Topics

Seeking advice for the KM Master's degree at Kent State

Thomas J. Froehlich
 

At Kent State University, we are in the process of strengthening our degree in Knowledge Management.  I am advising the committee to streamline and strengthen the degree and to reduce it to 36 credits, from the current 42-45: see http://www.kent.edu/slis/ms-knowledge-management-program-requirements .    We have students, even a doctoral student, in Knowledge Management, and for whatever reason, it appears that there are growing inquiries about the degree this year, while interest has been fairly flat in the past.  It still is a degree that has been hard to sell because many American companies do not really understand what it is or they have a distorted or misconstrued understanding. I have noticed that in the SIKM mailing list there have been many discussions on the nature/successes/difficulties of Knowledge Management and how to foster Knowledge Management activities and practices in organizations.   One of our concerns is determining the current framework of Knowledge Management and then strengthening our degree to match marketplace demands.  

 

Should you be interested in current educational programs in knowledge management, we would like to ask members of SIKM list to provide their views on the following three questions. 

 

(1) What are the core understandings and practices that constitute the current core of Knowledge Management – should the focal point be “Knowledge Management” or “Knowledge Services,” “Knowledge Sciences,” or some other emerging focal area in knowledge management?

 

(2) What is the current or anticipated marketplace for graduates trained in KM?  What are the skills and knowledge that are currently being sought or anticipated in job seekers?

 

(3) How can we strengthen our degree to suit current or anticipated marketplace demands?  See http://www.kent.edu/slis/ms-knowledge-management-program-requirements for required and elective courses in our current KM degree.

 

We obviously do not expect consensus on responding to these issues.  If you are interested in contributing to the discussion and make suggestions, could you please contact me (tfroehli@...) with your name and email so that I can add you to a doodle poll to determine the best time for a meeting over the next several weeks. I am assuming that most of you would be available in the evenings and the poll will be oriented toward this timeframe – if not, please let me know of daytime alternatives. If you wish to offer some advice apart from a discussion meeting, feel free to send me any advice that you care to offer (I can call you as well), and we will take it under consideration.

 

We also intend to seek next year a distinguished professor in Knowledge Management to lead our efforts in this field. We anticipate the position will be open rank to allow the possibility of hiring a thought leader from academic, corporate or government ranks.

 

We would appreciate your help with these endeavors for streamlining, strengthening and focusing our degree, by providing us with an understanding of the current status of KM and its job market.  And later we would appreciate your help for suggesting candidates for a KM position, particularly for a professor of practice.

 

We look forward to your consideration.

Matt Moore
 

Hi Thomas,

(1) What are the core understandings and practices that constitute the current core of Knowledge Management – should the focal point be “Knowledge Management” or “Knowledge Services,” “Knowledge Sciences,” or some other emerging focal area in knowledge management?

I'm not sure there is a "core" of knowledge management. There's a bunch of related areas (different kinds of content management, organisational learning and facilitation, IT systems implementation, data analysis, old-school librarianship) that kind of hang out together.

(2) What is the current or anticipated marketplace for graduates trained in KM? What are the skills and knowledge that are currently being sought or anticipated in job seekers?

The related hot areas for hiring here in Australia are 1. data science and 2. "digital" (esp. UX, design, agile development). There are still openings for people focused on content management and implementing SharePoint but that space seems to be less buzzy that it was a few years ago. Occasionally an organisational change / people-oriented role will pop up.

(3) How can we strengthen our degree to suit current or anticipated marketplace demands? See http://www.kent.edu/slis/ms-knowledge-management-program-requirements for required and elective courses in our current KM degree.
Your program requirements are pretty good. A couple comments:
- I like that you don't seem to have gone overboard with the tech but there is a strong focus on technology in the marketplace right now.
- "Design" as a theme (with a significant UX component) would also be welcome.


N.B. I teach on a Masters course here @ University of Technology Sydney. It used to be called "Knowledge Management" but someone changed it to "Digital Information Management". We are also working through the future of our course and how to deliver it effectively.

Regards,

Matt

Katepugh <katepugh@...>
 

Hello, Matt and team
It seems that in the states jobs are growing for knowledge practitioners, yet "knowledge" is not the only key word. I agree with Matt that digital, analytics, information architecture and cognitive computing are hot terms.  Collaboration of all types (networks, communities, social network analysis, collective intelligence, collaboration architecture, process improvement and change management) are equally "hot."
Check out the Columbia University Masters of Science in Information and Knowlege Strategy. Http://ce.columbia.edu/Ikns. This is designed to model the collaboration skills we impart.  (I'm the director, and a number of people in the Sikm leaders community are involved as faculty, mentors and capstone sponsors. It's in the School of Professional Studies). 

I know that, with the disruptions to education as an industry, UTS, Kent state and Columbia struggle to evolve our identity and to breathe new life into the terms "knowledge" and "information."

Kate


Katrina Pugh 
Academic Director, Columbia University Information and Knowledge Strategy
617-967-3910

On Nov 19, 2015, at 10:49 PM, Matt Moore innotecture@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Hi Thomas,

(1) What are the core understandings and practices that constitute the current core of Knowledge Management – should the focal point be “Knowledge Management” or “Knowledge Services,” “Knowledge Sciences,” or some other emerging focal area in knowledge management?

I'm not sure there is a "core" of knowledge management. There's a bunch of related areas (different kinds of content management, organisational learning and facilitation, IT systems implementation, data analysis, old-school librarianship) that kind of hang out together.

(2) What is the current or anticipated marketplace for graduates trained in KM? What are the skills and knowledge that are currently being sought or anticipated in job seekers?

The related hot areas for hiring here in Australia are 1. data science and 2. "digital" (esp. UX, design, agile development). There are still openings for people focused on content management and implementing SharePoint but that space seems to be less buzzy that it was a few years ago. Occasionally an organisational change / people-oriented role will pop up.

(3) How can we strengthen our degree to suit current or anticipated marketplace demands? See http://www.kent.edu/slis/ms-knowledge-management-program-requirements for required and elective courses in our current KM degree.
Your program requirements are pretty good. A couple comments:
- I like that you don't seem to have gone overboard with the tech but there is a strong focus on technology in the marketplace right now.
- "Design" as a theme (with a significant UX component) would also be welcome.

N.B. I teach on a Masters course here @ University of Technology Sydney. It used to be called "Knowledge Management" but someone changed it to "Digital Information Management". We are also working through the future of our course and how to deliver it effectively.

Regards,

Matt

Stan Garfield
 

Here are my replies, to add to what others have already provided.


>What are the core understandings and practices that constitute the current core of Knowledge Management ?


See KM Specialties and KM Components


>Should the focal point be “Knowledge Management” or “Knowledge Services,” “Knowledge Sciences,” or some other emerging focal area in knowledge management?


See Knowledge Management: What's in a name?


>What is the current or anticipated marketplace for graduates trained in KM?


The marketplace for KM people is fairly steady. There are always job postings - many are are shared in this community.


>What are the skills and knowledge that are currently being sought or anticipated in job seekers?


In addition to the lists of specialties and components linked to above, see 7 Habits of Highly Effective Knowledge Managers


>How can we strengthen our degree to suit current or anticipated marketplace demands?


Review the recent posts in this community for job openings. By looking at what is being requested in each job description, some useful trends can be distilled. Combine this with the lists of KM specialties and components linked to above, and that should be a good start.

paul_mcdowall
 

Hi Thomas,
I support what others have already said. Here are some additional personal observations.

(1) What are the core understandings and practices that constitute the current core of Knowledge Management – should the focal point be “Knowledge Management” or “Knowledge Services,” “Knowledge Sciences,” or some other emerging focal area in knowledge management?


Both the beauty and challenge of KM that it covers a broad waterfront.  I love the '5-blind men describing the elephant' as a useful analogy.  It can look very different in different organizations.  The difficulty comes in simply (or worse 'simplistically') trying to define it. As such the language that's used can, and I would argue 'should' be different in different organizations.  From the point of view of an academic program, I would stay with the blanket term of 'KM', and describe the sub-groupings/various application instances as different incarnations of the same basic concepts.  In the late 1990s Gartner Group said that in the future we won't call it 'Knowledge Management', we'll call it 'Management'.  This hasn't come to pass but I think it's still the most useful contextual framework for KM.  Until this is the basis for commonly accepted mental models, yielding real successes, it will stay as an misunderstood and misapplied field. IMHO this is one of your great challenges.   

 

(2) What is the current or anticipated marketplace for graduates trained in KM?  What are the skills and knowledge that are currently being sought or anticipated in job seekers?


It seems to me to still be in a legacy era of the unsuccessful KM programs of 10-20 years ago.  The many failures of KM, caused largely by numerous factors including misapplication, over-selling technology, underestimating human dynamics, etc have a long downstream effects on how it is viewed and how it is valued.  It's still a heavily technology-centric approach with strongest ties to often specialized application areas e.g. data-centric, networking-centric and documentation-centric spaces, and is isolated from it's key natural allies within organizations.  A new mindset is needed to change the success rate and the legacy if we ever hope to try to move to the kind of understanding noted by Gartner Group above.  

  

(3) How can we strengthen our degree to suit current or anticipated marketplace demands? 


Stronger links with key relationship partners is a critical component in changing the current understanding and advancing the field in dramatic ways - not an undertaking for the faint of heart nor the timid nor the toe-in-the-water types.  If you want to play a central role in truly advancing the field this is counter-cultural because fields of management are still largely kept quite separate both academically and practically, e.g.  HR management, from IT management, from project management from financial management from ...    We all know the daunting challenge to move this yardstick even the smallest amount.  IMHO this would strength any academic program and could potentially have a huge downstream effect.  

Best

Paul

Douglas Weidner
 

@Paul.
I seldom read KM posts that are as concise and inciteful as Paul's is (paul_mcdowall).

My only additional comment or clarification, regards Paul's use of the elephant metaphor - " I love the '5-blind men describing the elephant' as a useful analogy.  It can look very different in different organizations."

For those practitioners that have had extensive and DIVERSE experience, hopefully teaching same, we generally know it's an elephant (we are of course not blind). The question is: "what is the size, specific characteristics, health, longevity of an elephant, etc." Generally, you can't discern that by investigating just the leg or trunk, as Paul so rightfully says.

So, what are the biological characteristics of an elephant, certainly more than just a trunk of 'technology' or a leg of 'content management' (aka portal) or an ear of 'CoPs', etc.

What is the whole elephant? 

What are the requisite "competency areas" to make someone an elephant veterinarian?

Anyone else else teaching in an elephant veterinarian school, or practicing a more holistic field of veterinarian medicine?

Douglas Weidner, KM Institute



On Sat, Nov 21, 2015 at 4:39 PM, paul_mcdowall@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hi Thomas,

I support what others have already said. Here are some additional personal observations.

(1) What are the core understandings and practices that constitute the current core of Knowledge Management – should the focal point be “Knowledge Management” or “Knowledge Services,” “Knowledge Sciences,” or some other emerging focal area in knowledge management?


Both the beauty and challenge of KM that it covers a broad waterfront.  I love the '5-blind men describing the elephant' as a useful analogy.  It can look very different in different organizations.  The difficulty comes in simply (or worse 'simplistically') trying to define it. As such the language that's used can, and I would argue 'should' be different in different organizations.  From the point of view of an academic program, I would stay with the blanket term of 'KM', and describe the sub-groupings/various application instances as different incarnations of the same basic concepts.  In the late 1990s Gartner Group said that in the future we won't call it 'Knowledge Management', we'll call it 'Management'.  This hasn't come to pass but I think it's still the most useful contextual framework for KM.  Until this is the basis for commonly accepted mental models, yielding real successes, it will stay as an misunderstood and misapplied field. IMHO this is one of your great challenges.   

 

(2) What is the current or anticipated marketplace for graduates trained in KM?  What are the skills and knowledge that are currently being sought or anticipated in job seekers?


It seems to me to still be in a legacy era of the unsuccessful KM programs of 10-20 years ago.  The many failures of KM, caused largely by numerous factors including misapplication, over-selling technology, underestimating human dynamics, etc have a long downstream effects on how it is viewed and how it is valued.  It's still a heavily technology-centric approach with strongest ties to often specialized application areas e.g. data-centric, networking-centric and documentation-centric spaces, and is isolated from it's key natural allies within organizations.  A new mindset is needed to change the success rate and the legacy if we ever hope to try to move to the kind of understanding noted by Gartner Group above.  

  

(3) How can we strengthen our degree to suit current or anticipated marketplace demands? 


Stronger links with key relationship partners is a critical component in changing the current understanding and advancing the field in dramatic ways - not an undertaking for the faint of heart nor the timid nor the toe-in-the-water types.  If you want to play a central role in truly advancing the field this is counter-cultural because fields of management are still largely kept quite separate both academically and practically, e.g.  HR management, from IT management, from project management from financial management from ...    We all know the daunting challenge to move this yardstick even the smallest amount.  IMHO this would strength any academic program and could potentially have a huge downstream effect.  

Best

Paul


Howie Cohen
 

Team, 

          If I were to set up a program for KM as a practice a lot of the course work up front would be centered in industrial psychology and conflict management.   The next series of classes would be in advanced marketing, branding, design and business communications.  The final series of course work would be around analytics, measurement, business requirements and innovation.  The last class of the program would be a constructive and practical course on motivation.   It could be a series of Ted Talks that leads to you developing your own.   If we aren't directly creating linkages from our work to the business (which will vary based on many factors), all of the KM work amounts to the value of a "hug."   If we seek to measure everything without a story, we are wasting our time.  If we don't have the stamina to lead, fall and get the heck back up, our practice will fail.  It is a non stop daily learning and teaching activity and I invest 90% of my time on business communication.   I have stood before multiple C-level leaders to discuss KM, even if they "get it". we still have to find a way to gain traction with a whole work force.  It is all about the creation, care and management of dynamic change.   Far too often the right answers are the simple answers but most folks don't want to hear that.  ..


Best, 
Howie 

Arthur Shelley
 

Hi Folks,

 

I have been teaching a KM UNIT (one “course” or “subject” of 12, in an MBA “program” – just being specific as the language of education program differs depending in country) for 8 years and this for 2016 is being converted into a capstone course as an experiential learning activity where they do a knowledge based assignment with a real client (typically build  and cost a knowledge initiative or a knowledge strategy or created a costed proposal for a knowledge based challenge).

 

This course has been highly popular with the students and although they are quite daunted at the beginning, many have come back even years later and stated that this was the best learning experiences of their life.  The course won a national citation from the Australian Office of Learning and Teaching for “Outstanding contributions to student learning outcomes”.  The course structure and general content is covered in an open source journal here (in a special KM edition along with some other articles of people well known to this community):

http://jemi.edu.pl/all-issues/vol10/issue1/

 

This is not an entire degree or masters program- just one unit, but it does serve well as a practical capstone that applies all the learning from across the entire MBA,  bringing them into a specific challenge to be resolved. I hope you find this useful. Happy to engage in of line conversations, but VERY buried for the next couple of weeks trying to get a book finished that is already late (apologies for not sharing earlier, I will try to get to a more specific comment on Kent soon).

A

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2015: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Monday, 23 November 2015 5:35 AM
To: Sikmleaders
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Seeking advice for the KM Master's degree at Kent State

 

 

Team, 

 

          If I were to set up a program for KM as a practice a lot of the course work up front would be centered in industrial psychology and conflict management.   The next series of classes would be in advanced marketing, branding, design and business communications.  The final series of course work would be around analytics, measurement, business requirements and innovation.  The last class of the program would be a constructive and practical course on motivation.   It could be a series of Ted Talks that leads to you developing your own.   If we aren't directly creating linkages from our work to the business (which will vary based on many factors), all of the KM work amounts to the value of a "hug."   If we seek to measure everything without a story, we are wasting our time.  If we don't have the stamina to lead, fall and get the heck back up, our practice will fail.  It is a non stop daily learning and teaching activity and I invest 90% of my time on business communication.   I have stood before multiple C-level leaders to discuss KM, even if they "get it". we still have to find a way to gain traction with a whole work force.  It is all about the creation, care and management of dynamic change.   Far too often the right answers are the simple answers but most folks don't want to hear that.  ..

 

 

Best, 

Howie 

Douglas Weidner
 

@Howie,
Great advice from the field.
I attempted to categorize your points into competency areas with possibly more common academic or discipline-based names.

industrial psychology and conflict management.   (Emotional Intel)

advanced marketing, branding, design and business communications. (change mgmt.)

analytics, measurement, business requirements (Analytics-KM Metrics), 

and innovation. (Leadership/Innovation)

motivation..  (Engagement)

 

How about some specific topics/electives that are proven KM Initiative types such as Content Mgmt (Taxonomy/Search), Social Media, etc?


On Sun, Nov 22, 2015 at 1:35 PM, Howard Cohen howardscohenmba@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Team, 

          If I were to set up a program for KM as a practice a lot of the course work up front would be centered in industrial psychology and conflict management.   The next series of classes would be in advanced marketing, branding, design and business communications.  The final series of course work would be around analytics, measurement, business requirements and innovation.  The last class of the program would be a constructive and practical course on motivation.   It could be a series of Ted Talks that leads to you developing your own.   If we aren't directly creating linkages from our work to the business (which will vary based on many factors), all of the KM work amounts to the value of a "hug."   If we seek to measure everything without a story, we are wasting our time.  If we don't have the stamina to lead, fall and get the heck back up, our practice will fail.  It is a non stop daily learning and teaching activity and I invest 90% of my time on business communication.   I have stood before multiple C-level leaders to discuss KM, even if they "get it". we still have to find a way to gain traction with a whole work force.  It is all about the creation, care and management of dynamic change.   Far too often the right answers are the simple answers but most folks don't want to hear that.  ..


Best, 
Howie 


Douglas Weidner
 

@Arthur.
Excellent contribution.

On Sun, Nov 22, 2015 at 9:50 PM, 'Arthur' arthur@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hi Folks,

 

I have been teaching a KM UNIT (one “course” or “subject” of 12, in an MBA “program” – just being specific as the language of education program differs depending in country) for 8 years and this for 2016 is being converted into a capstone course as an experiential learning activity where they do a knowledge based assignment with a real client (typically build  and cost a knowledge initiative or a knowledge strategy or created a costed proposal for a knowledge based challenge).

 

This course has been highly popular with the students and although they are quite daunted at the beginning, many have come back even years later and stated that this was the best learning experiences of their life.  The course won a national citation from the Australian Office of Learning and Teaching for “Outstanding contributions to student learning outcomes”.  The course structure and general content is covered in an open source journal here (in a special KM edition along with some other articles of people well known to this community):

http://jemi.edu.pl/all-issues/vol10/issue1/

 

This is not an entire degree or masters program- just one unit, but it does serve well as a practical capstone that applies all the learning from across the entire MBA,  bringing them into a specific challenge to be resolved. I hope you find this useful. Happy to engage in of line conversations, but VERY buried for the next couple of weeks trying to get a book finished that is already late (apologies for not sharing earlier, I will try to get to a more specific comment on Kent soon).

A

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2015: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Monday, 23 November 2015 5:35 AM
To: Sikmleaders <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Seeking advice for the KM Master's degree at Kent State

 

 

Team, 

 

          If I were to set up a program for KM as a practice a lot of the course work up front would be centered in industrial psychology and conflict management.   The next series of classes would be in advanced marketing, branding, design and business communications.  The final series of course work would be around analytics, measurement, business requirements and innovation.  The last class of the program would be a constructive and practical course on motivation.   It could be a series of Ted Talks that leads to you developing your own.   If we aren't directly creating linkages from our work to the business (which will vary based on many factors), all of the KM work amounts to the value of a "hug."   If we seek to measure everything without a story, we are wasting our time.  If we don't have the stamina to lead, fall and get the heck back up, our practice will fail.  It is a non stop daily learning and teaching activity and I invest 90% of my time on business communication.   I have stood before multiple C-level leaders to discuss KM, even if they "get it". we still have to find a way to gain traction with a whole work force.  It is all about the creation, care and management of dynamic change.   Far too often the right answers are the simple answers but most folks don't want to hear that.  ..

 

 

Best, 

Howie 


Murray Jennex
 

Arthur/all,
 
I've been doing a similar course.  Mine is a 3 unit course but it is on Decision Support Systems.  KM is a third of the class but I use it at the very beginning to introduce the concepts of knowledge and then at the end when I show how integrate dss into KM systems and go over topics related to KM strategy, KM systems, KM success and measurement, KM technologies (which include all the previous dss technologies), and applying KM to solve business problems.  Students do a capability mapping on themselves and we discuss how to integrate all the maps into an organizational capabilities map and ultimately topic maps.  We also discuss how to integrate dss exercises into KM systems.  I also get very positive feedback on the course.  I believe that along with Arthur's course the idea of doing real application appeals to students and solving real problems makes a strong impression on them.....murray jennex
 

In a message dated 11/22/2015 6:50:47 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, sikmleaders@... writes:


Hi Folks,

 

I have been teaching a KM UNIT (one “course” or “subject” of 12, in an MBA “program” – just being specific as the language of education program differs depending in country) for 8 years and this for 2016 is being converted into a capstone course as an experiential learning activity where they do a knowledge based assignment with a real client (typically build  and cost a knowledge initiative or a knowledge strategy or created a costed proposal for a knowledge based challenge).

 

This course has been highly popular with the students and although they are quite daunted at the beginning, many have come back even years later and stated that this was the best learning experiences of their life.  The course won a national citation from the Australian Office of Learning and Teaching for “Outstanding contributions to student learning outcomes”.  The course structure and general content is covered in an open source journal here (in a special KM edition along with some other articles of people well known to this community):

http://jemi.edu.pl/all-issues/vol10/issue1/

 

This is not an entire degree or masters program- just one unit, but it does serve well as a practical capstone that applies all the learning from across the entire MBA,  bringing them into a specific challenge to be resolved. I hope you find this useful. Happy to engage in of line conversations, but VERY buried for the next couple of weeks trying to get a book finished that is already late (apologies for not sharing earlier, I will try to get to a more specific comment on Kent soon).

A

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2015: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Monday, 23 November 2015 5:35 AM
To: Sikmleaders
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Seeking advice for the KM Master's degree at Kent State

 

 

Team, 

 

          If I were to set up a program for KM as a practice a lot of the course work up front would be centered in industrial psychology and conflict management.   The next series of classes would be in advanced marketing, branding, design and business communications.  The final series of course work would be around analytics, measurement, business requirements and innovation.  The last class of the program would be a constructive and practical course on motivation.   It could be a series of Ted Talks that leads to you developing your own.   If we aren't directly creating linkages from our work to the business (which will vary based on many factors), all of the KM work amounts to the value of a "hug."   If we seek to measure everything without a story, we are wasting our time.  If we don't have the stamina to lead, fall and get the heck back up, our practice will fail.  It is a non stop daily learning and teaching activity and I invest 90% of my time on business communication.   I have stood before multiple C-level leaders to discuss KM, even if they "get it". we still have to find a way to gain traction with a whole work force.  It is all about the creation, care and management of dynamic change.   Far too often the right answers are the simple answers but most folks don't want to hear that.  ..

 

 

Best, 

Howie 

Arthur Shelley
 

Thanks Murray and Douglas,

 

I agree that the students always get more out of any course that integrates a degree of practical application of the theories and I am writing about this in my new book.

They look at a real challenge differently from a theoretical case.  The social learning aspects of genuine applied groupwork experience is also a significant part of being “work ready”.

This is a key aspect of the new course being evolved from the current one and something that all courses could benefit from if the student numbers are manageable (I have between 30 and 50).

The course is 36 hours of contact time- sometimes as an intensive and sometimes 3 hours by 12 weeks.  Students are “expected” (advised) to invest another 9 hours per week (3 as preparation before the class, to be ready to discuss topics rather than have them “presented”, 3 afterwards as review and 3 hours on assessment activities). Those that do this get great ROI. Those that want to be “taught” in the traditional way, get behind and don’t do so well.  However, I stick to the plan and make it VERY clear they are there to learn and that takes effort.  You can’t get fit by sitting on couch watching TV- Learning is the same- get up and participate actively or fail (or take less challenging courses - which is what some choose to do by the end of week 1 J - which is better for everyone!).

 

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Monday, 23 November 2015 5:26 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Seeking advice for the KM Master's degree at Kent State

 

 

Arthur/all,

 

I've been doing a similar course.  Mine is a 3 unit course but it is on Decision Support Systems.  KM is a third of the class but I use it at the very beginning to introduce the concepts of knowledge and then at the end when I show how integrate dss into KM systems and go over topics related to KM strategy, KM systems, KM success and measurement, KM technologies (which include all the previous dss technologies), and applying KM to solve business problems.  Students do a capability mapping on themselves and we discuss how to integrate all the maps into an organizational capabilities map and ultimately topic maps.  We also discuss how to integrate dss exercises into KM systems.  I also get very positive feedback on the course.  I believe that along with Arthur's course the idea of doing real application appeals to students and solving real problems makes a strong impression on them.....murray jennex

 

In a message dated 11/22/2015 6:50:47 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, sikmleaders@... writes:




Hi Folks,

 

I have been teaching a KM UNIT (one “course” or “subject” of 12, in an MBA “program” – just being specific as the language of education program differs depending in country) for 8 years and this for 2016 is being converted into a capstone course as an experiential learning activity where they do a knowledge based assignment with a real client (typically build  and cost a knowledge initiative or a knowledge strategy or created a costed proposal for a knowledge based challenge).

 

This course has been highly popular with the students and although they are quite daunted at the beginning, many have come back even years later and stated that this was the best learning experiences of their life.  The course won a national citation from the Australian Office of Learning and Teaching for “Outstanding contributions to student learning outcomes”.  The course structure and general content is covered in an open source journal here (in a special KM edition along with some other articles of people well known to this community):

http://jemi.edu.pl/all-issues/vol10/issue1/

 

This is not an entire degree or masters program- just one unit, but it does serve well as a practical capstone that applies all the learning from across the entire MBA,  bringing them into a specific challenge to be resolved. I hope you find this useful. Happy to engage in of line conversations, but VERY buried for the next couple of weeks trying to get a book finished that is already late (apologies for not sharing earlier, I will try to get to a more specific comment on Kent soon).

A

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2015: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Monday, 23 November 2015 5:35 AM
To: Sikmleaders
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Seeking advice for the KM Master's degree at Kent State

 

 

Team, 

 

          If I were to set up a program for KM as a practice a lot of the course work up front would be centered in industrial psychology and conflict management.   The next series of classes would be in advanced marketing, branding, design and business communications.  The final series of course work would be around analytics, measurement, business requirements and innovation.  The last class of the program would be a constructive and practical course on motivation.   It could be a series of Ted Talks that leads to you developing your own.   If we aren't directly creating linkages from our work to the business (which will vary based on many factors), all of the KM work amounts to the value of a "hug."   If we seek to measure everything without a story, we are wasting our time.  If we don't have the stamina to lead, fall and get the heck back up, our practice will fail.  It is a non stop daily learning and teaching activity and I invest 90% of my time on business communication.   I have stood before multiple C-level leaders to discuss KM, even if they "get it". we still have to find a way to gain traction with a whole work force.  It is all about the creation, care and management of dynamic change.   Far too often the right answers are the simple answers but most folks don't want to hear that.  ..

 

 

Best, 

Howie 

Alice MacGillivray
 

Arthur Shelley wrote about a KM program with an: "experiential learning activity where they do a knowledge based assignment with a real client."

In the MA in KM I used to direct, we used this approach as well, and it was equally impactful.  It wasn't a capstone (that was a thesis) but was integrated into other course work.  I'm doing some research on that kind of design at present and if I can expand it in the future--Arthur--I will be in touch.

Alice MacGillivray, PhD

Arthur Shelley
 

Hi Alice,

 

It would be nice to touch base again after a long time.

Looking forward to a discussion soon.

 

Good weekend to all.

A

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2015: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Friday, 27 November 2015 2:08 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Re: Seeking advice for the KM Master's degree at Kent State

 

 

Arthur Shelley wrote about a KM program with an: "experiential learning activity where they do a knowledge based assignment with a real client."

In the MA in KM I used to direct, we used this approach as well, and it was equally impactful.  It wasn't a capstone (that was a thesis) but was integrated into other course work.  I'm doing some research on that kind of design at present and if I can expand it in the future--Arthur--I will be in touch.

Alice MacGillivray, PhD