Headsail optimum size -362 #362Sabre


 

On Lake Erie’s usual 6-18 mph winds, I used to have 135% Genoa, then 140% Mylar Tapedrive.  Now for one year I sail a new 125% Dacron genoa and get fantastic helm balance on nearly every point of sail whereas before it was touchy to tune in.  I don’t feel like I lost noticeable speed with smaller sail. 

I guess with large main design on 362 54’ mast, this Genoa is perfect for all conditions. 

Brad
Sandusky, Ohio
Statfire ‘94 362


David Lochner
 

We dropped from a 150 to a 135 Genoa. Much easier to sail the boat. To compensate for the smaller size we went with a radial try sail cut. Last summer with our new main and the Genoa we were getting 3 knots in 4 knots of breeze on a reach. 


Dave
Second Star
S362 #113
Fair Haven, NY/Lake Ontario

On Jul 7, 2020, at 2:22 PM, Brad Jones <bjonesstarfire@...> wrote:

On Lake Erie’s usual 6-18 mph winds, I used to have 135% Genoa, then 140% Mylar Tapedrive.  Now for one year I sail a new 125% Dacron genoa and get fantastic helm balance on nearly every point of sail whereas before it was touchy to tune in.  I don’t feel like I lost noticeable speed with smaller sail. 

I guess with large main design on 362 54’ mast, this Genoa is perfect for all conditions. 

Brad
Sandusky, Ohio
Statfire ‘94 362



David Short, SV One Timer, 1997 362, Mt Desert, ME
 

Yes, I have a 150 that gets heavier & harder to winch in every year.  Appreciate the info as I ponder the boat, not me, getting older.

On 7/7/2020 3:36 PM, David Lochner via groups.io wrote:
We dropped from a 150 to a 135 Genoa. Much easier to sail the boat. To compensate for the smaller size we went with a radial try sail cut. Last summer with our new main and the Genoa we were getting 3 knots in 4 knots of breeze on a reach. 


Dave
Second Star
S362 #113
Fair Haven, NY/Lake Ontario

On Jul 7, 2020, at 2:22 PM, Brad Jones <bjonesstarfire@...> wrote:

On Lake Erie’s usual 6-18 mph winds, I used to have 135% Genoa, then 140% Mylar Tapedrive.  Now for one year I sail a new 125% Dacron genoa and get fantastic helm balance on nearly every point of sail whereas before it was touchy to tune in.  I don’t feel like I lost noticeable speed with smaller sail. 

I guess with large main design on 362 54’ mast, this Genoa is perfect for all conditions. 

Brad
Sandusky, Ohio
Statfire ‘94 362



--

Dave Short

dhs.short@...

 


Harry Keith
 

I had a 150 on my 34-I for as long as I owned her.  I talked with numerous sailmakers as I tried to talk myself into a new sail -- but never pulled the trigger.  However, I was sold on the idea of a 135 or so.  The argument is that upwind, there is little benefit of the larger sail -- but a lot more work for the crew.  Of course, racers only go upwind or downwind, and you'd never get one to downsize just 'cause it's easier to tack!  So maybe the argument is a little off.

The compelling part for me, is the "little benefit upwind" part.  On a broad reach, or deeper (on down to wing on wing), the big jib adds more to the equation.  But for us, with the apparent wind aft of 90 (OK, maybe aft of 80....) we had the asym up, and jib size didn't matter at all.

For us, and our sailing, the bigger jib added significant benefit from about 45 degrees, to about 80 degrees apparent.  Not a big window of benefit.  Hence, I would have bought a 135.  But we LOOOVE our asym -- took us under a month to get one for our new boat.  We literally fly it from as close as we can (OK, closer than we can) and deeper.  It's a rare day that we don't fly it.


On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 3:36 PM David Lochner via groups.io <davelochner=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
We dropped from a 150 to a 135 Genoa. Much easier to sail the boat. To compensate for the smaller size we went with a radial try sail cut. Last summer with our new main and the Genoa we were getting 3 knots in 4 knots of breeze on a reach. 


Dave
Second Star
S362 #113
Fair Haven, NY/Lake Ontario

On Jul 7, 2020, at 2:22 PM, Brad Jones <bjonesstarfire@...> wrote:

On Lake Erie’s usual 6-18 mph winds, I used to have 135% Genoa, then 140% Mylar Tapedrive.  Now for one year I sail a new 125% Dacron genoa and get fantastic helm balance on nearly every point of sail whereas before it was touchy to tune in.  I don’t feel like I lost noticeable speed with smaller sail. 

I guess with large main design on 362 54’ mast, this Genoa is perfect for all conditions. 

Brad
Sandusky, Ohio
Statfire ‘94 362



David Lochner
 

The bigger sail makes the most difference in lighter air. Above 10 knots the speed difference becomes smaller as wind increases and by the time the wind is in the upper teens, it time to start reefing either the main or the Genoa. With. The 135, reefing comes later. For the most part when we cruise, if we can’t sail at 5 knots then we motor because our distances are typically 40 miles a leg or more.


Dave
Second Star
S362 #113
Fair Haven, NY/Lake Ontario

On Jul 7, 2020, at 3:45 PM, Harry Keith <sailor11767@...> wrote:

I had a 150 on my 34-I for as long as I owned her.  I talked with numerous sailmakers as I tried to talk myself into a new sail -- but never pulled the trigger.  However, I was sold on the idea of a 135 or so.  The argument is that upwind, there is little benefit of the larger sail -- but a lot more work for the crew.  Of course, racers only go upwind or downwind, and you'd never get one to downsize just 'cause it's easier to tack!  So maybe the argument is a little off.

The compelling part for me, is the "little benefit upwind" part.  On a broad reach, or deeper (on down to wing on wing), the big jib adds more to the equation.  But for us, with the apparent wind aft of 90 (OK, maybe aft of 80....) we had the asym up, and jib size didn't matter at all.

For us, and our sailing, the bigger jib added significant benefit from about 45 degrees, to about 80 degrees apparent.  Not a big window of benefit.  Hence, I would have bought a 135.  But we LOOOVE our asym -- took us under a month to get one for our new boat.  We literally fly it from as close as we can (OK, closer than we can) and deeper.  It's a rare day that we don't fly it.

On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 3:36 PM David Lochner via groups.io <davelochner=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
We dropped from a 150 to a 135 Genoa. Much easier to sail the boat. To compensate for the smaller size we went with a radial try sail cut. Last summer with our new main and the Genoa we were getting 3 knots in 4 knots of breeze on a reach. 


Dave
Second Star
S362 #113
Fair Haven, NY/Lake Ontario

On Jul 7, 2020, at 2:22 PM, Brad Jones <bjonesstarfire@...> wrote:

On Lake Erie’s usual 6-18 mph winds, I used to have 135% Genoa, then 140% Mylar Tapedrive.  Now for one year I sail a new 125% Dacron genoa and get fantastic helm balance on nearly every point of sail whereas before it was touchy to tune in.  I don’t feel like I lost noticeable speed with smaller sail. 

I guess with large main design on 362 54’ mast, this Genoa is perfect for all conditions. 

Brad
Sandusky, Ohio
Statfire ‘94 362