Tuesday, Feb 8 @ 7:00 pm PST: Chris Conard "Changes in Local Bird Population over 25 years ()and it's not all depressing)


England
 

FEBRUARY 8, TUESDAY, 2022 7:00PM PST
Audubon General Meeting (Zoom)
Topic: Changes in local bird populations over 25 years (and it’s not all depressing)
Presenter: Chris Conard
Zoom Link: (Copy & Paste)
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85693245344?pwd=czMvZ2lyU2JrWnRITlR1UmVmQW9Odz09
or go to San Joaquin Audubon: https://www.sanjoaquinaudubon.org/programs/
If you’ve been birding for two decades or more, many things you took for granted about where and when certain birds were found have changed–some subtly and some quite profound. Chris began seriously birding and learning about local bird populations 25 years ago. That is a relatively short time, but long enough to notice significant changes, both in bird distribution and the habitat they depend on. There are as many stories of surprising resilience as there are of depressing loss. Working with Ed Pandolfino, Lily Douglas, and Tim Manolis on Sacramento County Breeding
Birds: A Tale of Two Atlases and Three Decades of Change , brought much of this into focus. Since the book’s publication earlier this year, Chris has been thinking about changes he’s observed throughout the seasons. Why are geese so much more numerous, Swainson’s Hawks holding their own, Say’s Phoebes and Western Bluebirds breeding where they hadn’t before? At the same time, Burrowing Owls and Loggerhead Shrikes are much harder to find. These changes are driven by human impacts, and some are not fully understood. There have been impressive restoration efforts, habitat loss, changes in winter temperatures, fog, and agricultural practices. Bird populations reflect these changes.
Chris Conard is a natural resource specialist at the Sacramento County Bufferlands and a longtime volunteer with Sacramento Audubon and the Central Valley Bird Club.
--
Alan England, Stockton