Bear Creek Bike Trail/Faklis Park - a little excitement on a cold day


Kurt Mize
 

Nice birds and nice write-up, Susan!


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On Tuesday, January 26, 2021, 11:36 AM, Susan Schneider <susanschneider7@...> wrote:

Despite the frosty weather (31 degrees when I hit the trail), some birds were singing!  I started out with 4 White Pelicans on the creek down towards the Paradise Point marina.  One vee of Snow Geese flew over, and either Cacklings or Greater White-fronted were further away, never close enough for me to be sure.  A few Sandhill Cranes were visible. 

As the sun warmed up, Song Sparrows began singing, and I was pleased to spot a Bewick's Wren singing also - first time this year.  That one got another one countersinging a short distance away, and the second also hopped up into view.  Eventually one Marsh Wren sang briefly.  That was exciting, but more was to come: As I hiked alongside Faklis Park, a bird suddenly plunge-dived into the water with a big splash, only 60 feet away - coming seemingly from out of nowhere.  I had heard a Kingfisher previously, and expected that bird to emerge, but this diver proved instead to be the local Osprey, emerging without a fish.  It landed on one of the trees across the waterway, shaking its wings.

Other highlights included Purple Finch, American Pipit, Hermit Thrush, and Cooper's Hawk.

As I ended my hike, a flock of a dozen Common Goldeneye foraged well to the west, along toward Paradise Point where the pelicans had been earlier.  This is a large number for this hotspot. The Osprey also dove again, further off this time, again unsuccessfully. 

Good birding,
Susan

--
Susan M. Schneider, PhD
Climate activist, behavioral psychologist, and award-winning author of The Science of Consequences
http://www.scienceofconsequences.com

“The impact of human-induced warming is worse than previously feared, and only drastic coordinated action will keep the damage short of catastrophe.”
- Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, October 2018 report (authored by 91 scientists from 40 countries, based on over 6,000 scientific references)
It's not too late.


Susan Schneider <susanschneider7@...>
 

Despite the frosty weather (31 degrees when I hit the trail), some birds were singing!  I started out with 4 White Pelicans on the creek down towards the Paradise Point marina.  One vee of Snow Geese flew over, and either Cacklings or Greater White-fronted were further away, never close enough for me to be sure.  A few Sandhill Cranes were visible. 

As the sun warmed up, Song Sparrows began singing, and I was pleased to spot a Bewick's Wren singing also - first time this year.  That one got another one countersinging a short distance away, and the second also hopped up into view.  Eventually one Marsh Wren sang briefly.  That was exciting, but more was to come: As I hiked alongside Faklis Park, a bird suddenly plunge-dived into the water with a big splash, only 60 feet away - coming seemingly from out of nowhere.  I had heard a Kingfisher previously, and expected that bird to emerge, but this diver proved instead to be the local Osprey, emerging without a fish.  It landed on one of the trees across the waterway, shaking its wings.

Other highlights included Purple Finch, American Pipit, Hermit Thrush, and Cooper's Hawk.

As I ended my hike, a flock of a dozen Common Goldeneye foraged well to the west, along toward Paradise Point where the pelicans had been earlier.  This is a large number for this hotspot. The Osprey also dove again, further off this time, again unsuccessfully. 

Good birding,
Susan

--
Susan M. Schneider, PhD
Climate activist, behavioral psychologist, and award-winning author of The Science of Consequences
http://www.scienceofconsequences.com

“The impact of human-induced warming is worse than previously feared, and only drastic coordinated action will keep the damage short of catastrophe.”
- Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, October 2018 report (authored by 91 scientists from 40 countries, based on over 6,000 scientific references)
It's not too late.