Date   

Backyard activity

jimallan927@...
 

The last couple of days have been good through my kitchen window. I have had two pairs of Bullocks Orioles coming several times a day to one of my hummingbird feeders, the feeder is an old style with inch long sip tubes. I cut an orange and a grapefruit for them, but the just stand on the fruit and drink nectar. Today, bush tits were feeding on the Drosophila that were attracted to the fruit. The Munia continue to be reliable visitors. If anyone would like to add them to a life list, I am sure we could maintain social distancing while you observed them, I also have a 2300 step trail through my wood lot that can be worthwhile. Let me know if interested. New today, a Wilson's Warbler feeding on mealworm suet, and a Pipit. I have several nesting pairs of birds on the property; Black Phoebes, two pair of Robins, (pipped egg shells on the ground yesterday), a pair of California Towhees, a pair of Nuthatches returning to a bluebird box for the third year in a row, I have not seen their nest, but a pair of Black-headed Grosbeaks that were coming together and now both still appear, but separately, and oak titmice, collared doves, scrub jays, house finches and starlings. The robins make a lot of use of emu feathers from my emu pen in their nest.


Re: Covid19 birding

k foley
 

It’s a beautiful road, glad you visited your friend.
Kasey

On Apr 15, 2020, at 2:48 PM, Pat Croft <Patndavid@comcast.net> wrote:

All: Thanks to kasey foley pat & I visited the grand oaks inn on buena vista rd. We know the owners. Lots of nesting brewers black birds & house finches. Swainson’s hawks flying doing their mating rituals. A kestrel taking a mouse to it’s nest.

We toured buena vista road. We saw a red tailed hawk on its nest. Lots of Common ravens & turkey vultures. We also saw a red tailed hawk carrying a snake in it’s talons.


We saw that kasey foley on e bird had birded buena vista a little while ago so that gave us the idea to visit our friends at the grand oaks inn to bird their property. Dave & Pat croft

--
Kasey Foley
Stockton, CA


Covid19 birding

Pat Croft
 

All: Thanks to kasey foley pat & I visited the grand oaks inn on buena vista rd. We know the owners. Lots of nesting brewers black birds & house finches. Swainson’s hawks flying doing their mating rituals. A kestrel taking a mouse to it’s nest.

We toured buena vista road. We saw a red tailed hawk on its nest. Lots of Common ravens & turkey vultures. We also saw a red tailed hawk carrying a snake in it’s talons.


We saw that kasey foley on e bird had birded buena vista a little while ago so that gave us the idea to visit our friends at the grand oaks inn to bird their property. Dave & Pat croft


Laughlin Park today

Kurt Mize
 

All:

I had my FOS Nashville Warbler at Laughlin Park this morning. Also of note were my FOS (at the park) Brown Cowbirds, my first EVER (I think) Great Horned Owl, a male Black-throated Gray Warbler, a Pacific Slope Flycatcher, and two Orange-crowned Warblers.

Good birding,

Kurt


Birding

Pat Croft
 

we visited Hutchin’s Street Square being inspired by Pat Paternsotro’s visit yesterday. Nothing new. We saw Nuthall’s Woodpeckers & heard their loud pecking. Many Robins & Starlings. Singing mockingbirds. So on. We also learned you have to visit the Lodi Wilderness earlier. Just too many people to keep the 6 foot social distancing. Because of that we shortened our walk. highlights were 2 caspian terns flying over the lake. One female common merganser in the river. One wrentit. Singing house wrens & so on. Dave & Pat


Socially distant birding--Saturday

Jim Rowoth
 

I walked over to Angel Cruz Park this morning, hoping to find more activity than on previous visits, which have been later in the day. But nope, not much difference, other than the presence of a small noisy flock of Pine Siskins high in a redwood tree.

After lunch, I drove out to Woodbridge Road, with the goal of checking out yet another pond that is technically within the White Slough Wildlife Area—Pond 6. (I have checked out Ponds 5—off Walnut Grove Rd--and Pond 7—off Cotta Rd--in previous weeks). We’ve all passed it every time we visit Woodbridge Road. It is that long, narrow ditch and strip of trees on the north side, between the North Unit and the South Unit of the crane reserve. The former breeding facility for the Riparian Brush Rabbit was at the far north end of this area. It appears to be rarely visited, except for an occasional hunter. Parking is at the SW corner of this long, narrow complex—we’ve all seen the shot-up sign. The weeds are quite thick, but you can bushwhack your way in and find traces of vehicle tracks to follow along the west side.

Nothing outrageous or unexpected birdwise, but I had a couple of Bullock’s Orioles, some Western Kingbirds, a very spiffy Myrtle Warbler, plus five large, obvious nest platforms. Two of these were clearly occupied—one with an adult Red-tailed Hawk, another with one adult Great Horned Owl and one large, fluffy nestling.

I don’t expect to see anything noteworthy in my yard today, since one of my 5 neighbors across the fence has dismantled our shared, decrepit fence and will be replacing it over the next few days.






--
Jim Rowoth
Stockton, CA


Laughlin Park today

Kurt Mize
 

All:

I had my FOS Bullock’s Oriole and a couple of Black-throated Gray Warblers at Laughlin Park this morning. Also had a continuing Red-breasted Nuthatch. Otherwise pretty slow.

Good birding.

Kurt


This past week

Jim Rowoth
 

I see that I am remiss in posting to sjbirds this week, so I’ll try to summarize here now.

I visited a variety of under-birded parks in north Stockton (most of which were devoid of people) this week as follows:

Monday
Loch Lomond Park—Best birds were the small flock of very vocal Pine Siskins and less vocal Chipping Sparrows. Also vocal pair of Swainson’s Hawks. I avoided the NW corner of the park due to the presence of a homeless encampment under the bridge.

Cortez Park—The expected cast of characters; a quick, surgical visit just to get the park on the eBird map--I only spent 10 minutes here.

Stuart Gibbons Park—Highlights were Cooper’s and Swainson’s Hawks, as well as singing lutescens Orange-crowned Warbler.

Anderson Park/Emil Seifert Center—Highlights were Red-breasted Nuthatch and flock of 74 American Pipits.

I had a Wilson’s Warbler spend the afternoon in my yard, along with the usual cast of characters. I thought I might have heard a Rufous Hummer, but could not confirm it. I had had both a male and female of this species in my privets on Apr 2.

Tuesday
The Wilson’s continued in my yard in the morning.

Angel Cruz Park—No binoculars, late in the afternoon. Best birds were heard-only Ruby-crowned Kinglet and resident Acorn Woodpeckers. No trace of the RB Nuthatches and Townsend’s Warbler that I had had on Mar 29—but what do you expect since I bins-less!

Wednesday
In need of some real exercise, so I headed to White Slough (walked close to 5 miles along heavily overgrown trails). I carefully drove my rental car out—the road remains a disaster, and I noticed that new junk has been delivered. Best birds were one female Common Goldeneye (first pond, “Pond 9”), Common Gallinule (Pond 10), spontaneously calling (i.e., no playback) Black Rail at its usual location; heard from trails on both north and south edge of Pond 11, Forster’s Tern (Pond 10), very active GB Heron and Gt Egret rookery on W edge of Pond 11, multiple Swainson’ Hawks, at least 8 Western Kingbirds (my first of the year), and 3 Bullock’s Orioles. The Great Horned Owl remains on its nest.

Thursday
I remained in my yard. Same old same old.

today
I visited the Stockton Rural Cemetery. I figured everyone was dead there already, so OK to visit during coronavirus emergency. I found one old owl pellet under their usual tree, but no owls. I have failed to find them on my last several visits, so I suppose they are no longer there. Anyway, I came across a coyote, who quickly skeedaddled once he saw me. Avian highlights: pair of courting Swainson’s Hawks, a trio of squeeky Western Kingbirds, SIX Red-breasted Nuthatches—at one point, I had 4 in the same binocular view, 13 noisily zipping Pine Siskins, one snappy-looking Chipping Sparrow, and one male Black-throated Gray Warbler. Lots of the usual stuff as well.

My back yard continues the same. No new characters have arrived, but I was entertained by a trio of birds in my birdbath earlier this afternoon, all laughing and vigorously splashing around together—Golden-crowned Sparrow, Lesser Goldfinch, and lutescens Orange-crowned Warbler.

Jim Rowoth
Stockton




--
Jim Rowoth
Stockton, CA


Lodi Lake - Nashville Warbler

Pat Paternostro
 

Greetings 
I walked the nature area this morning.  Among the 40+ species was a FOS Nashville Warbler.  There were also a couple singing Wilson’s Warblers. 
Enjoy the weekend and be safe. 
Pat 


Yard birding

Pat Croft
 

to all: I went out to my front yard to empty trash this morning & just sat. I saw 2 western blue birds gathering nesting material right in front of me. I saw a Scrub jay digging in my yard probably looking for a hidden acorn. I can watch my backyard feeders from my back windows while eating a meal or watching TV. These are examples of fellow shut in birders to use their imaginations to watch birds. Everytime I have to leave the house I look for birds. Like on the way to the store & so on. Just suggestions to take away the boredom. Yesterday after running an errand we drove around Lodi Lake & birded from the car. The weather was cold & cloudy & wet. Dave


Lodi Lake Today

k foley
 

Rich and I visited Lodi Lake today and saw all our old friends except the Varied thrush 😐. We did not see any migrants, in fact, it seemed extraordinary quiet today but we got to be outside to bird AND I got to see my favorite bird, Lincoln sparrow, so all in all it was it was a great day😉


Stay safe,
Kasey



--
Kasey Foley
Stockton, CA


Laughlin Park today

Kurt Mize
 

All:

I visited Laughlin Park this morning to see if the storm blew anything new in. Nothing extraordinary, but I did have two FOS Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, a male Black-throated Gray Warbler (the first I’ve seen in 6 or 7 weeks), a high count of 4 Orange-crowned Warblers, and a continuing Red-breasted Nuthatch.

Good birding,

Kurt


Yard work

Pat Croft
 

To all. I was out cleaning up my front yard this morning when a black-crowned night heron flew over. I also saw 2 western blue birds chase a starling. I believe a pair of western blue birds are nesting in the liquid amber across the street. Dave


Scaly-breasted Munia #poll

jimallan927@...
 

The Scaly Breasted Munia has been a regular visitor to my feeder, only one for the first two days and a trio every day since- two adults and a juvenile. This was also a good day for some new arrivals after the rain. A Bullocks Oriole, a Black-headed Grosbeak and a Rufous Hummingbird. We have been feeding a liter of nectar a day with 15 to 20 hummers often feeding in a swarm of activity. There is one male Anna's that appears to be a melanistic variant. He still has the metallic interference patterns, but is several shades darker, giving a black, metallic appearance.
https://ebird.org/checklist/S66728744


Re: Yard Birds 2

Judy Kane
 

Great list! 

We have had a white-throated sparrow this winter and saw it again this morning. I put seed under my lemon tree and can watch from my kitchen window. Besides the white and gold crowned there are also two fox sparrows.

Bushtits have a nest in our olive tree - we'll hold off pruning it for now!

My neighbor has a hummingbird nest in her back yard, she's not sure which one it is.

We haven't seen the kites on the levee this week but I still keep an eye out for them.

Yay for the rain!

Judy

On Fri, Apr 3, 2020 at 4:52 PM Jim Rowoth <rowoth@...> wrote:
Thanks to Kasey for prompting this.

During the current coronavirus event, like many of you, I’ve been paying more attention to my yard birds.  Past late winters/early springs have often found me galavanting around the planet, so I have missed a lot of the seasonal action in my own backyard.  Here are some of the highlights, so far this year.

Swaison’s Hawk—The first one to return was on March 21.  Two days later there were 3.  Over the 19 years I’ve been here, a pair has frequently nested in the redwood in my neighbor to the west’s front yard.  I expect the same this year.

Mourning Dove—There is currently one sitting tight on a nest in my neighbor’s mulberry tree.  There are 2 other adult birds around—papa and maybe one of last year’s offspring?

White-throated Swift—Careening high overhead and chattering for brief periods.

Anna’s Hummingbird—Greedily guarding the butterfly bush, cenanothis, and red hot pokers in my yard.  Also hawking the many gnats that seem to have taken up residence near my birdbath.

Rufous Hummingbird—Yesterday morning (Thursday), one bright cinnamon male parked himself for a couple of hours in and around the dense privets in the back.  He also hawked for gnats, but I didn’t observe him at the flowers.  Later, in the afternoon, I went out again and found an obviously a different individual (green back) on the same branch and behaving the same as he did earlier.  I don’t have a camera (or the talent) to capture the spread tail feathers, so I played back both RUHU and ALHU calls, and it perked up for RUHU but was totally uninterested in ALHU.  I haven’t found either of them today (Friday).  I hadn’t recorded a RUHU in eBird since 2009; I haven’t put up a feeder in several years.

Red-lored Parrot—I didn’t see them this morning, just before 9:00 am, but I definitely heard them flying southbound.  I assume these are probably Kasey’s birds.

Cassin’s Vireo—On Feb 22, I had a singing bird pass through my yard.  It peeked out of the dense cedar in my neighbor’s yard and gave good looks.  “Here today and gone tomorrow”—I never saw (or heard) him again.

Northern Rough-winged Swallow—One zoomed over this morning, giving its distinctive rough call.  Oddly enough, this is the only swallow I see on my eBird yard list.  (I’ll have to look up more often!)

Bushtit—There must be a pair nesting near here.  Over the years, I have had small “gangs” of them tumble through the shrubbery/trees in my yard.  Currently, I am only seeing one bird at a time.

Ruby-crowned Kinglet—I’m hearing its wonderful, lilting spring song more often these days.  It showed off its ruby crown earlier today as it foraged in another neighbor’s blossoming orange tree.

Red-breasted Nuthatch—There has been one or more nearly all winter, but rarely in my yard itself.  I have heard it softly tooting   at a distance both this morning and this afternoon.

Northern Mockingbird—Boy, the hormones are flowing!  There is a very active pair that likes my birdbath.  Lots of swooping and diving going on along with the constant singing.

Hermit Thrush—My old friend comes back every winter.  How can you not love this cheeky little fellow.  He seems to know me and swoops right by my head from time to time.  I’ve heard him softly singing to himself recently, in addition to his usual chupping.  Still here today.

Purple Finch—More frequent in late 2019, I had a singing male yesterday.

Orange-crowned Warbler—Winter resident.  I’ve learned to recognize its distinctive chip note, which makes it easler to find in my neighbor’s orange tree and the nearby privets.  It has even flashed its crown a couple of times.

Yellow-rumped Warbler—It is amazing how much more brilliant the males are now compared to just a few weeks ago.

Fox Sparrow—I haven’t seen him since January, but I enjoyed his presence much of the winter.

White-crowned and Golden-crowned Sparrows—Present annually in winter, and still around in decent numbers.  I always look for White-throated, but the last time I had one was in 2013.

I am carefully watching my hackberry and my neighbors’ pistache trees as they slowly leaf out.  I know in the past they have attracted warblers, orioles, tanagers, grosbeaks, and flycatchers (oh my!) so I expect the same this year.  Now that I am more homebound, I am getting impatient!  Bring on the show!

Wishing everyone good yard birding!

Jim Rowoth
Stockton















--
Jim Rowoth
Stockton, CA





--
M. Judith Kane
209-639-1951


Re: Laughlin Park

Kurt Mize
 

That’s great, Kasey!  I haven’t seen the Brown Creeper or Townsend’s Warbler for several weeks. I had a Pine Siskin day before yesterday, and a FOS Pac Slope Flycatcher on the 1st. I also had a singing Yellow-rumped Warbler on the 1st!  Good birding!

Kurt
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On Saturday, April 4, 2020, k foley <kaseyfoley@...> wrote:

Rich and I visited Laughlin Park this morning and saw the Brown creeper and Red-breasted nuthatch are still there. We also had good looks at a Townsend's warbler and beautiful Western bluebirds. There were a ridiculous amount (6) of Anna's hummingbirds for some reason and bushtits galore. We were unable to find the Cliff swallows, or any swallows for that matter, but did see some type of mammal in the creek, hope it was a river otter, not a NutriaEmoji


Enjoy the rain!


--
Kasey Foley
Stockton, CA


Laughlin Park

k foley
 

Rich and I visited Laughlin Park this morning and saw the Brown creeper and Red-breasted nuthatch are still there. We also had good looks at a Townsend's warbler and beautiful Western bluebirds. There were a ridiculous amount (6) of Anna's hummingbirds for some reason and bushtits galore. We were unable to find the Cliff swallows, or any swallows for that matter, but did see some type of mammal in the creek, hope it was a river otter, not a NutriaEmoji


Enjoy the rain!


--
Kasey Foley
Stockton, CA


Lodi Lake

Pat Paternostro
 

All
Today would have been our monthly walk at Lodi Lake, so I beat the rain and birded a couple hours this morning. 
The weather and cool, with grey skies, and the bird activity was moderate. 
Highlights included:  A continuing Varied Thrush, a flyover of White-faced Ibis (not normally seen on this walk), and nice views of a Sharp-shinned Hawk.  
Hopefully we are able to do our group walks again soon. 
Pat 


Heritage Oak Winery

k foley
 

Rich and I visited Heritage Oak Winery today to pick up our wine. We asked Tom (the owner) if we could walk the trail and he said yes so we went for a nice stroll in the late afternoon so birding was slow. We saw dozens of Pipevine Swallowtail, Mournful duskywing, and Western Tiger Swallowtail butterflies, along with several Alfalfa (sulfur) butterflies. Oh, right, this is a bird listserve...we saw a Chipping sparrow on our walk, which was very exciting to us, also many Bullock's orioles were chattering in the trees, House wrens everywhere, White-breasted nuthatch, Towhees (Spotted and California), Red-tailed and Swainson's hawks, tons of Western bluebirds, Audubon's warblers, Hermit thrush, Downy and Nuttall's woodpeckers, White-crowned and Golden-crowned sparrows, and a Partridge, err, uh, a California quail in the pile of branches in the lower vineyard. It's a lovely place to visit but I wanted to remind everyone that Heritage Oak is private property and a winery and we are lucky we are allowed to bird there. Please be considerate and make a purchase (order online or call first) from the tasting room so we will continue to be welcome there.

Stay Safe and Good Birding Everyone!



--
Kasey Foley
Stockton, CA


New yard bird

Susan Schneider
 

Just did a double-take, as I saw two White-tailed Kites fly very close to my house in NE Stockton.  Ran outside, and one landed on my redwood and called.  I almost managed to get a picture before it flew off. 

Take care,
Susan

--
Susan M. Schneider
Climate activist and award-winning author of The Science of Consequences
http://www.scienceofconsequences.com

“The impact of human-induced warming is worse than previously feared, and only drastic coordinated action will keep the damage short of catastrophe.”
- Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, October 2018 report (authored by 91 scientists from 40 countries, based on over 6,000 scientific references)
It's not too late.

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