Second Red-naped Sapsucker in Botanical Garden


Bob Toleno
 

Aaron Maizlish found a Red-naped Sapsucker in the Botanical Garden today at around 11:30am that appears to be a different individual than the male that Alan Hopkins found in the Fragrance Garden. This bird appears to be an adult female, though it lacks the white chin that most female RNSA show. (I'm not 100% sure of the sex, though, and would be happy to be corrected.) He spotted this bird in a tree with extensive sap wells on the border between the nectar garden and the redwood grove, approximately here: 37.767046, -122.472229

Aaron's bird has a number of characters that are different than the Fragrance Garden bird, including a thinner white supercilium, a small vertical row of white spots to the left of the parallel rows of whitish bars on the back, and a narrower red throat patch. Our (poor) photos and write-ups can be found in our eBird reports:


Good birding,
Bob Toleno
Hayward


Bob Toleno
 

Correction: the bird was on the border of the Succulent Garden and Redwood Grove, not the "nectar garden" as i said.

On Tue, Nov 16, 2021 at 4:14 PM Bob Toleno via groups.io <bob=toleno.com@groups.io> wrote:
Aaron Maizlish found a Red-naped Sapsucker in the Botanical Garden today at around 11:30am that appears to be a different individual than the male that Alan Hopkins found in the Fragrance Garden. This bird appears to be an adult female, though it lacks the white chin that most female RNSA show. (I'm not 100% sure of the sex, though, and would be happy to be corrected.) He spotted this bird in a tree with extensive sap wells on the border between the nectar garden and the redwood grove, approximately here: 37.767046, -122.472229

Aaron's bird has a number of characters that are different than the Fragrance Garden bird, including a thinner white supercilium, a small vertical row of white spots to the left of the parallel rows of whitish bars on the back, and a narrower red throat patch. Our (poor) photos and write-ups can be found in our eBird reports:


Good birding,
Bob Toleno
Hayward


Nina Bai
 

Hi folks,

I believe this is the same bird that was at the Log Cabin trail (where the Virginia’s Warbler was) last month. First seen on 10/19. I went back the next morning for additional photos and videos:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S96491471

https://photos.app.goo.gl/ypPrTF6tfQEraamW8

The pattern on the back and secondaries seem to match up as well as the amount of red on the back of the head.

I think there’s a good argument for this being a Red-naped, though others more knowledgeable than I have suggested hybrid with Red-breasted. Curious what others think!

 

Nina 

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Nina Bai
San Francisco


Bob Toleno
 

I agree with you, Nina: the plumage on your bird from last month on the Log Cabin trail matches perfectly with the one we saw yesterday, so it has to be the same individual. Good eye! I would be very curious to hear from the more knowledgeable people who identified this bird as Red-breasted X Red-naped hybrid. I'm definitely not an expert on this genus, and i'm happy to learn more, but nothing that Aaron or i saw while we were in the field, and nothing that i can see from either Nina's photos or ours obviously identifies this bird as a hybrid. The red was entirely restricted to the crown, throat patch, and nape. I assumed that a Red-breasted hybrid would always show at least a few red feathers elsewhere on the face or breast. Is that assumption incorrect? Are there other field marks that point toward hybrid that i'm missing?

Thanks in advance,
Bob Toleno
Hayward


On Tue, Nov 16, 2021 at 7:25 PM Nina Bai <aninanina@...> wrote:
Hi folks,

I believe this is the same bird that was at the Log Cabin trail (where the Virginia’s Warbler was) last month. First seen on 10/19. I went back the next morning for additional photos and videos:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S96491471

https://photos.app.goo.gl/ypPrTF6tfQEraamW8

The pattern on the back and secondaries seem to match up as well as the amount of red on the back of the head.

I think there’s a good argument for this being a Red-naped, though others more knowledgeable than I have suggested hybrid with Red-breasted. Curious what others think!

 

Nina 

--
Nina Bai
San Francisco