Date   

No birds; ocean deoxygenation

Stan Walens
 

I have no birds to report in this post.
Will be at the Cove tomorrow while the real birders in town are on the pelagic trip.
I hope they find some great things.

But there’s a very relevant article on this week’s HuffingtonPost website about ocean deoxygenation.
It’s very scary. Worth reading and following up upon.
Estimates are that the ocean off San Diego may be dead within 15–25 years, and that much of the Pacific Ocean, both north and south of the Equator, will be dead.

Stan Walens
San Diego


Borrego Springs Winds and Migrants

W Terry Hunefeld
 

When I awoke at 5 AM this morning I could hear my palm trees groaning and bending.  With winds at Rams Hill of 30-35mph gusting to 45mph, I decided to drop down to the valley where things are generally a bit tamer.

The front gates to The Roadrunner Club were closed at 5:50 a.m. so I drove around to The Springs Resort (the new complex and RV park to the north of The Roadrunner Club). 

While walking along the lake in The Springs at sunrise, Black-headed Grosbeaks and Orioles were singing.  Wow! Every Palo Verde along the west side of the lake contained migrating passerines. 

The wind calmed to 10-20 mph for a half hour enabling me to find quite a nice migration list of 50 warblers. One tree alone contained 6 Bullock's Orioles. 

More surprising was the east side of the lake where a flock of Spotted Sandpipers bobbed along the bank, all in breeding plumage. I have ever seen 11 Spotted Sandpipers together before.


Terry Hunefeld
Borrego Springs, California
Dictated to Siri via iPhone. Please forgive her typos. 


San Elijo Lagoon Visitor Center Loop 4/30/16

carib_boo
 

Started the weekend off right with a slow birding stroll around the San Elijo Lagoon Visitor Center loop trail for a lovely mix of resident and migratory species:

American coot

American crow

Anna's hummingbird

Bewick's wren

Black-headed grosbeak

Black phoebe

Brown-headed cowbird

Bushtit

California towhee

Cassin's kingbird

Common yellowthroat

Double-crested cormorant

Hooded oriole

Mallard

Mourning dove

Northern rough-winged swallow

Red-shouldered hawk

Rufous hummingbird

Song sparrow

Sora

Whimbrel

White-throated swift

Wilson's warbler

Yellow warbler


Betsy Miller Vixie

Olivenhain


Re: Gray Thrasher news

C K Staurovsky
 

Mark,
All due respect, but comparing the Xantus record with the Gray thrasher is apples to oranges. North American hummingbirds have a strongly documented history of long distance migration capability, as well as widespread sources of food continent wide. A Xantus, although clearly not well documented way out of range, has the tools to do so and going along for a long "road trip" with other migrating hummingbird species up the Baja pennisula and thousands of miles further is plausible for the above reasons. Also, there is little documentation of NA hummingbirds as caged species, probably due to metabolic requirements, stress, and lack of song repertoire. So it is extremely unlikely a Xantus would be caged, brought to Canada alive and released/escape.
Mimids on the other hand, are a significant portion of caged species, and very easily transported from mid-Baja to San Diego. As far as migration, Mimids generally, and a Gray Thrasher particularly is much less likely and suited to go too far out of range. Range expansions are slow and in extremely short distances relative to size of range. Add in the complete lack of migratory evidence to suggest a stray from the relatively short distance of northern Baja to here and the niche specific requirements of thrasher species in general and the idea of an artificially introduced bird is extremely plausible. Keep in mind that the bird would not have to be captive for even 24 hours to reach San Diego, thereby eliminating visible signs of captivity. (I do recall there were some possible signs none the less (missing toe(s) or something like that??). I am certain many will take issue with my thoughts on the whole matter, but that's the fun in it as far as I'm concerned. All other issues aside, it was/is a very cool find/sighting, it put a big charge into a lot of folks, and was certainly worthy of speculation and consideration as the CBRC did. The fact that it has been not accepted into the "official" records doesn't really take away from that in my mind. Of course, many would disagree, particularly those wanting to "list" it. Who knows, the whole event might be the beginning of a series of Gray thrasher sightings in the Lower 48 and the talk will turn to mechanisms of range expansion. Cheers!
 
Chris Smith
El Cajon

"Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything." WS



From: "Mark Stratton zostropz@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding]"
To: Justyn Stahl
Cc: SanDiegoRegionBirding&RBA
Sent: Friday, April 29, 2016 4:59 PM
Subject: Re: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Gray Thrasher news

 
So us as observers how do we challenge this? The Xantus's  hummingbird with the same range in Canada is accepted but this one a couple hundred miles out of range isn't I think there is a problem there. The Cardinal I understand but this is a bird that if it was released probably would stay in its area and yet one found its way up here. This bird had nice feathers not cage feathers and yet it's not accepted this bird should be accepted. Mark Stratton San Diego
On Apr 29, 2016 4:51 PM, "Justyn Stahl justyn.stahl@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding]" <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:
 
San Diego Birders,

Per the forwarded message below, the California Bird Records Committee has voted (after 2 rounds of deliberation) not to accept the Gray Thrasher (Famosa Slough, 2 August 2015) due to concerns regarding this individual's natural occurrence.

Justyn Stahl

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Kimball Garrett kgarrett@... [CALBIRDS] <CALBIRDS-noreply@...>
Date: Fri, Apr 29, 2016 at 1:43 PM
Subject: [CALBIRDS] Recent CBRC news
To: "CALBIRDS@..." <CALBIRDS@...>


 
Birders,
 
The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) recently completed its second round of deliberations on the Gray Thrasher that appeared at Famosa Slough, San Diego County on 2 August 2016. The record was not accepted due to questionable natural occurrence, although this species may still be added to the “Supplemental List.”  The state list currently remains at 662 species.
 
Two potential additions to the California list are being considered by the CBRC:  Two records of  Purple Sandpiper (at Salt Creek, north end of the Salton Sea, Riverside Co. 25 March to 17 April 2016, and at Kehoe Beach, Pt. Reyes National Seashore, Marin Co. 25 April 2016) have been officially submitted to the CBRC, but have not yet circulated; the Committee will consider whether these records might represent the same individual.  A report of Social Flycatcher from South El Monte, Los Angeles County on 28 October 2015 is currently in circulation.
 
Kimball
 
Kimball L. Garrett
Ornithology Collections Manager
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
900 Exposition Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
 




Rose Canyon Merlin

Jim Roberts
 

This afternoon (4/29/16) a Merlin was perched on a snag along the main trail in Rose Canyon,
west of the Regents access. Unitt's County Atlas lists April 26 as the previous late date for
this species. It appeared to be an F. c. columbarius.

Jim Roberts
University City


Re: Gray Thrasher news

Mark Stratton
 

So us as observers how do we challenge this? The Xantus's  hummingbird with the same range in Canada is accepted but this one a couple hundred miles out of range isn't I think there is a problem there. The Cardinal I understand but this is a bird that if it was released probably would stay in its area and yet one found its way up here. This bird had nice feathers not cage feathers and yet it's not accepted this bird should be accepted. Mark Stratton San Diego

On Apr 29, 2016 4:51 PM, "Justyn Stahl justyn.stahl@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding]" <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:
 

San Diego Birders,

Per the forwarded message below, the California Bird Records Committee has voted (after 2 rounds of deliberation) not to accept the Gray Thrasher (Famosa Slough, 2 August 2015) due to concerns regarding this individual's natural occurrence.

Justyn Stahl

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Kimball Garrett kgarrett@... [CALBIRDS] <CALBIRDS-noreply@...>
Date: Fri, Apr 29, 2016 at 1:43 PM
Subject: [CALBIRDS] Recent CBRC news
To: "CALBIRDS@..." <CALBIRDS@...>


 

Birders,

 

The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) recently completed its second round of deliberations on the Gray Thrasher that appeared at Famosa Slough, San Diego County on 2 August 2016. The record was not accepted due to questionable natural occurrence, although this species may still be added to the “Supplemental List.”  The state list currently remains at 662 species.

 

Two potential additions to the California list are being considered by the CBRC:  Two records of  Purple Sandpiper (at Salt Creek, north end of the Salton Sea, Riverside Co. 25 March to 17 April 2016, and at Kehoe Beach, Pt. Reyes National Seashore, Marin Co. 25 April 2016) have been officially submitted to the CBRC, but have not yet circulated; the Committee will consider whether these records might represent the same individual.  A report of Social Flycatcher from South El Monte, Los Angeles County on 28 October 2015 is currently in circulation.

 

Kimball

 

Kimball L. Garrett

Ornithology Collections Manager

Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

900 Exposition Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA

(213) 763-3368

kgarrett@...

http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology

 



Gray Thrasher news

Justyn Stahl
 

San Diego Birders,

Per the forwarded message below, the California Bird Records Committee has voted (after 2 rounds of deliberation) not to accept the Gray Thrasher (Famosa Slough, 2 August 2015) due to concerns regarding this individual's natural occurrence.

Justyn Stahl

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Kimball Garrett kgarrett@... [CALBIRDS] <CALBIRDS-noreply@...>
Date: Fri, Apr 29, 2016 at 1:43 PM
Subject: [CALBIRDS] Recent CBRC news
To: "CALBIRDS@..." <CALBIRDS@...>


 

Birders,

 

The California Bird Records Committee (CBRC) recently completed its second round of deliberations on the Gray Thrasher that appeared at Famosa Slough, San Diego County on 2 August 2016. The record was not accepted due to questionable natural occurrence, although this species may still be added to the “Supplemental List.”  The state list currently remains at 662 species.

 

Two potential additions to the California list are being considered by the CBRC:  Two records of  Purple Sandpiper (at Salt Creek, north end of the Salton Sea, Riverside Co. 25 March to 17 April 2016, and at Kehoe Beach, Pt. Reyes National Seashore, Marin Co. 25 April 2016) have been officially submitted to the CBRC, but have not yet circulated; the Committee will consider whether these records might represent the same individual.  A report of Social Flycatcher from South El Monte, Los Angeles County on 28 October 2015 is currently in circulation.

 

Kimball

 

Kimball L. Garrett

Ornithology Collections Manager

Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

900 Exposition Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA

(213) 763-3368

kgarrett@...

http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology

 



Jacumba 4-29-16 Ten Warblers!

Eric Kallen
 

This morning i found 10 species of western warblers  including chat at the swamp.  Where's the yellow-rumped when you actually need it?  Damn.


MacGillivray's

Hermit

Nashville

Townsend's

BTGray (3)

Yellow (5)

Wilson's (12)

Orange-crowned

Common yellowthroat (2)

And Yellow-breasted chat

Bullock's oriole

Lawrence's goldfinch (2)

Blue grosbeak (2)

Western tanager (2)

Warbling vireo (2)

Green Heron (2)

Lazuli bunting (2)

Pac slope fly

BH grosbeak (4)

Tricolored bb many

Pine siskin

Black-throated sparrow


In my yard:

Oriole trifecta. 12 orioles at one time lining up at the jelly feeder.

BH grosbeak (5)

Trcolored bb. (20)

Pine Siskin (5)

Costa's hummer (3)


The mulberry tree on El Centro Ave

Western tanager (6)

BH grosbeak (4)


Eric Kallen

Jacumba




Mission Trails Regional Park

Catherine Zinsky
 

Took a small loop across the grasslands then back towards the dam via Oak Canyon Trail.  Wonderful birding this morning.  Highlights were:
Rufous-crowned Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Blue Grosbeak (heard only)
Bell's Vireo
Hutton's Vireo
Costa's Hummingbird
Wilson's Warbler
Warbling Vireo
Ash-throated Flycatcher

Some photos on flicker below...

--
Waggin' tails,

Catherine


Author of "Attitude + Attention =Teamwork!
                           Seven Steps to Success"
Available thru www.gettoready.net

Competitive Obedience Toolbox: www.gettoready.net

Ch Borderfame Soul Train UDX, OM ('Kellan the Felon' a.k.a. 'Sir Barkalot')
OTCH Sporting Fields Summer Solstice, UDX 8, OGM ("Dax", as in "Dax of the Long Tongue" aka 'Sir Lickalot'))
Ch. Sporting Field's Quantum Leap CDX  ('Devon' as in 'Devon the Usurper'  aka "Monkey")   
Ch. OTCH Trumagik Step Aside, UDX 20, OGM   (2002 - 2015)
 
 


Round 2: Borrego Springs Migration

W Terry Hunefeld
 

Okay.  Round 2.  I originally posted this message today at about 2:30 p.m.  Nothing happened.  So I am sending it again to see if Yahoo Groups immediately broadcasts both posts at the same time like it did yesterday.     

******************************

Despite high winds this morning we had a nice flurry of migrant activity here in the Anza Borrego desert valley.

At birder-friendly La Casa Del Zorro I found Black-headed Grosbeaks, Western Tanagers, three species of oriole, 6 Yellow Warblers, 3 Nashville Warblers, 5 Wilson's Warblers and a Black-throated Gray.   

The water treatment plant settling ponds revealed no singing vireos--however, the wind was blowing at 20mph with gusts to 45 mph. Clinging to the mesquites were 4 Wilson's Warblers and a Western Tanager.  

Terry Hunefeld

Borrego Springs



Flurries In The Desert

W Terry Hunefeld
 

Despite high winds this morning we had a nice flurry of migrant activity here in the Anza Borrego desert valley.

At birder-friendly La Casa Del Zorro I found Black-headed Grosbeaks, Western Tanagers, three species of oriole, 6 Yellow Warblers, 3 Nashville Warblers, 5 Wilson's Warblers and a Black-throated Gray.   

The water treatment plant settling ponds revealed no singing vireos--however, the wind was blowing at 20mph with gusts to 45 mph. Clinging to the mesquites were 4 Wilson's Warblers and a Western Tanager.  

Terry Hunefeld

Borrego Springs



Re: The Next 10 Species for San Diego County

Justyn Stahl
 

SD Birders,

Since compiling this list in September, there have been three new additions to the San Diego County list:

Varied Bunting, 13 October 2015 at Fiesta Island (accepted by the CBRC)
Common Black Hawk, 2 March 2016 at Camp Pendleton (pending acceptance by the CBRC)
Swallow-tailed Kite, 22 April 2016 at NOLF Imperial Beach, and then about 4 hours later and 55 miles north at Camp Pendleton (pending acceptance by the CBRC)

None of these were on anyone's Next 10 list, although three people (Dan King, Alex Abela, myself) had Common Black Hawk as an "honorable mention."

Phil Unitt was correct (three times over) when he said, "The laws of physics dictate that the next new species will be one NOT on this list!"

Cheers,
Justyn Stahl




On Wed, Sep 9, 2015 at 10:05 AM, Justyn Stahl <justyn.stahl@...> wrote:

Birders,


I recently asked what people thought the next 10 new additions to the San Diego County list would be. The results are summarized here. Based on votes from 13 respondents, 44 species were voted in various combinations of Next 10 lists (although 3 people submitted less than 10 species). Results were extremely varied, but a few species were clearly on most people’s minds. Another 8 “Honorable Mentions” were submitted that weren’t already on a Next 10 list.


The Next 10 as voted (# of votes in parentheses)

Nazca Booby (8*)
Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel (7)
Smith’s Longspur (7)
Yellow-billed Loon (6)
Hudsonian Godwit (6)
Field Sparrow (6)
Glossy Ibis (5)
White-rumped Sandpiper (5)
Ruby-throated Hummingbird (5)
Eastern Yellow Wagtail (5)

*all votes received before the recent Masked/Nazca report from the Hornblower


Other species from Next 10 lists:

Arctic Loon (4)
Eastern Wood-Pewee (4)
Black-headed Gull (3)
Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (2)
Swallow-tailed Gull (2)
Dusky Warbler (2)
Arctic Warbler (2)

Veery (2)

Slate-throated Redstart (2)


And 25 species each received 1 vote:
Baikal Teal
Kermadec Petrel
Juan Fernandez Petrel
Hawaiian Petrel
Bulwer's Petrel
Parkinson's Petrel
Christmas Shearwater
Townsend's Storm-Petrel (split from Leach's Storm-Petrel)
Markham's Storm-Petrel
Tristram's Storm-Petrel
Short-tailed Hawk
Rock Sandpiper
Slaty-backed Gull
Black-billed Cuckoo
Groove-billed Ani
Green Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Gyrfalcon
Alder Flycatcher
Couch's Kingbird
Blue Jay
Cave Swallow
Sedge Wren
Abert's Towhee


A few people submitted more than 10 species, noting extras as “Honorable Mentions.” Those 8 species not already submitted on another person's Next 10 list were:
Trumpeter Swan
Garganey
Common Black Hawk
Thick-billed Murre
Northern Pygmy-Owl
Northern Shrike
Olive-backed Pipit
Brambling


Thanks to the following for participating: Alex Abela, Tom Blackman, Nicole Desnoyers, Peter Ginsburg, Logan Kahle, Dan King, Paul Lehman, Curtis Marantz, Guy McCaskie, Jimmy McMorran, Bruce Rideout, and Geoff Rogers.

 

Good fall birding,

Justyn Stahl
San Clemente Island/San Diego




Mtn migration

Jim and Donna
 

Today (4-27-16) Dave Batzler, Ed Hall and I did a bird survey of the Green Valley campground, Cuyamaca SP, including the fire road to the top of the Pine Ridge trail, 4541 ft.  We came back via the Pine Ridge trail.  The highlights are listed below.  The most extraordinary part of this is that usually none of these birds are expected.  To get even one individual would be a pleasant surprise.  Peak migration really makes a difference.

Yellow-rumped Warbler 10
Black-throated Gray Warbler 2
Wilson’s Warbler 1
Hermit Warbler 12
Townsend’s Warbler 16
Nashville Warbler 6
Green-tailed Towhee 1

Thanks to Dave there are two photos of the Green-tailed Towhee at  https://flic.kr/s/aHskzbqgLB


Jim Zimmer
Carlsbad, CA


Re: Turkeys & Yahoo Groups

Gary Nunn
 

I just searched the SanDiegoRegionBirding group for "Franklin" which found 25 entries going back to 28 Dec 2013.

Appears to be working so far as I can tell.

Gary Nunn,
Pacific Beach.


On Apr 27, 2016, at 5:21 PM, Matt Sadowski matt.sadowski@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:

 

Regarding Yahoogroups, has anybody been able to search the archives recently? It hasn't worked for me for a week or more, both SDRB and the old SDBirds archives. Is anything being done to fix this?

Matt Sadowski

On 4/27/2016 4:51 PM, thunefeld@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] wrote:
 

Why do turkeys cross roads?


Why does Yahoo groups hold a message in queue for 2 hours, then INSTANTLY send it along with the submitted replacement post so that readers see the same post twice and the reporter looks like a dork?


These are the questions we're working on here in the desert, where the winds are forecast to HOWL again tomorrow.  


Terry Hunefeld

Borrego Springs


... Wind Advisory remains in effect from 5 PM this afternoon to
noon PDT Thursday...

* winds... westerly 25 to 35 mph with gusts 45 to 55 mph. Isolated
  gusts to 60 mph in the windiest locations.

* Timing... late this afternoon through Thursday morning.

* Location... ridgetops and desert slopes of the mountains in
  Riverside and San Diego counties.

* Visibility... locally reduced in blowing dust.

* Impacts... travel locally hazardous.

Precautionary/preparedness actions...

A Wind Advisory means that winds of 35 mph are expected. Winds
this strong can make driving difficult... especially for high
profile vehicles. Use extra caution.




Re: Turkeys & Yahoo Groups

Matt Sadowski <matt.sadowski@...>
 

Regarding Yahoogroups, has anybody been able to search the archives recently? It hasn't worked for me for a week or more, both SDRB and the old SDBirds archives. Is anything being done to fix this?

Matt Sadowski

On 4/27/2016 4:51 PM, thunefeld@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] wrote:
 

Why do turkeys cross roads?


Why does Yahoo groups hold a message in queue for 2 hours, then INSTANTLY send it along with the submitted replacement post so that readers see the same post twice and the reporter looks like a dork?


These are the questions we're working on here in the desert, where the winds are forecast to HOWL again tomorrow.  


Terry Hunefeld

Borrego Springs


... Wind Advisory remains in effect from 5 PM this afternoon to
noon PDT Thursday... 

* winds... westerly 25 to 35 mph with gusts 45 to 55 mph. Isolated
  gusts to 60 mph in the windiest locations.

* Timing... late this afternoon through Thursday morning.

* Location... ridgetops and desert slopes of the mountains in 
  Riverside and San Diego counties. 

* Visibility... locally reduced in blowing dust.

* Impacts... travel locally hazardous.

Precautionary/preparedness actions... 

A Wind Advisory means that winds of 35 mph are expected. Winds
this strong can make driving difficult... especially for high
profile vehicles. Use extra caution.




Turkeys & Yahoo Groups

W Terry Hunefeld
 

Why do turkeys cross roads?


Why does Yahoo groups hold a message in queue for 2 hours, then INSTANTLY send it along with the submitted replacement post so that readers see the same post twice and the reporter looks like a dork?


These are the questions we're working on here in the desert, where the winds are forecast to HOWL again tomorrow.  


Terry Hunefeld

Borrego Springs


... Wind Advisory remains in effect from 5 PM this afternoon to
noon PDT Thursday...

* winds... westerly 25 to 35 mph with gusts 45 to 55 mph. Isolated
gusts to 60 mph in the windiest locations.

* Timing... late this afternoon through Thursday morning.

* Location... ridgetops and desert slopes of the mountains in
Riverside and San Diego counties.

* Visibility... locally reduced in blowing dust.

* Impacts... travel locally hazardous.

Precautionary/preparedness actions...

A Wind Advisory means that winds of 35 mph are expected. Winds
this strong can make driving difficult... especially for high
profile vehicles. Use extra caution.



Desert Migration & Why Did The Turkey Cross The Road?

W Terry Hunefeld
 

Today was a lovely migration day in the desert.  A four-mile sunrise hike around Rams Hill Country Club golf course included a right-on-time Western Wood-Peewee, a male Red-breasted Merganser, 6 Spotted Sandpipers, 25 Yellow-headed Blackbirds, 11 Hooded Orioles, a Warbling Vireo and more than 50 warblers: 31 Wilson’s, 2 Black-throated Gray, 5 Yellow, 2 MacGillivray’s, 4 Nashville, 1 Orange-crowned, and 7 Yellowthroats. 

 

Right at sunrise five Lesser Nighthawks foraged effortlessly over the golf course ponds while throughout the morning 7 adult Verdin were observed busily feeding 8 persistently begging juveniles. 

 

12 Eared Grebes were seen, 10 in breeding plumage.  On April 17  I recorded 8 here.  Previously, the high eBird count in the Borrego Valley was 3. Will they breed here?

 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/ checklist?subID=S29241501

 

The Rams Hill residential neighborhood is gated (thus listed on eBird as restricted) but the public golf course and its restaurant are open to the public daily with a big parking lot.  Birders & walkers are welcome to walk the concrete golf cart paths, many of which lead into the residential neighborhood while others meander through the golf course.  We’re simply asked to be respectful of golfers and to step aside for golf carts and maintenance vehicles.   

 

Yesterday two Least Bell’s Vireos were singing at the water treatment plant settling ponds.  This is the first year they’ve been recorded at the settling ponds per eBird.   Bestselling author, musician, vireo census-taker and retired park ranger Bob Theriault confirms they’ve never been recorded breeding at this location. Will they breed here this year?  The mesquite is green and lush.  Ranger Bob will keep a close eye on them as he conducts his vireo census.  

 

Yesterday when hiking the pictograph trail in Blair Valley we saw a migrating Western Tanager a Warbling Vireo.  3-5 Scott’s Orioles were singing lustily from the tops of Ocotillos.  Three Wild Turkeys (uncommon east of the mountains) were seen crossing Highway S-2 between Scissor’s Crossing and Shelter Valley raising the question: Why did the turkeys cross the road?  

 

Terry Hunefeld

Borrego Springs



MacGillvray's Warbler-San Elijo Visitor Ctr Trail,

Susan Smith
 

I stopped briefly at this trail at about 3 pm today 27 April and saw a beautiful MACGILLIVRAYS WARBLER foraging  in back of the Alexandra Ellis bench along the north trail that runs parallel to Manchester. A couple of Nashville Warblers were also seen along the trails in addition to the breeding grosbeaks, yellow warblers etc.  Unfortunately, a little past the Ellis bench, I noticed some of the dead willows along the side of the trail looked like they had been infested by the Kuroshio Shothole Borer beetle. Let's hope not!  I alerted two of the staff rangers there.  

Susan Smith
Seiurus Biological  Consulting
Del Mar, CA 



Why Did The Turkey Cross The Road At Scissor's Crossing?

W Terry Hunefeld
 

Today was a lovely migration day in the desert.  A four-mile sunrise hike around Rams Hill Country Club golf course included a right-on-time Western Wood-Peewee, a male Red-breasted Merganser, 6 Spotted Sandpipers, 25 Yellow-headed Blackbirds, 11 Hooded Orioles, a Warbling Vireo and more than 50 warblers: 31 Wilson’s, 2 Black-throated Gray, 5 Yellow, 2 MacGillivray’s, 4 Nashville, 1 Orange-crowned, and 7 Yellowthroats. 

Right at sunrise five Lesser Nighthawks foraged effortlessly over the golf course ponds while throughout the morning 7 adult Verdin were observed busily feeding 8 persistently begging juveniles. 

12 Eared Grebes were seen, 10 in breeding plumage.  On April 17  I recorded 8 here.  Previously, the high eBird count in the Borrego Valley was 3. 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29241501

The Rams Hill residential neighborhood is gated (thus listed on eBird as restricted) but the public golf course and its restaurant are open to the public daily with a big parking lot.  Birders & walkers are welcome to walk the concrete golf cart paths, many of which lead into the residential neighborhood while others meander through the golf course.  We’re simply asked to be respectful of golfers and to step aside for golf carts and maintenance vehicles.   

Yesterday two Least Bell’s Vireos were singing at the water treatment plant settling ponds.  This is the first year they’ve been recorded at the settling ponds per eBird.   Bestselling author, musician, vireo census-taker and retired park ranger Bob Theriault confirms they’ve never been recorded breeding at that location. 

Yesterday when hiking the pictograph trail in Blair Valley we saw a migrating Western Tanager and Warbling Vireo.  3-5 Scott’s Orioles were singing lustily from the tops of Ocotillos.  Three Wild Turkeys (uncommon east of the mountains) were seen crossing Highway S-2 between Scissor’s Crossing and Shelter Valley.  Why the turkeys crossed the road we could only speculate. 

 

Terry Hunefeld

Borrego Springs

 



Oak titmouse, Olive-sided flycatcher, Western Wood-Pewee

thomas meixner
 

Sorry for the delayed report, but yesterday (4/25/16) at Mission Gorge Dam I had an Olive-sided Flycatcher near the dam area, a Western Wood-Pewee up the Oak Canyon trail, Lazuli Buntings further up the same trail. Also, Blue Grosbeaks just north of the 52 bridge and one Violet-green Swallow at Kumayaay Lake mixed in with about 20 Tree Swallows.

Today in Los Penasquitos Canyon off Black Mountain Rd. I had another Olive-sided Flycatcher about a mile west of the Ranch House Crossing on the south side of the river. This just seems odd to me to have them so early on the coastal slope?

Also, of what may be of minor interest is an Oak Titmouse seems to have taken up residency in the same general area as the Olive-side in Penasquitos Canyon. I say this because I have had the same bird in this general area since at least 9/29/15.

Good birding to all; I'll see some of you on Saturday's pelagic!
Tom "Mt. Goat" Meixner

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