Date   
Penasquitos Lagoon Red-necked Grebe continues, seen preening on dry land, Sunday June 12

Susan Smith
 

The continuing RED-NECKED GREBE was seen swimming in the  northern arm of the slough about 40 yards east of the Torrey Pines Beach (PCH) bridge when I arrived there at about 11:40 am today, and to my surprise, it then proceeded to haul itself up on a sandbar, where it stood preening for about 20 minutes, before tipping over and belly sliding to the water,  penguin-like, at about noon. It then swam upstream to the northeast, before paddling behind the  peninsula sand bank that juts out there, disappearing from view at about 12:15.  The tide was low, and the river mouth was open but shallow. While the bird was  on land (an occurrence that is definitely not common  with this species), I watched it preen and pluck at its chest and flank feathers---they are supposed to do this and swallow feathers to ease the passage of fish bones, I read.  While preening, every once in a while, it would  raise and flap its wings and preen its wing feathers, which looked to be very ratty,  and puny like the bird was undergoing wing molt.  I wonder if this is the reason it has not left...it looked like the wing feathering was not developed enough for flight. RN grebes are supposed to molt primaries and secondaries at the same time, so are flightless at this stage. But  I thought that this was the wrong time for this molt....can anyone shed some light on this?  Has it been determined that this bird is in Alternate 1 plumage or Definitive Alternate plumage? The head tufts seem to be pretty well developed.  Sue

Susan Smith
Seiurus Biological  Consulting
Del Mar, CA 


Clark's Nutcracker seen briefly near Cuyamaca Peak

Aaron Polichar
 

Hello all,


Today June 12, while hiking Lookout Fire Road to Cuyamaca Peak and back down, I briefly saw a Clark's Nutcracker fly to a dead snag, apparently from the east, about 3/4 of a mile down the road from the peak, at around 4:30-5:00 PM. Soon after I got my bins on it it flew away, and I was unable to locate it again.


About an hour earlier on the way up, I had seen two Dusky Flycatchers flying around some cedar and oak trees about 1/3 mile down the fire road from the summit. I also saw 3 Purple Martins at different locations.


Aaron Polichar

Scripps Ranch, San Diego

beldingsparrow@...

San Diego Pelagic, Manx Shearwater, Red-billed tropicbird, Craveri's Murrelets

David Povey
 

The Sunday June 12, 2016 Buena Vista and Grande pelagic was met with mild seas and really good numbers of birds.

Trip highlights were a MANX SHEARWATER seen late in the day and photographed among a large raft of Sooty Shearwaters,

at the far north end of the Nine Mile Bank. This at about 14 n.m. west of Ocean Beach.

A RED-BILLED TROPICBIRD was near the "182 " on the Thirty Mile Bank, at 23 n.m. west of Point Loma.

Two CRAVERI'S MURRLETS  were found just on the inner edge the Nine Mile Bank, in the morning, at 7 n.m. s.w. of the Point

Loma.

We had large numbers of Sooty Shearwaters, and Elegant Terns all day, and all distances.

No large raft(s) of storm-petrels was found, though we had several smaller rafts of Black Storm-Petrels (25-200) with a small 

number of ASHY STORM-PETRELS (1-6 )with some groups, once we were beyond 14-15 n.m.

Hugh quantities of bait fish (anchovy) were out on the outer edge of the Nine Mile Bank.  Captain James Mc Daniels mentioned

that the mass seen on the Grande's fish meters to be as large as he'd ever seen. (10-12 n.m.)

Sea Surface Temperatures remain right about were the been all winter and spring 65-66 F.

Partial species list;

Pacific Loon   1   (Ballast Point, S.D.Bay)

Pink-footed Shearwater     9    ( rather low? )

Sooty Shearwater   3200+  ( maybe under estimated )

MANX SHEARWATER   1  ( out of season here? ) photos

Black-vented Shearwater   190

Ashy Storm-Petrel    30

Black Storm-Petrel    600+

RED-BILLED TROPICBIRD   1  photos

Brown Booby     1  Imm.  ( very low by recent standards )

Brown Pelican  110+  ( many well offshore )

Brandt's Cormorant  80  ( again well offshore )

Double-crested Cormorant  6   ( some to Nine Mile Bank )

Scripps's Murrelet    2

CRAVERI'S MURRELET  2   ( continues early summer arrivals of last two years)  photos

Cassin's Auklets    15

Least Tern    9

Elegant Tern     1800

Western Gull   190

Heermann's Gull  60  ( all adults )

 

Humpback Whale   2-3,   Minke Whale 1.    Whale sp. 3-5  , Thousands of Common Dolphin ( some i.d. as Long- beaked  ).

 

Dave Povey

Dulzura

 

 

Red-necked Grebe This Morning

Kathy
 

Well I know one reason why the Red-necked Grebe in Del Mar has been so difficult to see.  I saw it about 7:15 this morning in a narrow tributary directly west of the train tracks while I was on the Coaster.  It was a rather fleeting look, to say the least, though the train was not at its top speed due to track work.    This location was far southeast of the 101 and parking area and would not be able to be seen anywhere but the train.

Kathy Aldern
Leucadia


Re: Red-necked Grebe This Morning

Steve Perry
 

I normally see it from the Carmel Valley Road parking lot in the evenings, foraging along the very west edge of the lagoon, right along the base of the PCH embankment. There are some mussels/clams along there (the ones that periodically spit water) and it goes back and forth chasing small creatures in the water. I have some video of it doing this with 2 snowy egrets taking advantage of the disturbed prey as it flees the grebe. I'll review these videos and photos and try to determine the plumage state, too.

Steve Perry
Solana Beach
--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 6/14/16, ScottA1124@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:

Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Red-necked Grebe This Morning
To: SanDiegoRegionBirding@...
Date: Tuesday, June 14, 2016, 8:14 AM


 









Well I know one reason why the Red-necked Grebe in
Del Mar has been so difficult to see.  I saw it about 7:15
this morning in a narrow tributary directly west of the
train tracks while I was on the Coaster.  It was a rather
fleeting look, to say the least, though the train was not at
its top speed due to track work.    This location was far
southeast of the 101 and parking area and would not be able
to be seen anywhere but the train.

Kathy Aldern
Leucadia











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Red-necked grebe

Nancy Christensen
 

As one of the last remaining people in the county to see this bird, I am currently watching the red-necked grebe. For awhile it was foraging alongside a red-breasted merganser. It came from the southern arm of the lagoon and is now in the northern arm. It has stayed within a foot of the shore the entire time and approached quite closely.

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb

grebe photos

Nancy Christensen
 

The link below leads to an album with photos of the Red-necked Grebe. As Sue Smith said – the wings are in very poor condition and this bird may not be able to sustain flight. It doesn’t look to me as though it molted though, it’s as though each feather has turned into a streamer. If I remember correctly, this bird has been around for most of a month now, but there does not seem to be any new feathers growing in…

 

https://picasaweb.google.com/108086363030545548636/BIRDS2016?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCL_VndDEt_Ln4QE&feat=directlink

 

Nancy Christensen

Ramona

 

American Golden-Plover at Lindbergh Field

Elizabeth Copper
 

Unchaseable but interesting was an apparent female American Golden-Plover in alternate plumage that landed briefly in the least tern nesting area at Lindbergh Field on 13 June.

 

Elizabeth Copper

Coronado

White-winged Dove in North Park

Mark Stratton
 

Hi all,

Coming home from the store this evening, there was a White-winged Dove on the wire with 2 Mourning Doves.  It was a couple of blocks east of 32nd and Thorne.  Never seen them out this way before so wasn't sure if it was worth reporting.

Mark Stratton
North Park

Ridgeway's rails - San Elijo

Carina Graham
 

Cary Vanettes and I are currently under the 5 fwy at the San Elijo Lagoon. We were surprised to see a Ridgway's rail stalking across the mud flat. When it reached the edge of the tall grass/reeds, another came out and they mated. We both had great views of both rails. We ruled out Virginia because the chest and neck were duller orange, and the striping on the flanks was light gray rather than dark grey or black. No grey on cheeks. The rails also seemed too large to be Virginias. Happy Father's Day to all you dads out there! Carina Graham Oceanside

Reminder – SDFO Monthly Meeting Announcement – Gary Nunn

Gary Nunn
 

SDFO Event – Tuesday, June 21st, 2016 at 6:00 pm is our next meeting of San Diego Field Ornithologists.

In addition to the presentation announced below we will be conducting our annual election of officers at the June 21, 2016 meeting.

ETHIOPIA – BIRDING THE ROOF OF AFRICA

Presented by Gary Nunn, Pacific Beach, California.

Ethiopia is a country of natural extremes from towering high mountain plateaus to lowland desert savannas. Located at the nexus of Africa’s rift valley and influences from the Palearctic regions the country possesses an enormous diversity of birds. This presentation will take viewers on a 4000 kilometer tour of Ethiopia’s top birding destinations highlighting the enigmatic much-sought-after birds found there and the situations one finds oneself in pursuing them. Colorful, secretive, rare and difficult to identify birds will be discussed ranging from the astonishing Prince Ruspoli’s Turaco, to the inquisitive Stresemann’s Bush-Crows, as well as little known species such as the Scarce Swift. Over a period of 20 days, in April-May 2016, Gary Nunn, and a team of other birders and guides, together found a total of 536 bird species including all seventeen endemics occurring in Ethiopia.

Gary Nunn hails from England originally, where he grew up birding from a young age chasing rarities in the crucible of twitching – the county of Norfolk. He holds a BSc. in Biological Sciences, and PhD. in Genetics, both from the University of Nottingham, England. Gary completed research into the evolution and phylogeny of seabirds while he was a Chapman Postdoctoral Fellow at the American Museum of Natural History, and a Molecular Evolution Postdoctoral Fellow at the Smithsonian Institution. He is now a professional scientist working in the life sciences industry in San Diego, California. He has traveled to more than thirty countries worldwide birding but also has a great interest in “patch birding”. Gary currently resides with his wife and young family in Pacific Beach, San Diego County, California which, he notes, is exactly halfway between his two favorite birding patches Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery and Point La Jolla.
SDFO welcomes members and non-members to our events.  Please feel free to attend, listen to a few talks, and see if you are interested in joining.

Gary Nunn
San Diego Field Ornithologists
President & Program Chair

Re: Ridgeway's rails - San Elijo

Brennan Mulrooney
 

For those interested, San Elijo Lagoon is a good place to see Ridgway's Rail right now. They are currently present in historically high numbers. They can be found on both sides of the freeway, but they are easier to see on the west side. They have chicks right now, so watch out for little imposter Black Rails (there are no Black Rails there). They are easiest to see at lower tides when they can be seen running around in the open, gathering crabs for their chicks. There are a few Virginia Rails in the marsh as well, but they are on the east side and much more difficult to observe.


Please remember, this is an endangered species (federal as well as state) and it is therefore illegal to broadcast recordings of their calls without a permit. Fortunately, as Carina described, it's not really necessary at this time.


Brennan Mulrooney

Santee, CA





From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@... on behalf of goldenslippersbirding@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding]
Sent: Sunday, June 19, 2016 11:27 AM
To: SanDiegoRegionBirding@...
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Ridgeway&#39;s rails - San Elijo
 
 

Cary Vanettes and I are currently under the 5 fwy at the San Elijo Lagoon. We were surprised to see a Ridgway's rail stalking across the mud flat. When it reached the edge of the tall grass/reeds, another came out and they mated. We both had great views of both rails. We ruled out Virginia because the chest and neck were duller orange, and the striping on the flanks was light gray rather than dark grey or black. No grey on cheeks. The rails also seemed too large to be Virginias. Happy Father's Day to all you dads out there! Carina Graham Oceanside

Laughing Gull at J st. Marina mudflat

David Povey
 

A sub adult Laughing Gull was with the California Gull flock at J st. marine sandbar about 11 a.m. this morning.

The bird looks pretty bedraggled, as do the Cal. Gulls. Guess a diet of potato chips or what every  they fest on in the park isn't great for normal feather molt.

This is my second post so forgive this if the other comes in from my cell phone.

Dave Povey

Dulzura (west of the fires so far)

La Jolla & SD River mouth

Paul Lehman
 

Early-morning Thursday, a two-hour seawatch at La Jolla was mediocre, highlighted by a group of 3 BROWN BOOBIES headed north. Though still regular, booby numbers seem to be on the DECLINE off San Diego County and in some other parts of California since peaking around one to two years ago. Definitely bears watching! About 250 Black-vented Shearwaters, but only 3 Sooties and a couple Black Storm-Petrels. On Tuesday at the San Diego River/flood control channel area, the continuing, summering, female-type BUFFLEHEAD continued from Robb Field, and the off-and-on, seasonal pair of YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS (one bird has orangey-red legs, the other yellowish legs) that have been present a number of years were in the channel opposite Sea World.

--Paul Lehman, San Diego

vireos at Dos Picos

Nancy Christensen
 

This morning (June 23) I birded at Dos Picos County Park (Ramona), and found at least 2 vireos. One was definitely singing the Warbling Vireo song, the second one had shorter phrasing. This bird was very aggressive towards all other birds, actively chasing everything out of whatever tree it perched in. This bird was brightly marked, by which I mean that it was higher contrast than Warbling Vireos usually are, and I toyed with the idea that it could be a red-eyed vireo. I finally decided it must also be a Warbling Vireo – the two birds did interact. I have put photos in the Ebird checklist of each of the two birds, and here is a link to those photos:

 

https://picasaweb.google.com/108086363030545548636/BIRDS2016?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCL_VndDEt_Ln4QE&feat=directlink

 

If anyone sees anything different, please let me know!

 

There was also a pair of Dark-eyed Juncos feeding a fledgling, which surprised me as well.

 

Nancy Christensen

Ramona

 

summering and arriving shorebirds, 3 Reddish Egrets

Paul Lehman
 

Spent a few hours Friday morning, the 24th, poking around south San Diego Bay and the TRV. I usually do a count of over-summering shorebirds here every year in mid-June, but I was away this year so have now done it a bit late--which means some "southbound" migrant Willets, Long-billed Curlews, and possibly Marbled Godwits have already returned, ditto probably a few Greater Yellowlegs and--as of yesterday--breeding-plumaged Western Sandpipers. These have now mixed in with the over-summering, mostly basic-plumaged birds. So, with that caveat in mind, waterbird totals included:

Surf Scoter: 6

REDDISH EGRET: 3 (all adults; at J St., Emory Cove, and Delta Beach; but they move around, so hard to keep track, and they all look pretty similar...)

Black-bellied Plover: 49

Semipalmated Plover: 7

Greater Yellowlegs: 11

Willet: 175

Long-billed Curlew: 17

Whimbrel: 7

Marbled Godwit: 48

RED KNOT: 12 (Emory Cove)

Western Sandpiper: 35

Short-billed Dowitcher: 13 (low)

--Paul Lehman, San Diego

Possible Common Nighthawk in Rancho Bernardo

Mark Stratton
 

Good morning,

As I arrived at work this morning, just before 5:30 am, I heard what I immediately thought was the buzz call of Common Nighthawk.  Looking up, I did see one single nighthawk flying around overhead.  I was near the corner of Rancho San Berardo and Willow Ct.  The bird eventually headed towards a large hilsidel to the Northwest of this intersection.  I would not be able to ID a Common by sight and don't know if anyone can, but I have seen and heard them many many times in Florida when I go there.  I did try to send a text to the text group but am not sure if it went through.

Mark Stratton
North Park

Re: Possible Common Nighthawk in Rancho Bernardo

Mark Stratton
 

I just got off the phone with Jan N. and actually came home just now and jumped on the computer to make the street correction, thank you Tim.  The intersection is in fact Camino San Bernardo and Willow Ct in Rancho Bernardo.  

Mark Stratton
North Park

On Sat, Jun 25, 2016 at 11:03 AM, Timothy Burr <tburr@...> wrote:
Hi Mark,
Thanks for this.  Unfortunately, I didn't hear my "Group Me" alert when it came thru.  For folks wanting to go back to your area in hopes of a repeat performance either tonite or tomorrow morning, you might want to correct one of your street references.  I believe it should be "Camino San Bernardo and Willow Ct" not "Rancho San Bernardo".
Thanks again for the heads-up.
Best, Tim

On Jun 25, 2016, at 5:47 AM, Mark Stratton zostropz@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] wrote:

 

Good morning,

As I arrived at work this morning, just before 5:30 am, I heard what I immediately thought was the buzz call of Common Nighthawk.  Looking up, I did see one single nighthawk flying around overhead.  I was near the corner of Rancho San Berardo and Willow Ct.  The bird eventually headed towards a large hilsidel to the Northwest of this intersection.  I would not be able to ID a Common by sight and don't know if anyone can, but I have seen and heard them many many times in Florida when I go there.  I did try to send a text to the text group but am not sure if it went through.

Mark Stratton
North Park


"The Good Thing About Science is that it is True Whether or Not You Believe in it."  Neil deGrasse Tyson


Frigatebird

Nancy Christensen
 

12:47 over bait dock in San Diego bay

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb

Re: Frigatebird

Justyn Stahl
 

Nancy's aboard the Hornblower and suggests the best chance would be from Point Loma (east side of FRNC?).

Justyn

On Sat, Jun 25, 2016 at 12:47 PM, Nancy Christensen nancy.r.christensen@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:
 

12:47 over bait dock in San Diego bay

Nancy Christensen
Ramona

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb