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Fall migrants in coastal North County

Paula Theobald
 

Today, we had several fall migrants near Guajome Lake Park including two Nashville Warblers. If I am reading the recent update to the SD Bird Atlas correctly, it would tie a record from 1981 for early coastal fall migrating Nashville Warblers.


Paula and Dave Theobald
Oceanside


San Diego pelagic: 6 Cook's Petrels, Long-tailed Jaegers, Black & Arctic Terns, 8 Townsend's, 8 Craveri's

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

The San Diego pelagic trip on Saturday, 14 August, aboard "Legacy" and sponsored by Buena Vista Audubon Society, out to the 30-Mile Bank and "The Corner" was very successful! Reasonably good sea conditions, excellent birds, and more bird activity for much of the day than has been the norm in recent times! A major highlight certainly was the 6 (possibly 7) COOK'S PETRELS scattered during the day, with good views and including birds as close to shore as the eastern San Diego Trough. Also good looks at various TOWNSEND'S STORM-PETRELS--as many as 8+ birds--a high count of approx. 30 Leach's Storm-Petrels, 2 Ashy Storm-Petrels, a BLACK TERN and a young ARCTIC TERN with Common Terns, some 5 LONG-TAILED JAEGERS, 5 Sabine's Gulls of varying ages, 2 rare-in-summer NORTHERN FULMARS, some 8 CRAVERI'S MURRELETS (mostly only in flight), a rare-in-August Scripps's Murrelet, and 8 Brown Boobies. Unfortunately, a single LEAST STORM-PETREL was seen by just a very few observers. Several Surfbirds were on the Mission Bay jetties. Copious photos from the trip will be posted with the e-Bird reports in a few days, and elsewhere. Totals for the day beyond 2 miles offshore were:

Red-necked Phalarope 60

Pomarine Jaeger 1

Long-tailed Jaeger 5 (scattered)

Scripps's Murrelet 1 (very rare this late in season)

Craveri's Murrelet 8 (scattered, seen almost only in flight)

murrelet sp. 4

Cassin's Auklet 3 (poor views)

Sabine's Gull 5

Heermann's Gull 12

Western Gull 160

Black Tern 1 (30-Mile Bank)

Common Tern 16

Arctic Tern 1 (30-Mile Bank)

Elegant Tern 500

Ashy Storm-Petrel 2

Leach's Storm-Petrel 30 (including many dark-rumped "Chapman's" types)

Townsend's Storm-Petrel 8

Black Storm-Petrel 80

Least Storm-Petrel 1

COOK'S PETREL 6 (1 at the Corner that put on a good show, 2 on 30-Mile Bank, 3 in SD Trough to within about 18 miles of shore)

Northern Fulmar 2

Pink-footed Shearwater 170

Sooty Shearwater 25

Black-vented Shearwater 250

Brown Booby 8

Brown Pelican 17

Double-crested Cormorant 1

Also, brief views of Fin, Briede's, Humpback, and probably Minke Whales.

The September pelagic sponsored by Buena Vista Audubon aboard Legacy is full, but the early October trip still has space and has the same good potential.

---Paul Lehman, Dave Povey, Bruce Rideout, Dan Jehl, Gary Nunn, and the many participants; San Diego


Buena Vista Audubon Pelagic trip Saturday August 14th.

David Povey
 

Hello all ,
Just a reminder that the Buena Vista Audubon Pelagic is tomorrow , Saturday  August 14th.
Please check in at the office first. Then we met on the patio area behind the Seaforth Landing Building.  Do this between 6.a.m. and no later than 6:30 a.m. We plan to board at 6:45 ish. and depart promptly at 7 a.m.
The trip is booked full and has a waiting list. I would suggest those on the first three spots of the waiting list, show up and expect to go ( They are in order Chad, Cruz, and Paladichuk ).
Parking is free and available within limits in the lot out front, more parking on the street. I would not park in the conference center parking lot.
The current sea's forecast looks ok, with winds less than 10kts. a.m. Becoming west at 10 in the afternoon. Swell west 1-2 ft. at 7sec. and south 2 to 3 ft. 11 sec.. Wind waves of 2 ft. or less. Wish the interval were a little longer, but wave height is low. As always there will be motion, so  prepare as needed there. 
Plan on full bright sun but even if overcast use sunscreen, have a hat and sunglasses.
A wind breaker is also a good idea as breezes can be cool in the morning.
The boat is the 80ft. Legacy.  Drinks and snacks are available for purchase. I would bring a sandwich or the like, for your lunch.
You can contact me by email at www.poveydw747@... or call my cell at 619 972-3098
if you have questions

Dave Povey
Dulzura


early-season landbird migrants (incl. W-w Dove), Mission Bay tern nesting

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

On Thurs, the 12th, there were 3 juv. Lesser Yellowlegs at the salt works.

On Friday the 13th, an OK number of landbird migrants on outer Point Loma included a wayward White-winged Dove, and a presumed early post-fledging juvenile American Robin at a location where the species is not known to nest, and it was hurtling around from tree to tree looking unsettled, 3 continuing wayward White-breasted Nuthatches, a Western Wood-Pewee, 8 Western Tanagers, and a Black-headed Grosbeak.

On the crescent-shaped dredge-spoil island in northern Mission Bay, just southeast of Crown Point and just off the lawn section of Mission Bay Park which has produced multiple longspurs and Dickcissel in the past few falls, not only have a fair number of Forster's Terns successfully bred, but today there was a pair of CASPIAN Terns with a large fuzzy chick in tow. This species previously was found nesting in the county only at the salt works, plus one year they unsuccessfully did so on NAS North Island. Also, there are lots of Black Skimmers currently present on this island, and it sort of looks like some of them may too be nesting, which would also constitute just the third all-time breeding location in the county, but the views from the park currently preclude confirming such. Hopefully in the next week or two it will be clear. Certainly it would be fairly straightforward to determine such if one has access to a simple watercraft with which to circumnavigate the little island...

--Paul Lehman, San Diego


Re: JUNK: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Peanuts?!

Bruce Rideout
 

Gjon: If you mean the pipping couplets, Pacific-slope Flycatchers have a similar call that you don’t hear that often. Black Phoebes also have a similar call, but it tends to be more irregular rather than in couplets.

Bruce Rideout
La Mesa

On Aug 13, 2021, at 10:27 AM, Gjon Hazard <gjon_hazard@...> wrote:

I just heard what I am almost certain was a Pygmy Nuthatch calling from high in a pine tree in my east Encinitas neighborhood. It called for like 45 seconds and was gone. No visual. Sound was spot-on. My only hesitancy is the lowland coastal location.

Is there a similar-sounding, more logical bird that I’m blanking on?

-Gjon

--
- - -
Gjon Hazard
Encinitas




Peanuts?!

Gjon Hazard
 

I just heard what I am almost certain was a Pygmy Nuthatch calling from high in a pine tree in my east Encinitas neighborhood. It called for like 45 seconds and was gone. No visual. Sound was spot-on. My only hesitancy is the lowland coastal location.

Is there a similar-sounding, more logical bird that I’m blanking on?

-Gjon

--
- - -
Gjon Hazard
Encinitas


offshore San Diego Weds: 2 Cook's Petrels, Townsend's, Craveri's

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

Several of us went offshore on Weds, 11 Aug, as far as "The Corner" some 33 miles west of Point Loma. Conditions were choppy and somewhat bumpy on the small boat, so that likely hurt our seeing some numbers of alcids and storm-petrels. Highlights were 2 Cook's Petrels together at The Corner, where we also had repeated views of a Townsend's Storm-Petrel, as well as a few of our 7 Leach's Storm-Petrels of the day, plus a total of 6 Craveri's Murrelets (and 4 murrelet sp.). Other birds of note included 2 Ashy Storm-Petrels, 3 Parasitic Jaegers, a juvenile Sabine's Gull, 3 Common Terns, and 3 Brown Boobies.

--Paul Lehman, San Diego


Little Stint, 8/11, South Bay Salt Works

Matt Sadowski
 

The Little Stint is back for its 4th winter. It was foraging on pond 23 island off the end of 10th Street near the peak of the high tide. It took off to parts unknown when a roosting group of about 50 Westerns that were there flushed from the island. The bird is in worn alternate plumage still but starting to molt. It looks fairly ugly and probably not easily distinguishable from the many molting adult Westerns around. I'm not even gonna bother trying to describe the plumage. Photos in eBird later.

The juvenile Baird's Sandpiper was in Pond 22 off the end of 13th, but mostly along the almost impossible to see south shoreline. It was flighty and very vocal and flew east towards the lowered (but now drying up) pond 20. It was not re-found later. The high tide has not been coinciding with good early morning viewing conditions for this pond so it's unlikely to produce anything anytime soon. Best bet for a Baird's now would be a nice ungroomed kelpy beach.

Matt Sadowski


Semipalmated and Baird's Sandpipers at saltworks, 08/11

Barbara
 

Meeting around 6 AM this Wednesday morning, Joe Alsadi, Dave Trissel, John Dumlao, and I scoped Pond 20 for interesting shorebirds. Around 7:30 AM, Joe spotted a slightly smaller (than the Western Sandpipers) juvenile with no rufous on its scapulars in really good early morning light. Its bill was short, straight and blunt-tipped when compared to the nearby Westerns. We believe we may have re-found the Semipalmated Sandpiper that Paul Lehman had yesterday.
It was too distant to digiscope. More details in checklist here:



At 10:38 AM, I received a text from Matt Sadowski saying, "BASA [Baird's Sandpiper] just flew from the impossible to see S shore off [pond] 22 E towards [pond] 20." Joe is there now attempting to re-locate.

Good birding,

Barbara Carlson
San Diego




More info re Whydahs

phil Pryde
 

Update on the San Carlos Whydahs: About 7:05 p.m. this evening there was again a PTWH on a Tp wire near the seed feeders at 6235 Lake Leven Dr.  This one was clearly a juvenile; it had a small body (size of a sparrow), no red at all on the bill, and its tail was at most a foot long.  After a while he flew to the highest Tp wire, where he was shortly joined by an only slightly larger Whydah.  This was the first time I’ve seen two together at this location. The two then flew together into a densely leafed tree across the street from 6235, and ceased making their sip-sip-sip-sip-sip call, apparently planning to spend the night there.  

These two were both smaller than the larger first PTWH I saw at this site a couple of weeks ago. So, there are at least 3 male Whydahs who visit this site, make use of the seed feeders here, and may overnight here.  No females have been seen here that I’ve heard about. 

Given the more comprehensive information that Justyn provided a few days ago, it certainly seems that the Whydahs are well on their way to becoming established in the county.  Is this good, bad, or indifferent?  We’ll know in due time. 

Phil Pryde
San Carlos


Re: Least Storm-Petrel on SOUTH SAN DIEGO BAY

Matt Sadowski
 

After a 13:05 scan I don't see it flying around anymore. May have moved north into wider central bay area off Grand Caribe, Attu Ave., or Delta Beach viewpoints.

Matt Sadowski

On Tue, Aug 10, 2021, 12:03 PM Matt Sadowski via groups.io <mattsadowski78=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Still doing laps around south bay at 1200. Best bet would be to scope from the South Bay Bio Parking dike that extends east into the bay towards saltworks.

Matt Sadowski


On Tue, Aug 10, 2021, 11:46 AM lehman.paul@... via groups.io <lehman.paul=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
Matt Sadowski just called at 11:30AM Tuesday to report a Least
Storm-Petrel flying around on South San Diego Bay! He watched it fly
from north of the saltworks fly down to the southwest corner of the Bay
off Emory Cove. Obviously it could go anywhere from there. Possible
vantage points to check would be off Emory Cove, Grand Caribe in
Coronado Cays, or Chula Vista Bayfront Park. Needless to say, a scope
would presumably be essential. Good luck! There is at least one previous
record for San Diego Bay. Such Bay records MIGHT be the result of a bird
coming on board a fishing boat offshore at night and then getting tossed
overboard once back at port.

Earlier in the morning at salt works Pond 20, we could not re-find the
Semipalmated Sandpiper, but did have one juv Lesser Yellowlegs and a
very surprising duo of JUVENILE Ruddy Turnstones, which breaks the
previous 'early' arrival date of juveniles by NINE days.

--Paul Lehman, San Diego







Re: Least Storm-Petrel on SOUTH SAN DIEGO BAY

Matt Sadowski
 

Still doing laps around south bay at 1200. Best bet would be to scope from the South Bay Bio Parking dike that extends east into the bay towards saltworks.

Matt Sadowski


On Tue, Aug 10, 2021, 11:46 AM lehman.paul@... via groups.io <lehman.paul=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
Matt Sadowski just called at 11:30AM Tuesday to report a Least
Storm-Petrel flying around on South San Diego Bay! He watched it fly
from north of the saltworks fly down to the southwest corner of the Bay
off Emory Cove. Obviously it could go anywhere from there. Possible
vantage points to check would be off Emory Cove, Grand Caribe in
Coronado Cays, or Chula Vista Bayfront Park. Needless to say, a scope
would presumably be essential. Good luck! There is at least one previous
record for San Diego Bay. Such Bay records MIGHT be the result of a bird
coming on board a fishing boat offshore at night and then getting tossed
overboard once back at port.

Earlier in the morning at salt works Pond 20, we could not re-find the
Semipalmated Sandpiper, but did have one juv Lesser Yellowlegs and a
very surprising duo of JUVENILE Ruddy Turnstones, which breaks the
previous 'early' arrival date of juveniles by NINE days.

--Paul Lehman, San Diego







Least Storm-Petrel on SOUTH SAN DIEGO BAY

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

Matt Sadowski just called at 11:30AM Tuesday to report a Least Storm-Petrel flying around on South San Diego Bay! He watched it fly from north of the saltworks fly down to the southwest corner of the Bay off Emory Cove. Obviously it could go anywhere from there. Possible vantage points to check would be off Emory Cove, Grand Caribe in Coronado Cays, or Chula Vista Bayfront Park. Needless to say, a scope would presumably be essential. Good luck! There is at least one previous record for San Diego Bay. Such Bay records MIGHT be the result of a bird coming on board a fishing boat offshore at night and then getting tossed overboard once back at port.

Earlier in the morning at salt works Pond 20, we could not re-find the Semipalmated Sandpiper, but did have one juv Lesser Yellowlegs and a very surprising duo of JUVENILE Ruddy Turnstones, which breaks the previous 'early' arrival date of juveniles by NINE days.

--Paul Lehman, San Diego


Pin-tailed Whydah Harry Griffen Park

RICHARD CUTHBERTSON
 

Whydah continues at Harry Griffen.  Seen in the corner past the dog park at 7:45am at about 32.78831, -116.984.96.  Headed for the feeders at the green house.
Richard Cuthbertson


Semi Sandpiper at saltworks

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

On Tuesday morning there's a juvenile Semipalmated Sandpiper at the salt works at 6:15 a.m. on Pond 20, which they have just lowered for a couple days. This is the pond that's a third or half a mile east of the end of 13th, as viewed from the bike path. All the birds flushed and as of a half hour later I have been still unable to refind it. A lesser yellowlegs was here yesterday. A good scope and lots of patience is essential.

On Saturday morning, there were THREE White- breasted nuthatches on outer Point Loma, to add to the mini eruption. The last time there were multiple birds out there in July or August was about 20 years ago, which interestingly was also a drought year.

Paul Lehman, San Diego


Little Blue Heron in Ramona

Nancy Christensen
 

Of possible interest to those who bird the Ramona area- Paul Lehman tipped me off that Judy Winn had photographed a Little Blue Heron on Sunday at Dos Picos County Park. Still there today (Monday).

Other back country reports - Ramona Pond has 4 White-faced I is this morning. Lake Cuyamaca had two. The lower part of Cuyamaca is vegetation choked with a flat-leaved water lily type of thing. The muddy edge and vegetation blend together, but there is edge that should be attractive to things like snipe as they migrate.

Lake Henshaw, scoped from the road, was empty of shorebird life.

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb


One space open on Searcher 5 day Pelagic

David Povey
 

Hello Sea Birders,
I just got a note saying that there is a solo cancellation for the Searcher 5 day pelagic, Sept. 6th. to 10th., 2021.
These Searcher Natural History Pelagic Birding trips have produced a very nice mix of the regular Southern California seabirds. We also see species that tend to be further offshore. Such as Cook's Petrel, Long-tailed Jaeger, Arctic Tern and the like.
We also have a very good shot at some So. Cal. specialities such as Townsend's and Least Storm-Petrels, Red-billed Tropicbird, Guadalupe, Scripps's and Craveri's Murrelets, 
Then we always hope for a rarity Last year we got great looks at a Blue-footed and Nazca Booby, and a very close-in Laysan Albatross, Then there is always the possibility of a mega rarity!
A vaccination card or proof of negative covid test within 48hrs. required to board
See details at www.bajawhale.com. or call Celia at  619 226-2403. I wouldn' t wait too long to decide.  The 2022 trip is booked half full already.
I hope to see you out there,
Dave Povey



Robb Field Reddish Egret

Laurel Scott
 

There was a Reddish Egret on the southeast end of the grassy mudflat at 4:30 pm today. It was mostly still, not actively hunting.

Good birding 

Laurel Scott 
Mission Valley 


Elegant Tern at Chollas Reservoir

Philip Unitt
 

Dear friends,

 

When my bike ride today took me out to Chollas Reservoir I certainly didn’t expect to see any unusual birds. But there it was, sitting on the rocks near the east end of the lake with domestic mallards and pigeons: an Elegant Tern molting out of breeding plumage, with the forehead speckled black and white. At one point it got up and flew around the lake, dipping its bill in the water to drink after the fashion of a swallow or nighthawk and showing the characteristic pattern of the under surface of the primaries. I realize there are sightings in San Diego County still farther inland, at least one each at Lower Otay Lake, Sweetwater Reservoir, and Santee Lakes, but Chollas Reservoir is still over 5 miles from the nearest point of salt water on San Diego Bay, so still an unaccustomed spot for an Elegant Tern.

 

Good birding,

 

Philip Unitt

San Diego


Still No Blackpoll Warbler

Aedyn Loefke
 

An afternoon search (8/6) for yesterday’s male Blackpoll Warbler in the Sorrento Valley area failed to turn up anything of interest. Lots of Orange-crowns, but no Blackpoll.

There are several other tipu-lined parking lots in the immediate vicinity which it may be hiding out in, but given that it is most likely a summer wanderer it is also very likely that it is somewhere else entirely by now.

  —Aedyn Loefke 
Valley Center 

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