SJ Audubon Program on 3/9 (and another on 4/13), and new HOOT OWL


England
 

MARCH 09, TUESDAY 7:00PM PST
Topic: Changes in Bird Distribution and Population in the Central Valley over the last 80 Years: John Sterling
John will discuss the changes in our knowledge of bird distribution and population in the Central Valley since the publication of Grinnell and Miller’s book on California birds in the 1940s. Loss of habitats, creation of new habitats, reduction of ranges, invasions of new species and other topics will be explored as we reconcile the fact that more species are detected now than prior to the book’s publication.
John has been a hard core birder in California since he was shown a Pileated Woodpecker in 5th grade camp in 1971. He is a professional ornithologist and has worked for the Smithsonian Institution, US Forest Service research stations, HT Harvey & Associates, Arizona and Oregon state universities among other organizations since 1981. John has traveled extensively throughout California learning about local bird distribution and is an authority on that state’s avifauna. In 2015 he set the California’s new big year record with 501 species and has many big day records as well. He has traveled internationally as a guide and ornithologist for many institutions including projects as a Smithsonian ornithologist to Mexico, Ecuador, Peru, The Philippines, Sumatra, Canada and Russia. John currently has his own company, Sterling Wildlife Biology (www.sterlingbirds.com), specializing in international birding tours, birding classes, research and environmental consulting for The Nature Conservancy, National Audubon’s International Alliance Program, CA Dept. of Water Resources among other organizations.
APRIL 13, TUESDAY 7:00PM PST
Topic:Trees in Trouble
Presentor: Daniel Mathews
Daniel will discuss his book, Trees in Trouble, about the effects of wildfires, insect infestations, and climate change on Western forests. He presents hopeful solutions to succeed in sustaining our forests through the challenging transition to a new environment.
Daniel Mathews is the author of Natural History of the Pacific Northwest Mountains, Rocky Mountain Natural History, and Cascade-Olympic Natural History. During a career of learning and writing about the natural history of western North America, he has backpacked far and wide, watched for fires from Desolation Peak Lookout, watched a forty-foot fir crash onto his family’s house in a storm, and lived for years in a forest cabin without electricity, heating with firewood and writing by kerosene lamp. He lives in Portland, Oregon.
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Alan England, Stockton