)
1357 Paige Lane
Redlands, CA 92373-6878
sandy_koonce@redlandsedu  

Guy McCaskie (San Diego and Imperial County)
954 Grove Avenue
Imperial Beach, CA 91932
guymcc@...  

Douglas R. Willick (Orange County)
236 S Batavia St #E
Orange CA 92868
Doug.Willick@...  

We thank you in advance for your time and effort.

Guy McCaskie and Kimball L. Garrett.

 

Pipit not stint

Stan Walens
 

Sorry for the error:
Red throated pipit, not rednecked stint

Stan Walens
San Diego

Fiddler's Cove Brown booby; coastal Swainson's Hawk, Feb 28

Stan Walens
 

Yesterday, late afternoon, I took some out-of-town birders to look for some rarities, mostly in south county.
We dipped on the Greater Pewee and Red-necked Stint.
The female brown booby at Fiddler’s Cove was not visible from Fiddler’s Cove, but we could see it from the vantage point at Attu Avenue. It was roosting on a low buoy just outside/east of the orange-and-white plastic barrier that surrounds the Fiddler’s Cove Marina.

A light-phase Swainson’s Hawk was perched on a lamppost along I-5 south, about a mile or two south of Rte. 94.

Om another matter, the immature golden eagle that Sue Smith photographed yesterday may not be the same one we saw two days ago. Hers was being mobbed by crows; ours was being mobbed by a red-tailed hawk….

Stan Walens, San Diego
Mar 1, 9:00 a..m.

Elegant Tern and “Black Merlin”

Jimmy McMorran
 

Hi Birders,
I encountered my first Elegant Tern of the season on Camp Pendleton today (2/27/18). Pretty much right on time for the earlier arrivals. When I got home the infrequent winter visitor male “Black” Merlin visited its favorite perch in my neighbors yard in Leucadia, CA.

Good Birding,
Jimmy McMorran
Leucadia, CA

Re: Ramona Grasslands, Feb 26

Jimmy McMorran
 

Birders, Stan, et al:
I was a leader on the “Hawk Alley” trip for the SD  Bird Festival on Friday (2/23). We tallied 13 Raptor species in the Ramona Grasslands (not including Turkey Vultures or Western Screech-Owl in our count). We saw several different morphs and ages of Ferruginous and Red-tailed Hawks out there. This could explain Stan’s unknown raptor’s they observed as they are certainly not straight forward ID’s. My fantasy is to see a Rough-legged Hawk in this County.  Oh yeah, on (2/22/18) Brennan Mulrooney and Luke Tiller had a “Black” Merlin, whereas my group had a typical “Taiga” Merlin at the grassland.
Never know what you’ll see out there! It changes minute by minute. 

Good Birding,
Jimmy McMorran
Leucadia,CA


On Feb 26, 2018, at 7:56 PM, Stan Walens stan.walens@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:

 

I went with a phalanx of visiting birders to the Ramona Grasslands..
We got there about noon and stayed till 2:30.
Terrible heat haze.

Hawkwise, besides a plethora of red-tailed hawks of various hues and numerous American kestrels, we had a dark columbarius merlin, a prairie falcon, 2 light-morph and one dark-morph ferruginous hawks, the zone-tailed hawk [yes Nancy, we saw it], two bald eagles and one golden eagle.

We also had two perched hawks that were a very peculiar color—one all mocha-colored, one dark brown with a golden head—both unlike any I’ve ever seen before. I’m totally flummoxed.
Photos are distant and blurry but if you’re interested in trying to help us identify them, email me off-list and I’ll forward them to you.

Later, went to Montecito Way to look for the Harris’s Hawk. It was perched on a telephone pole north of El Paso along Laky Rd., then flew off to destinations unknown.

Stan Walens, San Diego
Feb 26, 2018; 7:50 pm

Ramona Grasslands, Feb 26

Stan Walens
 

I went with a phalanx of visiting birders to the Ramona Grasslands.
We got there about noon and stayed till 2:30.
Terrible heat haze.

Hawkwise, besides a plethora of red-tailed hawks of various hues and numerous American kestrels, we had a dark columbarius merlin, a prairie falcon, 2 light-morph and one dark-morph ferruginous hawks, the zone-tailed hawk [yes Nancy, we saw it], two bald eagles and one golden eagle.

We also had two perched hawks that were a very peculiar color—one all mocha-colored, one dark brown with a golden head—both unlike any I’ve ever seen before. I’m totally flummoxed.
Photos are distant and blurry but if you’re interested in trying to help us identify them, email me off-list and I’ll forward them to you.

Later, went to Montecito Way to look for the Harris’s Hawk. It was perched on a telephone pole north of El Paso along Laky Rd., then flew off to destinations unknown.

Stan Walens, San Diego
Feb 26, 2018; 7:50 pm

Re: Red-necked Grebe

David Povey
 

I got John Sterling's post about 9 a.m. this morning, and as I was only several blocks away, I ran over to see it.

I had missed this bird on my last through check around Shelter isalnd.

I assumed John meant the Tuna Fisherman Memorial, by the play ground. it was not there.

I did see the bird across the channel leading into the Harbor Police, and yacht clubs.

There is a "Rim of the Pacific" art display there, and also the nearby Friendship Bell so perhaps that the memorial he meant.

At any rate the Red-necked Grebe was right in front of the Scripps Oceanograph "Flip" ship.

Dave Povey

Dulzura

 

 

American Redstart - Dos Picos

Nancy Christensen
 

I photographed the American Redstart found over the weekend at Dos Picos County Park, Ramona. It is ranging widely (as they do) in the oaks and willows along the watercourse that parallels the first parking lot, and down to the water’s edge.

 

Nancy Christensen

Ramona

 

six juvenile Heermann's at LJ Shores

Sally M. Gall
 

Today, Monday 2/26, there were six juvenile Heermann's at La Jolla Shores. I'm assuming second year, because I didn't see any for a couple of years after the Rasa Island crash. No adults present today, so they are  off to  Baja to try again?


Sally M. Gall

La Jolla

Brown Thrasher

Nancy Christensen
 

I am responding to enquires about the Brown Thrasher reported from Kit Carson Park. The bird was reported to EBird a couple of weeks ago. Several of us have tried get eyes on this bird, without success so far. A couple of us believe we have heard the bird call, mostly with the smack, but once with the teeyoo call. Barbara Carlson and I tried again this morning, and heard smacking but were unable to actually see it.
Directions.... walk past Sand Lake (now with a sign that says Eagle Scout Lake) and bear towards the left around the end. Keep going on that trail to the clump of sycamores. That is the area. A short way further along there is a junction in the trail, and a trash can. Calls have been heard in this area, and apparently John Sterling believes he had the bird here.
Personally, I am not familiar enough with the species to claim identification by call alone, so I will need to make additional visits.

Red necked grebe

John Sterling
 

At shelter island in bay channel near memorial sculpture.
John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

Continuing birds at Dos Picos and Rangeland Road, Ramona area

Jeremiah Stock
 

I started the morning at Lake Murray, where I was unable to find the previously reported kittiwake.


I then went to Dos Picos County Park and ran in to Barbara Carlson.  We were able to find the continuing White-throated Sparrow under a large oak north of the pond; and the continuing female American Redstart in willows at the west end of the pond.


After Dos Picos, we birded Rangeland Road west of Ramona.  Continuing birds of interest included 2 Bald Eagles, 2 Ferruginous Hawks, and Mountain Bluebirds.  Barbara also spotted a male Vermilion Flycatcher.  The location for the flycatcher is the west side of the road where a line of trees trends to the west and a fence line parallels the trees to the south.  The bird spent most of its time on the fence line. 


Jeremiah Stock

Santee, CA

jscls@...