Date   
No booby 4:00-6:00

Stan Walens
 

Was at Children’s Pool for 2 hours; joined for the last hour by Jim Roberts, who may still be there.
Pretty bad light, and once the New Seaforth left, the only birds were way out to sea.

Will try again tomorrow morning.

A couple of other things:
First of all, kudos [correct Greek pronunciation = koo-dass] to Justyn for reporting the bird in timely fashion, not simply entering it into eBird 12 hours later.
And for the patience to stay there for hours waiting for it to return.
And third, for seeing anything in that terrible light.

I am stuck using my old Bushnell Spacemaster, 20x, because my Leica scope is in the shop for the fourth or fifth time since I bought it.
Design flaws coupled with unconscionably bad repair service [it has been at Leica now for over 3 months!!! and they are unbelievably unresponsive about it] means I have to say:
STAY AWAY FROM LEICA!
Worst customer service experience I have had with any optics company ever.

Next, I cannot identify the bird Justyn saw.
However, it is definitely not the same individual as the masked-type booby seen in Orange Count last week.
IMO, his description more closely fits early second-cycle red-footed booby, which can have a nearly all-white head, white marginal coverts, and mottled brownish-black and white feathers on the upperwing.
Though usually by that time red-footed boobies have pale pink bills.

And an apology for the truncated email I first sent: was dictating it on my new cellphone and somehow sent it incomplete.
The gist is there was a fly-by adult tufted puffin, a very exciting bird. It was maybe 200 yards offshore, just barely outside the seawall at Children’s Pool before it turned westward.
And a lot of birds a mile+ out to sea.

So, tomorrow morning…..

Stan Walens
San Diego

Oops

Stan Walens
 

Trying to deal with new cell phone last email sent accidentally incomplete and unedited with plenty of spelling mistakes. Sorry

Stan Walens.

San Diego

LJ Cove: adult tufted puffin flyby

Stan Walens
 

I am down at children's pool watching birds flying around the new Seaforth. Lots of turns goals and pelicans. An adult tufted puffin flew past a few minutes ago heading north. Turning out to see as it passed children's pool.

Most of the birds are feeling about a mile to a mile and a half offshore. I am using a 20 power Bush Nell space master which cannot see anything more particularly. However I can tell there are pelicans shearwaters goals and turnsin that flock

new Reddish Egret and miscellanea

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

There is a new Reddish Egret in town, this one an immature bird in the San Diego River flood control channel visible from Robb Field Tuesday afternoon. Also today there were 4 male Redheads and a White-faced ibis up at San Dieguito Lagoon in Del Mar. Yesterday, the 19th, there was a singing Swainson's Thrush along the San Diego River in Santee.

Paul Lehman, San Diego


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

Re: Unidentified sulid, La Jolla, 20 June

Justyn Stahl
 

And then disappeared out to sea.

Justyn


On Tue, Jun 20, 2017 at 12:43 PM Justyn Stahl <justyn.stahl@...> wrote:
The bird returned 5 min ago, but still distant.

On Tue, Jun 20, 2017 at 11:37 AM Justyn Stahl <justyn.stahl@...> wrote:
Sorry, yes, by "headlights" I mean marginal coverts. The marginal coverts appeared to be solid white in contrast to the otherwise black back (speckled white) and black upper wing. Unless someone happens to relocate it and/or gets photos I'm happy to let it go.

Justyn


On Tue, Jun 20, 2017 at 10:31 AM Stan Walens <stan.walens@...> wrote:
By headlights, I assume you mean there was some white on the marginal coverts or perhaps the scapulars.
In my experience, subadult red-footed and blue-footed have completely dark marginal coverts, but masked/Nazca in second cycle and beyond has white scapulars that can look like headlights.
The only N.A. sulid that is black-backed and shows white marginal coverts, which start coming in in second cycle, is Northern gannet. Let’s not go there.

That being said, as the white feathers on masked booby wings start to come in during second cycle, they can appear as headlights.
Take a look at Tom Benson’s photos of the subadult masked-type booby from Orange County last week, which does show white “headlights."



Stan Walens
San Diego



On Jun 20, 2017, at 9:39 AM, Justyn Stahl justyn.stahl@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:


About 845, in foggy conditions at La Jolla, I picked up a subadult sulid foraging amongst the kayaks. It was black-backed but with speckling (like a piebald Black-vented Shearwater), white headed, and what struck me was the white "headlights" on the forewing. It was a bit distant/foggy to make out bill color but seemingly was not yellow, more grayish. It flew south out of view. I have no pictures, or much confidence in what it was. It's been 45 minutes and it has not returned.


Justyn Stahl


Re: Unidentified sulid, La Jolla, 20 June

Justyn Stahl
 

The bird returned 5 min ago, but still distant.


On Tue, Jun 20, 2017 at 11:37 AM Justyn Stahl <justyn.stahl@...> wrote:
Sorry, yes, by "headlights" I mean marginal coverts. The marginal coverts appeared to be solid white in contrast to the otherwise black back (speckled white) and black upper wing. Unless someone happens to relocate it and/or gets photos I'm happy to let it go.

Justyn


On Tue, Jun 20, 2017 at 10:31 AM Stan Walens <stan.walens@...> wrote:
By headlights, I assume you mean there was some white on the marginal coverts or perhaps the scapulars.
In my experience, subadult red-footed and blue-footed have completely dark marginal coverts, but masked/Nazca in second cycle and beyond has white scapulars that can look like headlights.
The only N.A. sulid that is black-backed and shows white marginal coverts, which start coming in in second cycle, is Northern gannet. Let’s not go there.

That being said, as the white feathers on masked booby wings start to come in during second cycle, they can appear as headlights.
Take a look at Tom Benson’s photos of the subadult masked-type booby from Orange County last week, which does show white “headlights."



Stan Walens
San Diego



On Jun 20, 2017, at 9:39 AM, Justyn Stahl justyn.stahl@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:


About 845, in foggy conditions at La Jolla, I picked up a subadult sulid foraging amongst the kayaks. It was black-backed but with speckling (like a piebald Black-vented Shearwater), white headed, and what struck me was the white "headlights" on the forewing. It was a bit distant/foggy to make out bill color but seemingly was not yellow, more grayish. It flew south out of view. I have no pictures, or much confidence in what it was. It's been 45 minutes and it has not returned.


Justyn Stahl


Re: Unidentified sulid, La Jolla, 20 June

Justyn Stahl
 

Sorry, yes, by "headlights" I mean marginal coverts. The marginal coverts appeared to be solid white in contrast to the otherwise black back (speckled white) and black upper wing. Unless someone happens to relocate it and/or gets photos I'm happy to let it go.

Justyn


On Tue, Jun 20, 2017 at 10:31 AM Stan Walens <stan.walens@...> wrote:
By headlights, I assume you mean there was some white on the marginal coverts or perhaps the scapulars.
In my experience, subadult red-footed and blue-footed have completely dark marginal coverts, but masked/Nazca in second cycle and beyond has white scapulars that can look like headlights.
The only N.A. sulid that is black-backed and shows white marginal coverts, which start coming in in second cycle, is Northern gannet. Let’s not go there.

That being said, as the white feathers on masked booby wings start to come in during second cycle, they can appear as headlights.
Take a look at Tom Benson’s photos of the subadult masked-type booby from Orange County last week, which does show white “headlights."



Stan Walens
San Diego



On Jun 20, 2017, at 9:39 AM, Justyn Stahl justyn.stahl@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:


About 845, in foggy conditions at La Jolla, I picked up a subadult sulid foraging amongst the kayaks. It was black-backed but with speckling (like a piebald Black-vented Shearwater), white headed, and what struck me was the white "headlights" on the forewing. It was a bit distant/foggy to make out bill color but seemingly was not yellow, more grayish. It flew south out of view. I have no pictures, or much confidence in what it was. It's been 45 minutes and it has not returned.


Justyn Stahl


Re: Unidentified sulid, La Jolla, 20 June

Stan Walens
 

A brief correction to my post a short time ago:

The photos of the June 10 masked-type booby in Orange County are by Jeff Bray; the link to them was in a post by Tom Benson.

That individual, however, has a brown head, and a pretty solidly brown back.

Stan Walens
San Diego


Re: Unidentified sulid, La Jolla, 20 June

Stan Walens
 

By headlights, I assume you mean there was some white on the marginal coverts or perhaps the scapulars.
In my experience, subadult red-footed and blue-footed have completely dark marginal coverts, but masked/Nazca in second cycle and beyond has white scapulars that can look like headlights.
The only N.A. sulid that is black-backed and shows white marginal coverts, which start coming in in second cycle, is Northern gannet. Let’s not go there.

That being said, as the white feathers on masked booby wings start to come in during second cycle, they can appear as headlights.
Take a look at Tom Benson’s photos of the subadult masked-type booby from Orange County last week, which does show white “headlights."



Stan Walens
San Diego



On Jun 20, 2017, at 9:39 AM, Justyn Stahl justyn.stahl@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:


About 845, in foggy conditions at La Jolla, I picked up a subadult sulid foraging amongst the kayaks. It was black-backed but with speckling (like a piebald Black-vented Shearwater), white headed, and what struck me was the white "headlights" on the forewing. It was a bit distant/foggy to make out bill color but seemingly was not yellow, more grayish. It flew south out of view. I have no pictures, or much confidence in what it was. It's been 45 minutes and it has not returned.


Justyn Stahl


Unidentified sulid, La Jolla, 20 June

Justyn Stahl
 

About 845, in foggy conditions at La Jolla, I picked up a subadult sulid foraging amongst the kayaks. It was black-backed but with speckling (like a piebald Black-vented Shearwater), white headed, and what struck me was the white "headlights" on the forewing. It was a bit distant/foggy to make out bill color but seemingly was not yellow, more grayish. It flew south out of view. I have no pictures, or much confidence in what it was. It's been 45 minutes and it has not returned.


Justyn Stahl

SDFO meeting reminder, Ed Henry, “Birds and Other Creatures of Central Thailand”

Justyn Stahl
 

Tonight:

SDFO Event – June 20, 2017 at 6:00 pm is our next meeting of San Diego Field Ornithologists.

Program: Program: Ed Henry will discuss “Birds and Other Creatures of Central Thailand.” In April of 2016 Ed Henry photographed some of the diverse and colorful birds of Kaeng Krachen National Parkand Pak Thale salt ponds, roughly 75 miles from Bangkok,Thailand. He will show us photos and comment on selected species. Ed is Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, San Diego State University and past president of San Diego Audubon Society.

 

Click here for Meeting Details and Map.

If you were a member of SDFO in 2016 – your 2017 membership must be renewed. Click here for SDFO membership instructions.


 

Justyn Stahl
Vice President/Program Chair
SDFO

Red-breasted Merganser at Lake Hodges this morning

Lisa Ruby
 

Hi,

Found a Red-breasted Merganser while out with Terry Hurst at Lake Hodges late this morning. It was swimming around near the area where the new Prickly Pear Cactus plants were recently put in along the Bernardo Bay Trail. eBird showed it as rare for this time of year.

http://tinyurl.com/y9hwxruc


Lisa Ruby
Sabre Springs

more summering waterbirds

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

On Sunday the 18th, an early-morning seawatch at La Jolla was slow, with just 300 Black-vented Shearwaters and 2 small alcid sp. (probably murrelets). Afterwards, we checked Mission Bay and the San Diego River mouth and had the following summering waterbirds:

"BLACK" BRANT: 2 (Crown Point; one has a broken wing)

YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON: 2 (SD River @ Sports Arena bridge; one 2-yr-old and one 1-yr-old)

Semipalmated Plover: 1

Black-bellied Plover: 20

Long-billed Curlew: 5

Whimbrel: 2

Willet: 4

As you can see, the shorebirds today were pretty boring. Returning migrant (presumably failed breeders) Long-biled Curlews, Willets, and Marbled Godwits, plus Wilson's Phalaropes, should start returning any day now...

--Paul Lehman & Barbara Carlson, San Diego

Lesser nighthawk

Nancy Christensen
 

Counted 31 Lesser Nighthawks last evening on Rangeland Road in Ramona. The birds were circling above the pond you cannot see from the road. This is about halfway down Rangeland, where there is a gated dirt road leading to the west. A white sign says Ramona Water District. The first birds arrived shortly after 8pm (sunset was 7:58). I could only count birds above the horizon, and my max count in one sweep was 31. About 8:20 the birds began to disperse, by 8:25 there were only a couple to be seen. I believe this is the third summer I have seen good numbers of Nighthawks at this location.

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb

SDFO Meeting Announcement, Ed Henry, “Birds and Other Creatures of Central Thailand”

Justyn Stahl
 

SDFO Event – June 20, 2017 at 6:00 pm is our next meeting of San Diego Field Ornithologists.

 

Program: Program: Ed Henry will discuss “Birds and Other Creatures of Central Thailand.” In April of 2016 Ed Henry photographed some of the diverse and colorful birds of Kaeng Krachen National Parkand Pak Thale salt ponds, roughly 75 miles from Bangkok,Thailand. He will show us photos and comment on selected species. Ed is Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, San Diego State University and past president of San Diego Audubon Society.

 

Click here for Meeting Details and Map.

If you were a member of SDFO in 2016 – your 2017 membership must be renewed. Click here for SDFO membership instructions.


 

Justyn Stahl
Vice President/Program Chair
SDFO

greater yellowlegs san luis rey oops

stevan brad
 

make that thursday 6/15    not sunday   


steve brad

leucadia

re paul lehmans summering shorebirds

stevan brad
 

thanks for the informative post Paul!

on Sunday I was surprised to see 3 Greater Yellowlegs on the San Luis Rey river  Oceanside near the Benet Bridge ( about 5 miles from the coast)   I ebirded  it just to see if  was flagged and as it wasnt just let it go

Lots of nice habitat along the river now with the river flowing again out to the sea  after not for about 7 years 


steve brad

leucadia

summering shorebirds, Swainson's Thrushes

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

On Saturday morning, June 17th, 2 SWAINSON'S THRUSHES were singing on the east side of the road at Dairymart pond area in the TRV, where rare in summer but where have occurred during some previous summers. A check of various tidal mudflat and other areas in and around San Diego Bay turned up the following summering non-breeding waterbirds:

Surf Scoter: 7

Semipalmated Plover: 9

Black-bellied Plover: 26

Long-billed Curlew: 11

Whimbrel: 7

Marbled Godwit: 43

Willet: 48

RUDDY TURNSTONE: 4

RED KNOT: 45 (good count for summer; several in alternate plumage; most at Emory Cove)

DUNLIN: 1 (basic plumage; Emory Cove; very rare in summer)

Western Sandpiper: 3

Short-billed Dowitcher: 45 (several in alternate plumage)

Greater Yellowlegs: 5


--Paul Lehman & Barbara Carlson, San Diego

Re: New file uploaded to SanDiegoRegionBirding

Mike H Wittmer <mikewittmer0582@...>
 

Is SanDiegoRegionBirding still active?  I haven’t gotten any updates on sightings in a week.  I know there were changes due to complications with the yahoo group site.  Do you have any suggestions?


Mike Wittmer

On Jun 11, 2017, at 5:26 PM, SanDiegoRegionBirding@... wrote:


Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the SanDiegoRegionBirding
group.

File : /Untitled 3x.wav
Uploaded by : mfarnesi <mfarnesi@...>
Description : Unknown bird song (6-10 at San Diego river near old mission dam)

You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/SanDiegoRegionBirding/files/Untitled%203x.wav

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398

Regards,

mfarnesi <mfarnesi@...>


results of 12 June 2017 San Elijo monthly bird count

Robert Patton
 

Thanks to 10 participants for conducting the 12 June 2017 San Elijo Lagoon monthly bird count: Steve Brad (seawatch; Nature Center); Bradley Nussbaum, Elizabeth Venrick (Pole Rd); Gretchen Nell, Don Johnson, Patti Koger (CBS= Rios to freeway); Kathy Aldern, Gail DeLalla (EBS = La Orilla to Sta Inez); Robert Patton (Beach, West Basin; EBNW = dike; EBNE = Escondido Cr; Cardiff Cove); Steve Perry (EBE = Stonebridge Mesa).

 

As is typical in June with most shorebirds & waterfowl breeding elsewhere, species diversity was low.  However, fledglings of several landbird species were noted.

 

72 species were recorded: black-vented shearwater, brown pelican, double-crested cormorant, Brandt’s cormorant, great blue heron, great egret, snowy egret, black-crowned night-heron, white-faced ibis, mallard, gadwall, osprey, white-tailed kite, Cooper’s hawk, red-shouldered hawk, red-tailed hawk, American kestrel, California quail, Ridgway’s rail, killdeer, black-necked stilt, American avocet, Heermann’s gull, California gull, western gull, Forster’s tern, rock pigeon, Eurasian collared-dove, mourning dove, greater roadrunner, white-throated swift, Anna’s hummingbird, Allen’s hummingbird, Allen’s/rufous hummingbird sp., Nuttall’s woodpecker, downy woodpecker, Pacific-slope flycatcher, black phoebe, Say’s phoebe, Cassin’s kingbird, tree swallow, rough-winged swallow, cliff swallow, barn swallow, California scrub jay, American crow, common raven, bushtit, Bewick’s wren, house wren, marsh wren, California gnatcatcher, wrentit, northern mockingbird, California thrasher, European starling, Hutton’s vireo, orange-crowned warbler, yellow warbler, common yellowthroat, yellow-breasted chat, black-headed grosbeak, spotted towhee, California towhee, Belding’s savannah sparrow, song sparrow, red-winged blackbird, brown-headed cowbird, hooded oriole, house finch, lesser goldfinch, house sparrow, scaly-breasted munia.

 

The next monthly bird count will be 10 July. 

R. Patton

San Diego, CA