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Parakeet Auklet and Black Oystercatchers

Rudyard Wallen
 


Hey Folks,

The PAAU flew out to the deep channel at about 10:40am, just to add that to its behavior record.

On a real bummer of a note the Black Oystercatchers that were flushed from their single egg by some instagrammers climbing Hermit Rock have abandoned the nest.  I don’t have the number with me (I only just learned this) but you can report climbers on the sea stacks, especially during nesting season, to the GGNRA.  It’s considered off designated trails, as well let them know nesting birds are being disturbed. 

You can also report a seabird disturbance here- 


Cheers

-Rudy W. 
SF 

Rudyard Wallen
 

Sorry, meant to add the PAAU flew out due west (keep in mind the coastline there runs NE/ SW.) 

R

Gerry McChesney
 

I don't know when those folks climbed up Hermit Rock (steep climb!), but there was a mobile, probably week to 10-day old oystercatcher chick on Hermit Rock on June 26.  If its survived to this point (oystercatcher generally have low breeding success), it would be getting pretty big and capable of skirting off somewhere and hiding, which they're very good at.  I'd still keep an eye out for it (and the adults, of course).  

Gerry McChesney
Fremont, CA


On Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 11:43 AM Rudyard Wallen <arelist12@...> wrote:

Hey Folks,

The PAAU flew out to the deep channel at about 10:40am, just to add that to its behavior record.

On a real bummer of a note the Black Oystercatchers that were flushed from their single egg by some instagrammers climbing Hermit Rock have abandoned the nest.  I don’t have the number with me (I only just learned this) but you can report climbers on the sea stacks, especially during nesting season, to the GGNRA.  It’s considered off designated trails, as well let them know nesting birds are being disturbed. 

You can also report a seabird disturbance here- 


Cheers

-Rudy W. 
SF 

Rudyard Wallen
 

Hi Gerry, 

that's awesome news. In previous years they incubated 2-3 eggs, though they only ever successfully fledged one chick. 

The climb up that crevice is not difficult (these guys were amateurs) but they got up high enough and far enough into the cave, where the PIGU nest, to flush everything out the back of the cave and into the water behind Hermit Rock.  This proximity caused the birds at the top of the rock to startle, including the BLOY so I have a photo of one egg unattended with a Western Gull about a meter away (cue dark music).  Between your description and the timing it sounds like they only had the one egg

The only time I've reported climbers on cliffs or sea stacks is when they are disturbing roosting or nesting birds. Call this number, though if it's a difficult location (such as Hermit rock) they ask that you remain on site. Dispatch will probably let you know if it's required
 
NPS San Francisco Field Office *Non-Emergency line: (415) 561-5505 

It's the same number to report drones operated within the GGNRA

And again seabird disturbances by people or boats can be reported here 

Thanks again Gerry- if they get this one down from the rock to where it's foraging on its own that will be 4 fledged chicks over 6 years, though with 2014 being a first attempt that failed early. Young parents? If you managed to get photos of the chick  can you send one or two off list?

Rudy W.
SF

Any questions on this please contact me off list.

*I have no idea in what instances you would call their emergency line over 911 but NPS SF Emergency: (415) 561-5656




Joel Perlstein
 

Did the oystercatchers temporarily, or permanently, abandon the nest.

Are there any signs at the base of hermit rock telling people not to climb it.


--
Joel Perlstein
San Francisco