Date   

San Diego Region Birding Marbled Godwit Lake Murray

Judy Neave
 

This morning about 8:30 there was a marbled godwit on shoreline of beach/picnic area west of parking lot (mixed in with mallards). Unusual for Lake Murray. Note Kiowa lot closed for second Tuesday, park on Baltimore. Photos on E bird checklist.

Judy Neave
El Cajon


Re: Blue-headed Vireo

Alison Hiers
 

We were there from about 8 to 10:15 and did not find it.  There were about 8 or so other people who came and went, checking around the rest of the park as well with no luck that we heard of.

Alison Hiers
Carlsbad

On Sep 14, 2021, at 10:02 AM, Pete Gordon <peterandmiko@...> wrote:

Good morning,

Has anbody seen the Blue-headed Vireo this morning?

Pete Gordon
Foothill Ranch  CA


Blue-headed Vireo

Pete Gordon
 

Good morning,

Has anbody seen the Blue-headed Vireo this morning?

Pete Gordon
Foothill Ranch  CA


California and Black-tailed Gnatcatchers at Oak Grove

Philip Unitt
 

Dear friends,

 

From 31 August to 2 September 2021, Lori Hargrove and I completed our first round of bird surveys of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Oak Grove Wildlife Area. Acquired a few years ago, the area includes much of the floor of Oak Grove Valley in north-central San Diego County, including all of the wash of Chihuahua Creek, and some of the surrounding slopes.  Our most notable discovery: a new site for the California Gnatcatcher, at an elevation of 2800 to 3050 feet, higher than previously known. We observed two pairs along the wash of Chihuahua Creek and heard the species’ diagnostic calls at two other sites. I got a recording of the calls of one pair with my cell phone. So evidently there is a population, not just a wandering individual.

 

Not only does Oak Grove represent a new site for the California Gnatcatcher, it’s also a new site of sympatry of the California and Black-tailed Gnatcatchers. At two spots, the two species of gnatcatchers were in adjacent territories. Basically, what we found was an extension of the desert fauna that Ken Weaver described just 3 to 5 miles to the northwest at Aguanga in Riverside County and in Dameron Valley, straddling the county line (https://archive.westernfieldornithologists.org/archive/V42/WB-V42-1-Weaver.pdf). That includes, among the birds, also good numbers of the Cactus Wren (presumably the desert subspecies anthonyi), Ladder-backed Woodpecker (here overlapping with Nuttall’s Woodpecker), and Black-throated Sparrow. All these are resident on the coastal slope: Chihuahua Creek drains into Temecula Creek, which ultimately becomes the Santa Margarita River.

 

Among mammals, we noted several white-tailed antelope squirrels and among reptiles numerous juvenile zebra-tailed lizards, plus Lori saw one leopard lizard, all characteristically desert species also representing isolated populations here on the coastal slope. So we have already noted most of the species that make this area of unusual biogeographical interest. In his article, Ken Weaver called attention to the piecemeal development eroding the habitat supporting these isolated populations around Aguanga, so it is good news to find that a significant chunk of it has been conserved by CDFW.

 

We also noted the comparative sterility of the former agricultural fields on the valley floor now grown largely to mustard. Since we could not find a single California ground squirrel, we were discouraged over the possibility of the Burrowing Owl. Nevertheless, active rodent burrows were evident in some parts of the valley floor, so the search for the possibility of Stephens’ and Merriam’s kangaroo rats will be high priority for Scott Tremor when he makes his surveys of the area for mammals. The use of this habitat at other seasons is something to be investigated as well, but there is an opportunity for restoration of grassland, and some kind of restoration is part of CDFW’s eventual plan.

 

We have one 3-day survey per season scheduled for the upcoming year, so next spring and summer we’ll also focus on the question of persistence of the Gray Vireo, found in the surrounding area during field work for the San Diego County Bird Atlas 1997-2001.

 

A couple of weeks ago there was a little discussion of the fall migration of the Violet-green Swallow. On 1 September I saw 6 in Oak Grove Valley. Five were circling over the valley foraging so could represent postbreeding dispersal from nearby Palomar Mountain, but one emerged from the hills to the north and flew in a beeline to the south.

 

CDFW’s Oak Grove area is closed to the public, so our surveys through the San Diego Natural History Museum on behalf of CDFW represent a rare opportunity to explore this area to which we did not have good access for the bird atlas.

 

Good birding,

 

Philip Unitt

San Diego

 


Re: tipus and lerpy eucalyptus

Susan Smith
 

Paul et al. , Concerning the drop in lerp infestations in eucalyptus, I read in one study (Dahlsten et al 2005) which measured the decline in lerp densities  in Southern California after multiple releases  (1999 through July 2002) of the biological control (the parasitic wasp,   Psyllaphaegus bliteus from Australia). They  found lerp densities  had decreased as much as 78-79% after these releases.   This was published in 2005, so I would imagine the decline in lerp densities since then may be even more.    We have noticed a big decline in densities at the San Diego Botanic Garden, too.  Sue 

Susan Smith 
Seiurus Biological  Consulting 
Del Mar, CA 
seiurus@...


-----Original Message-----
From: lehman.paul@... via groups.io <lehman.paul@...>
To: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Sep 13, 2021 4:48 pm
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] tipus and lerpy eucalyptus

My impression while birding and otherwise checking quite a few areas of
south county for the past several weeks is that almost all tipu trees
are fairly dead, bird-wise. Some years they seem to attract reasonable
numbers of warblers, etc., already by latter September, but other years
they are not good until much later. Last year, they were very slow until
almost mid-November. This year seems to be following that same scenario,
so far. And while last year was good for many patches of birdy lerpy
eucalyptus, this year seems to have substantially fewer infected trees,
and few birds. I can find only a couple patches (e.g., in Tierrasanta)
with active, fresh lerps, whereas many of last year's patches are not in
use and mostly birdless. It would be very helpful to other birders if
folks who DO find active, bird-rich lerp areas, let others know!

--Paul Lehman, San Diego








--
Susan Smith
Seiurus Biological Consulting
Del Mar, CA


tipus and lerpy eucalyptus

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

My impression while birding and otherwise checking quite a few areas of south county for the past several weeks is that almost all tipu trees are fairly dead, bird-wise. Some years they seem to attract reasonable numbers of warblers, etc., already by latter September, but other years they are not good until much later. Last year, they were very slow until almost mid-November. This year seems to be following that same scenario, so far. And while last year was good for many patches of birdy lerpy eucalyptus, this year seems to have substantially fewer infected trees, and few birds. I can find only a couple patches (e.g., in Tierrasanta) with active, fresh lerps, whereas many of last year's patches are not in use and mostly birdless. It would be very helpful to other birders if folks who DO find active, bird-rich lerp areas, let others know!

--Paul Lehman, San Diego


Re: Seaforth Sportfishing birding trip #'s

Donna Mancuso
 

Oops. Correction. The trip is September 19, and I’m really disappointed I can’t make it.
Thanks David for the correction.


Seaforth Sportfishing birding trip #'s

Donna Mancuso
 

I was looking for someone who might be interested in trading their October birding reservation for a September 18 reservation. I had a family emergency in Massachusetts and will not be able to attend.
I talked to Sterling at Seaforth who gave me the ok 
Donna Mancuso


Re: Blue-headed Vireo, Doyle Park

Geoff Veith
 

Blue headed vireo originally found by Joe Damalo reappeared at 11:23 am behind and along fence line behind pine trees SSE of ball field backstop. 

Geoff Veith
Solana Beach 

On Mon, Sep 13, 2021 at 10:05 AM Nancy Christensen <nancy.r.christensen@...> wrote:
Bird was missing g for 2 hours but reappeared about 9:30. Seen in a small tree in the lawn area between dog oark and ball fields.

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb

On Sep 13, 2021, at 7:38 AM, Timothy Swain <tswain3420@...> wrote:

As of 7:30 AM being seen in the trees along the eastern edge of the sports field. Jumps between trees pretty often. 

- Tim Swain

--
- Tim Swain


Zone-tailed Hawk Poway

Lisa Ruby
 

Just had a Zone-tailed Hawk soar over Old Poway Park. It was moving fast, heading east.

Lisa Ruby
Sabre Springs


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



--
Lisa Ruby
Sabre Springs


Re: Blue-headed Vireo, Doyle Park

Nancy Christensen
 

Bird was missing g for 2 hours but reappeared about 9:30. Seen in a small tree in the lawn area between dog oark and ball fields.

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb

On Sep 13, 2021, at 7:38 AM, Timothy Swain <tswain3420@...> wrote:

As of 7:30 AM being seen in the trees along the eastern edge of the sports field. Jumps between trees pretty often. 

- Tim Swain

--
- Tim Swain


Tricolored Heron San Elijo

Geoff Veith
 

Tricolored Heron at San Elijo, east of tracks and west of the five. 9/13 at 9:37 am   (33.0060248, -117.2665919) Found by Steve Perry. 

Geoff Veith 
Solana Beach 


Blue-headed Vireo, Doyle Park

Timothy Swain
 

As of 7:30 AM being seen in the trees along the eastern edge of the sports field. Jumps between trees pretty often. 

- Tim Swain

--
- Tim Swain


Re: YES Blue-headed Vireo, Doyle Community Park

Justyn Stahl
 


Disregard, just reappeared. 1135

Justyn 

On Sun, Sep 12, 2021 at 11:32 AM Justyn Stahl <justyn.stahl@...> wrote:
Last seen around 1000, a bird found this morning (12 Sep) by John Dumlao has been MIA since. I understand it was in the SE corner of the park in the vicinity of the ball field #2 backstop, roughly: (32.8638697, -117.2188351)

Justyn Stahl
North Park 


Blue-headed Vireo, Doyle Community Park

Justyn Stahl
 

Last seen around 1000, a bird found this morning (12 Sep) by John Dumlao has been MIA since. I understand it was in the SE corner of the park in the vicinity of the ball field #2 backstop, roughly: (32.8638697, -117.2188351)

Justyn Stahl
North Park 


Pectoral Sandpipers L. Otay, 9-12-21

David Povey
 

There were two Pectoral Sandpiper at the far east end of Lower Otay Lake 0730 this morning. 
Did not see Tricolored Heron in brief stay this morning.
Lake level continues to slowly receded, vegetation advances at about the same speed. 
Dave Povey
Dulzura


Migration website

Tuck Russell
 

Apologies if this has been posted before.  Here is a website called BirdCast that forecasts migration across the country.  You can enter your city and get alerts.


Tuck Russell
Hillcrest


Re: fall migration ups and downs, and accurate departure dates for rarities - PRAIRIE WARBLER

Susan Newlin
 

Prairie Warbler.
I'm glad to hear that there were other Prairie Warblers identified in SD county. I heard that very distinct call in my San Marcos back yard over the last 2 weeks, and was confused as to what it could be, given I didn't think they were found in So. California. But glad to hear I wasn't crazy. I also heard it during Spring migration. I'll be sure to record it from now on ...(I'm new to the area so a bit timid on my ID's.)

Susan Newlin
SusanNewlin@comcast.net
978-771-6839

-----Original Message-----
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io <SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io> On Behalf Of lehman.paul@verizon.net via groups.io
Sent: Friday, September 10, 2021 3:15 PM
To: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] fall migration ups and downs, and accurate departure dates for rarities

Both spring and fall migration periods are, of course, not one continuous stream of migrants and rarities, but they are typically punctuated by good periods and slow periods of varying lengths. We had a recent good period for rare birds in the county, starting a week ago on the 3rd and lasting a few days, during which we had the Red-faced Warbler, 3 Prairie Warblers, the Yellow-green Vireo, 2 Eastern Kingbirds, 2 Stilt Sandpipers, several Am. Redstarts, Black-and-white, and Rose-breasted Grosbeak, among others. Then, these birds, after staying a variable number of days, start filtering out and are replaced by not much. So, we await the next arriving pulse!! It should also be said that so far this fall has seen fairly low numbers of most western landbird migrants, even during this recent period of rarity wealth. One regular species in OK numbers seems to be Western Tanager, but most other migrants seem low or very low.

Speaking of departing birds, sometimes it is not easy to determine the definite last date for a rarity because a few reports of such birds continue but are of uncertain validity. A case in point is the Fort Rosecrans Cemetery Yellow-green Vireo, which was definitely present through the 8th, but only a handful of sight reports (no photos) since then, whereas most folks miss the bird (although it was a sneaky individual and easy to miss). BUT, there is also a known Warbling Vireo through today in those same trees. The culprit, or are both birds truly still there?? (Immature western Warbling Vireos in fall can be fairly yellow on the sides, as some of you may have recently seen at Smuggler's Gulch alongside the Red-faced Warbler.)

--Paul Lehman, San Diego


Whelan Lake

Kenneth Weaver
 

Dave Batzler, Ed Hall, Clark Mahrdt, Jim Zimmer and I visited Whelan Lake yesterday (9/10).
We found an estimated 450 Red-necked Phalaropes on the lake in the early morning.  Numbers
dwindled to about 100 by late morning.   A couple of Horned Grebes at the lake are scarce away
from the immediate coast.  The Brown Pelican found by Denise Riddle on September 4 continued.

Migrant songbirds were sparse with a Willow Flycatcher, a Western Wood-Pewee, and a Wilson's
Warbler observed.  Three Bell's Vireos were still singing in the willows around the lake.

Ken Weaver
Fallbrook
gnatcatcehr@...


Pacific Golden Plovers at Tijuana River Estuary

dan jehl
 

This morning, September 11, 2021, at around 10:00 AM I had a pair of Pacific Golden Plovers mixed in with a flock of about 20 Black-bellied Plovers in the ice plant along the side of the Tijuana River Estuary. I parked at the south end of Seacoast Drive and walked to the river mouth without seeing the birds, but on the way back a flock of plovers was visible about 200 yards north of the south end of the seasonal fence. I talked to other birders who had been there earlier without seeing the PAGP. The tide was coming up while I was there, perhaps the incoming tide pushed the plovers from the mud flats to the top of the berm? Or they may have finished feeding and gone to roost at that time, not sure but they weren’t visible for any of us earlier. The McQuades had a single PAGP here on September 5th.

Dan Jehl
San Diego

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