Mt D Hammond's & Others


Brian Fitch
 

After finding Mt Davidson again appearing to be devoid of migrants, I refused to accept that as a possibility on an April 29th with slight easterly breezes, and waited and watched and waited some more, until a few migratory species finally worked their way through.  Most birds seemed to be quickly driven off by the ferocity of the local hummingbirds, with one Sharp-shinned Hawk being mobbed by a minimum of 15 hummers, even though it was at least 100 feet above the summit and only cruising through.

The only unusual bird was a Hammond's Flycatcher that flew into the ravine, perched for three seconds, and then flew into the forest.  A single Pac-slope called invisibly, as did a Warbling Vireo with two rounds of song, and a possible MacGillivray's which gave just a few distant chip notes.  In the visible category were a few Orange-crowned and Townsend's Warblers, a female Lazuli that was chased by a House Finch, a female Black-headed Grosbeak that was chased by some Anna's, and a late staying Fox Sparrow hiding in the elderberry.  The oddest event was one male each of grosbeak and bunting flying in together from the north, and then wandering unchased around the top of the ravine for half an hour.
Brian Fitch