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KATZ INTRODUCES QUAIL MEASURE

Alan Hopkins <ash@...>
 

I thought I'd pass this on to ya' all.

Alan


NEWS FROM THE OFFICE OF SUPERVISOR KATZ

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 22, 2000
Contact: Janet Michaelson (415)554-5335;
Mark Westlund (415) 934-4814, Dept of Environment


SUPERVISOR KATZ INTRODUCES MEASURE
TO PROTECT REMAINING QUAIL IN SAN FRANCISCO

RESOLUTION WILL HELP RESTORE NATURAL QUAIL HABITAT
IN CITY PARKS, AND NAME CALIFORNIA QUAIL OFFICIAL CITY BIRD


The dwindling population of California quail in San Francisco may be one
step
closer to recovery if the City gets behind an effort to restore quail
habitat in
parks and open spaces, and names the quail San Francisco's official City
Bird.
Supervisor Leslie Katz will introduce such a resolution at the Board of
Supervisors Meeting on Monday, June 26, based on a similar resolution
adopted by
the Commission on the Environment on May 15.

There are currently only twelve California quail left in Golden Gate
Park, down
from a citywide population of more than 1,500 in the early 1900s. A
small
number of quail can also be found at Fort Funston and in the Presidio.
These
indigenous birds will die out unless measures are taken to restore
suitable
conditions, such as planting shrubs the quail need for nesting and not
letting
ivy run rampant in City parks.

"The quail is a native resident of San Francisco, and we'd be a lesser
City if
we let local coveys slide into extinction," said Supervisor Katz.
"We're not
talking about spending a lot of City money. The key to saving the quail
is
making a few small changes in the way we maintain our parks and open
spaces."

The resolution will also call for the quail, already the official state
bird of
California, to become the official bird of San Francisco. While the
City Seal
features an image of the mythological Phoenix bird � along with a miner,
a
sailor, and a steamship entering the Golden Gate � San Francisco has yet
to
adopt an official avian representative.

"If we adopt the quail as our own, we will have a greater stake in
making sure
they survive," said Supervisor Katz. "Who wants to tell future
generations that
there used to be quail here, we could have done something to save them,
but we
didn't meet the
challenge."

The resolution was drafted in consultation with community groups that
include
the Golden Gate Audubon Society and SPCA. It calls for City agencies to
support
the Audubon Society's "Save the Quail" campaign and restore
quail-friendly
habitat by controlling invasive non-native plants, while at the same
time
keeping City parks safe for urban wildlife.

"Our parks are big enough to meet all needs, human as well as animal,"
said
Supervisor Katz. "There's room for recreation, there's room for wild
and
domestic animals, there's room for habitat restoration and we must make
room for
the quail."

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