Date   

Re: Short-eared Owl

Liz West
 

Along Waverly south of Flood.

Liz

On Feb 12, 2021, at 3:15 PM, Liz West <elizwest@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

SJ Birders,

I just saw a Short-eared Owl in the swale just south of Waverly Rd it flew along ways off when the rancher on an ATV came by. I think it might return.

Liz West
Galt





Re: Short-eared Owl

Pat Paternostro
 

Thanks Liz. 
I’m heading out there tomorrow. 


From: SJBirds@groups.io <SJBirds@groups.io> on behalf of Liz West <elizwest@...>
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 3:14:04 PM
To: sjbirds@groups.io <sjbirds@groups.io>
Subject: [SJBirds] Short-eared Owl
 
SJ Birders,

I just saw a Short-eared Owl in the swale just south of Waverly Rd it flew along ways off when the rancher on an ATV came by. I think it might return.

Liz West
Galt






Short-eared Owl

Liz West
 

SJ Birders,

I just saw a Short-eared Owl in the swale just south of Waverly Rd it flew along ways off when the rancher on an ATV came by. I think it might return.

Liz West
Galt


Join a global event: The Great Backyard Bird Count (Feb 12-15)

England
 

Cornell Ornithology Lab + National Audubon + Birds Canada = The Great Backyard Bird Count

https://www.birdcount.org/
--
Alan England, Stockton


Re: SJ Audubon General Meeting This Week and Upcoming

Pat Croft
 


burrowing owl seen on woodbridge rd preserve Feb 6, 2021 seen by pat & dave croft


SJ Audubon General Meeting This Week and Upcoming

England
 

FEBRUARY 9, 2021 7:00pm

Join the meeting by clicking on the Zoom link below

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81684009038?pwd=aVQvaFdaYVRBdW5uekdiTkUwQjRkZz09


Birds and Fire in the Sierra presented by Lynn Schofield

Wildfires are an important part of many ecosystems around the world. Fires provide an opportunity for new growth, to return nutrients to the soil, and to create a wholly unique type of habitat. Many species are adapted for these ever-changing systems, and they have developed a wide variety of strategies for making the best of the post-fire habitat. However, these systems exist in a delicate balance. Recently, forest fires have been increasing in size, intensity, and frequency due to human activities, and even fire-adapted species are struggling to keep up. In this talk we discuss how animals survive and thrive in a system defined by fire and what we can do to help protect the balance of these special ecosystems.

Lynn Schofield is a biologist for the Institute for Bird Populations. Her research covers a diversity of topics including bird migration, forest fire ecology, and wetland conservation. In addition to using her research to help inform effective conservation strategies, Lynn also works to help make connections with nature accessible to all. She is one of the core members of the Cal Falcons social media project, a frequent trip leader for the Bay Area chapter of the Feminist Bird Club and a long-time volunteer for the Golden Gate Raptor Observatory.

 

================================= 

MARCH 9, 2021 7:00pm

Changes in Bird Distribution and Population in the Central Valley over the last 80 Years presented by John Sterling

 

John will discuss the changes in our knowledge of bird distribution and population in the Central Valley since the publication of Grinnell and Miller’s book on California birds in the 1940s. Loss of habitats, creation of new habitats, reduction of ranges, invasions of new species and other topics will be explored as we reconcile the fact that more species are detected now than prior to the book’s publication.

John has been a hard core birder in California since he was shown a Pileated Woodpecker in 5th grade camp in 1971.  He is a professional ornithologist and has worked for the Smithsonian Institution, US Forest Service research stations, HT Harvey & Associates, Arizona and Oregon state universities among other organizations since 1981.  John has traveled extensively throughout California learning about local bird distribution and is an authority on that state’s avifauna. In 2015 he set the California's new big year record with 501 species and has many big day records as well. He has traveled internationally as a guide and ornithologist for many institutions including projects as a Smithsonian ornithologist to Mexico, Ecuador, Peru, The Philippines, Sumatra, Canada and Russia. John currently has his own company, Sterling Wildlife Biology (www.sterlingbirds.com),  specializing in international birding tours, birding classes, research and environmental consulting for The Nature Conservancy, National Audubon’s International Alliance Program, CA Dept. of Water Resources among other organizations.


Re: Lodi Lake

Pat Paternostro
 

In a follow up to my first email. LL has been drained so the egrets and gulls are feeding in the puddles.  Will be fun counting them on Saturday. 
Pat 


From: SJBirds@groups.io <SJBirds@groups.io> on behalf of Pat Paternostro <BRONCOS30@...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 3, 2021 8:09:54 AM
To: sjbirds@groups.io <sjbirds@groups.io>
Subject: [SJBirds] Lodi Lake
 
Friends 
I plan to bird Lodi Lake nature area this Saturday (with masking and social distancing in place).  
If you would like to join me, I will begin on Laurel Ave at 8am. 
Thanks 
Pat 


Lodi Lake

Pat Paternostro
 

Friends 
I plan to bird Lodi Lake nature area this Saturday (with masking and social distancing in place).  
If you would like to join me, I will begin on Laurel Ave at 8am. 
Thanks 
Pat 


DIY Birding

Pat Paternostro
 

Birders 
Join me tonight at 7pm for our first 2021 DIY birding trip; this trip will be Flood and Waverly Roads. 
Zoom information can be found on our website and other social media platforms. 
Pat 


Re: Yard Birds

Judy Kane
 

Wow, must have been beautiful! I was treated to two varied thrush calling to each other on Mosher Slough (south side) just east of the footbridge at Yarmouth this morning. 

Judy 

On Mon, Feb 1, 2021 at 11:54 AM k foley <kaseyfoley@...> wrote:
The past three days have been very birdy in our yard. We've had Townsend's (2), Orange-crowned (2) and Black-throated gray warblers, Red-breasted nuthatch, Purple finch, Pine siskin, multiple hawks (Red-tailed, Red-shouldered, Cooper's and Kestrel) throughout the yard and extremely amorous Nuttal's woodpeckers, Anna's hummingbirds, and Black phoebes. Keep a lookout in your trees, there is a lot of movement.

Good birding,
Kasey

--
Kasey Foley
Stockton, CA

--
M. Judith Kane
209-639-1951


Yard Birds

k foley
 

The past three days have been very birdy in our yard. We've had Townsend's (2), Orange-crowned (2) and Black-throated gray warblers, Red-breasted nuthatch, Purple finch, Pine siskin, multiple hawks (Red-tailed, Red-shouldered, Cooper's and Kestrel) throughout the yard and extremely amorous Nuttal's woodpeckers, Anna's hummingbirds, and Black phoebes. Keep a lookout in your trees, there is a lot of movement.

Good birding,
Kasey

--
Kasey Foley
Stockton, CA


Re: This Tuesday, 2/2, join San Joaquin Audubon for our next DIY (do it yourself) field trip.

Susan Schneider <susanschneider7@...>
 

And a follow-up note of caution:  After a rain, the unpaved portion of Waverly can become impassable for normal passenger vehicles.  I ventured out yesterday, and wimped out at attempting it - very wet and potholed.  On the other hand, I would guess that better-equipped vehicles could manage without much difficulty.  And of course, the paved roads are no problem.

Good birding,
Susan


On Sun, Jan 31, 2021 at 1:37 PM England via groups.io <wdchkgsqrl=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

When:  Tuesday, February 2 at 7:00 p.m.

Plan:    Discuss this month’s trip:  Flood & Waverly Road

 

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85038076039?pwd=OEFSazJxSHd1Ujd6bTcyVXMvdzY2dz09

 

We hope to see you there.

====================

Here’s how it works:

• SESSION I (Virtual) (Tuesday, 2/2 @ 7:00 pm) A Zoom meeting with the field trip leader.

• SESSION 1+ is the DIY part: before the next Zoom meeting, you visit the birding location, where you’ll look for the listed birds and other wildlife. Take binoculars and a bird field guide if you have them and keep a list of your observations. Please follow all COVID-19 precautions when you are in the field: wearing masks, observing social distancing and hand washing.

• SESSION 2 (Virtual) Usually the third week after the first meeting, participants join again on Zoom, sharing what they found, and there will be an introduction to the next DIY field trip location.

--
Alan England, Stockton



--
Susan M. Schneider, PhD
Climate activist, behavioral psychologist, and award-winning author of The Science of Consequences
http://www.scienceofconsequences.com

“The impact of human-induced warming is worse than previously feared, and only drastic coordinated action will keep the damage short of catastrophe.”
- Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, October 2018 report (authored by 91 scientists from 40 countries, based on over 6,000 scientific references)
It's not too late.


This Tuesday, 2/2, join San Joaquin Audubon for our next DIY (do it yourself) field trip.

England
 

When:  Tuesday, February 2 at 7:00 p.m.

Plan:    Discuss this month’s trip:  Flood & Waverly Road

 

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85038076039?pwd=OEFSazJxSHd1Ujd6bTcyVXMvdzY2dz09

 

We hope to see you there.

====================

Here’s how it works:

• SESSION I (Virtual) (Tuesday, 2/2 @ 7:00 pm) A Zoom meeting with the field trip leader.

• SESSION 1+ is the DIY part: before the next Zoom meeting, you visit the birding location, where you’ll look for the listed birds and other wildlife. Take binoculars and a bird field guide if you have them and keep a list of your observations. Please follow all COVID-19 precautions when you are in the field: wearing masks, observing social distancing and hand washing.

• SESSION 2 (Virtual) Usually the third week after the first meeting, participants join again on Zoom, sharing what they found, and there will be an introduction to the next DIY field trip location.

--
Alan England, Stockton


Geese on the move

Susan Schneider <susanschneider7@...>
 

I imagine it's just local movement, but two big vees of geese just headed north over my place in NE Stockton:  one of Snow Geese, one of Greater White-fronteds.

Good birding,
Susan

--
Susan M. Schneider, PhD
Climate activist, behavioral psychologist, and award-winning author of The Science of Consequences
http://www.scienceofconsequences.com

“The impact of human-induced warming is worse than previously feared, and only drastic coordinated action will keep the damage short of catastrophe.”
- Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, October 2018 report (authored by 91 scientists from 40 countries, based on over 6,000 scientific references)
It's not too late.


Lodi

Pat Croft
 

My wife & I decided to drive around Lodi to parks & one church that have catch basins. The 4 sites with catch basins were full of water. That was Beckman Park, Peterson Park, Glaves Park & Gracepoint Church. It was feast or famine. Peterson Park had the most. 98 curlews, 6 great egrets, mallards, Greater yellow legs, & so on. Beckman park had Great, snowy & cattle egrets. Plus mallards & 2 killdeer. Gracepoint had 2 mallards & Glaves Park to 2 mallards & about 35 curlew flew over.

Lodi Lake was closed due to downed trees. We saw quite a few downed trees in Lodi also downed branches. IAW a real mess in some places. Dave & Pat


Re: Bear Creek Bike Trail/Faklis Park - a little excitement on a cold day

Kurt Mize
 

Nice birds and nice write-up, Susan!


Sent from the all new Aol app for iOS

On Tuesday, January 26, 2021, 11:36 AM, Susan Schneider <susanschneider7@...> wrote:

Despite the frosty weather (31 degrees when I hit the trail), some birds were singing!  I started out with 4 White Pelicans on the creek down towards the Paradise Point marina.  One vee of Snow Geese flew over, and either Cacklings or Greater White-fronted were further away, never close enough for me to be sure.  A few Sandhill Cranes were visible. 

As the sun warmed up, Song Sparrows began singing, and I was pleased to spot a Bewick's Wren singing also - first time this year.  That one got another one countersinging a short distance away, and the second also hopped up into view.  Eventually one Marsh Wren sang briefly.  That was exciting, but more was to come: As I hiked alongside Faklis Park, a bird suddenly plunge-dived into the water with a big splash, only 60 feet away - coming seemingly from out of nowhere.  I had heard a Kingfisher previously, and expected that bird to emerge, but this diver proved instead to be the local Osprey, emerging without a fish.  It landed on one of the trees across the waterway, shaking its wings.

Other highlights included Purple Finch, American Pipit, Hermit Thrush, and Cooper's Hawk.

As I ended my hike, a flock of a dozen Common Goldeneye foraged well to the west, along toward Paradise Point where the pelicans had been earlier.  This is a large number for this hotspot. The Osprey also dove again, further off this time, again unsuccessfully. 

Good birding,
Susan

--
Susan M. Schneider, PhD
Climate activist, behavioral psychologist, and award-winning author of The Science of Consequences
http://www.scienceofconsequences.com

“The impact of human-induced warming is worse than previously feared, and only drastic coordinated action will keep the damage short of catastrophe.”
- Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, October 2018 report (authored by 91 scientists from 40 countries, based on over 6,000 scientific references)
It's not too late.


Bear Creek Bike Trail/Faklis Park - a little excitement on a cold day

Susan Schneider <susanschneider7@...>
 

Despite the frosty weather (31 degrees when I hit the trail), some birds were singing!  I started out with 4 White Pelicans on the creek down towards the Paradise Point marina.  One vee of Snow Geese flew over, and either Cacklings or Greater White-fronted were further away, never close enough for me to be sure.  A few Sandhill Cranes were visible. 

As the sun warmed up, Song Sparrows began singing, and I was pleased to spot a Bewick's Wren singing also - first time this year.  That one got another one countersinging a short distance away, and the second also hopped up into view.  Eventually one Marsh Wren sang briefly.  That was exciting, but more was to come: As I hiked alongside Faklis Park, a bird suddenly plunge-dived into the water with a big splash, only 60 feet away - coming seemingly from out of nowhere.  I had heard a Kingfisher previously, and expected that bird to emerge, but this diver proved instead to be the local Osprey, emerging without a fish.  It landed on one of the trees across the waterway, shaking its wings.

Other highlights included Purple Finch, American Pipit, Hermit Thrush, and Cooper's Hawk.

As I ended my hike, a flock of a dozen Common Goldeneye foraged well to the west, along toward Paradise Point where the pelicans had been earlier.  This is a large number for this hotspot. The Osprey also dove again, further off this time, again unsuccessfully. 

Good birding,
Susan

--
Susan M. Schneider, PhD
Climate activist, behavioral psychologist, and award-winning author of The Science of Consequences
http://www.scienceofconsequences.com

“The impact of human-induced warming is worse than previously feared, and only drastic coordinated action will keep the damage short of catastrophe.”
- Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, October 2018 report (authored by 91 scientists from 40 countries, based on over 6,000 scientific references)
It's not too late.


Loon and trespassing--PLEASE READ

Jim Rowoth
 

Birders—both resident and visiting:

I shouldn’t have to do this, but I am continuing to see reports that show clear evidence of TRESPASSING.  Please don’t kill the goose that lays the golden egg!

The ONLY area of Bouldin Island that is available to birding is the Highway 12 corridor—and as you know, that high traffic road is dangerous and stopping anywhere is not advised.  Any and all roads leading off the highway are private property (whether signed or not) and are absolutely, positively off-limits to the general public—and that means us, the birdwatching community.

The ONLY area of Staten Island that is available to birding is Staten Island Road as far south as the equipment shed and collapsing water tower on the west side of the road.   There is a sign there that clearly states that public access ends there.  The road further south and all levees are absolutely, positively off-limits to the general public—and that means us, the birdwatching community.  

Westgate Landing County Park is open to the public (day use fee) and allows access to the levee at the park.  Where the actual property boundary lies is not clear to me, however.

Access directly under the Tower Park bridge is fuzzy, but if you choose this site, I again recommend that you make it a brief visit (get the bird and go), and that you not turn it into a party—the fewer visitors at a time the better.  Too bad if you can’t get a “gallery quality” photo. C’est la vie.

As David Yee stated in his post on 01/17/21, good relations with property owners/management at Bouldin Island and Staten Island are essential for continued access by San Joaquin Audubon for our annual Christmas Bird Count and other bird surveys.  Please don’t spoil this for our local birding community!





--
Jim Rowoth
Stockton, CA


White Slough Wildlife Area

Jim Rowoth
 

I visited White Slough Wildlife Area yesterday afternoon for the first time this year.  The dirt entry road was gated by the state Dept of Water Resources, which has jurisdiction over this area, last summer, so I parked at the N end of the frontage road next to the yellow gate and walked 1/2 mile west to the N end of Pond 9.  This dirt road remains a disaster—deeply rutted and riddled with deep potholes, festooned along most of its length with an appalling amount of litter/garbage.  I’ve attached some photos.  

I only birded the N end of the first pond (Pond 9), so I did not visit Cottonwood Alley (S end); eBird report can be viewed at https://ebird.org/checklist/S79666271.  I clearly need to go back and spend more time.

--
Jim Rowoth
Stockton, CA


Flood Road Longspurs

Ralph
 

I haven't seen this reported on any listserv yet so I will post it. Yesterday Lucas Stephenson found two LAPLAND LONGSPURS and a CHESTNUT-COLLARED LONGSPUR on Flood Road. I do not have a more specific location than that, but I went out looking this afternoon. I ran into Pat Paternostro on Waverly Road, Pat told me that he had not seen any longspurs but did say that he had seen a huge flock of American Pipits, Horned Larks, sparrows, etc. I found the flock Pat was talking about about 1 mile south of Flood Road. I could not pick out any longspurs but heard a "rattle" type call when the flock flushed and flew over the road just before I left. I am not certain that it was a longspur, as I am not very familiar with their calls, but it sounded like one. I never did pick up the bird visually, however.

Also on Waverly Road this afternoon, just after I talked to Pat I saw a beautiful ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK just south of Flood and on the way back I saw an adult Bald Eagle flying east along Flood, it crossed over Waverly and flew off over the hills.

Ralph Baker, Riverbank

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