NW San Joaquin Co.


Jim Rowoth
 

All,

You may have noticed Ben Stalheim's eBird report yesterday (19 Mar) of a male Garganey at Staten Island, unfortunately in an area that mere mortals (i.e., non-employees of The Nature Conservancy) do not have access.  Grrr.

Being the skeptical Missourian that I am, I decided to take a chance and drive out this afternoon to see if I could find it from the publicly accessible road. After all, birds  have wings, so it might have moved to a different area on Staten Island.  I figured that this particular individual is likely the same bird that has spent the past 2 winters at Bridgeway Island Pond in West Sacramento, last report in eBird on 31 Jan.  Then on 26 Feb a male Garganey was reported in rural Colusa Co and hasn't been reported in eBird since 17 March.  Oddly enough, two days later one shows up at Staten Island.  Coincidence?  You go figure. 

Anyway, I saw many of the same species of birds on Ben's 19 Mar report, except the Marbled Godwits and the Garganey.  There is, however, a Tundra Swan out there that apparently was left behind by his buddies, lots of Cinnamon and Green-winged Teals (no Blue-wings).  If anyone else tries this, afternoon light is best on this only remaining wet area along the public road.  A scope is highly recommended, and there is no need to drive down the rest of the unpaved public portion to the collapsing water tower since there is NO WATER further south--it's all plowed dirt.  

On my way back to Stockton, I stopped by "Pond 5" along Walnut Grove Rd.  This is a trashy area (gate locked), which is actually a continuation of the series of ponds that make up White Slough Wildlife Area just west of Flag City.  I've seen it much, much worse in the past, so I walked in and checked out the west side of the pond by following a deer trail.  A nice selection of birds, but nothing unexpected except for an adult Bald Eagle, which swooped down and grabbed a fish and flew off to the SW.  After I got home, I found one tick on me--so far.  If anyone else tries this seldom visited area, as I said the gate is closed but there is room to pull off the busy road there.  

Trying to stay sane in these crazy times!

Jim Rowoth
Stockton




 
--
Jim Rowoth
Stockton, CA


Pat Croft
 

All. I am glad to see one other went to Staten Island.  I went in the  morning.  The light is probably better in the afternoon.  I took my scope & I am glad I did.  Jim is right it is best to stay on the paved road.  Dave & pat

On Mar 20, 2020, at 9:27 PM, Jim Rowoth <rowoth@...> wrote:

All,

You may have noticed Ben Stalheim's eBird report yesterday (19 Mar) of a male Garganey at Staten Island, unfortunately in an area that mere mortals (i.e., non-employees of The Nature Conservancy) do not have access.  Grrr.

Being the skeptical Missourian that I am, I decided to take a chance and drive out this afternoon to see if I could find it from the publicly accessible road. After all, birds  have wings, so it might have moved to a different area on Staten Island.  I figured that this particular individual is likely the same bird that has spent the past 2 winters at Bridgeway Island Pond in West Sacramento, last report in eBird on 31 Jan.  Then on 26 Feb a male Garganey was reported in rural Colusa Co and hasn't been reported in eBird since 17 March.  Oddly enough, two days later one shows up at Staten Island.  Coincidence?  You go figure. 

Anyway, I saw many of the same species of birds on Ben's 19 Mar report, except the Marbled Godwits and the Garganey.  There is, however, a Tundra Swan out there that apparently was left behind by his buddies, lots of Cinnamon and Green-winged Teals (no Blue-wings).  If anyone else tries this, afternoon light is best on this only remaining wet area along the public road.  A scope is highly recommended, and there is no need to drive down the rest of the unpaved public portion to the collapsing water tower since there is NO WATER further south--it's all plowed dirt.  

On my way back to Stockton, I stopped by "Pond 5" along Walnut Grove Rd.  This is a trashy area (gate locked), which is actually a continuation of the series of ponds that make up White Slough Wildlife Area just west of Flag City.  I've seen it much, much worse in the past, so I walked in and checked out the west side of the pond by following a deer trail.  A nice selection of birds, but nothing unexpected except for an adult Bald Eagle, which swooped down and grabbed a fish and flew off to the SW.  After I got home, I found one tick on me--so far.  If anyone else tries this seldom visited area, as I said the gate is closed but there is room to pull off the busy road there.  

Trying to stay sane in these crazy times!

Jim Rowoth
Stockton




 
--
Jim Rowoth
Stockton, CA