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Baby Lawrence's Goldfinch

Aaron Maizlish
 

Folks,

I got down to the Presidio around 5pm this evening.  With David Tomb, we were able to pretty quickly get on what appears to be a recently fledged Lawrence’s Goldfinch.  (Someone please correct me if I’m wrong!). Note the white in the tail, the yellow already coming in on the wing, the pale head and large bill - all of which I think safely separate this from the other finches.  We stayed with this bird for about ten minutes and then it flew off with another (possibly juvenile, possibly adult female.). This was at the coordinates that Lee Hong-Chang gave in the first post.  Over the next hour I was unable to get on any other LAGOs - though I heard the tinkle call a few times.  It was difficult with the high winds and the literally hundred plus House Finch, Lesser Goldfinch, juncos, song and WC sparrows, and Hooded Orioles flying around.  This area seems to be a breeding frenzy.   You should also check the trees in a little gully about 100 yards north of the spot (not accessible by any main trail) where I last heard the LAGO call.

Are there any other breeding records of this bird in San Francisco in modern times?

Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco







Sam _
 

Exciting! Last year when sorting through some historical observations I found this 1915 record of a nest "6 ft up in an alder bush near the water" by Dudley DeGroot from an unspecified location in the county: https://collections.wfvz.org/record-display.php?search_type=2&fAction=search&specimen_type=0&cat_num=94053

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I asked Josiah about it and I believe he said that they also nested in the Presidio one year about a decade ago. I'm sure he or others would have more information on that--I mostly just wanted to share the old photos from WFVZ.

Wish I were still around to see them now!

Best,
Sam Safran
Minneapolis


On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 9:42 PM Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:
Folks,

I got down to the Presidio around 5pm this evening.  With David Tomb, we were able to pretty quickly get on what appears to be a recently fledged Lawrence’s Goldfinch.  (Someone please correct me if I’m wrong!). Note the white in the tail, the yellow already coming in on the wing, the pale head and large bill - all of which I think safely separate this from the other finches.  We stayed with this bird for about ten minutes and then it flew off with another (possibly juvenile, possibly adult female.). This was at the coordinates that Lee Hong-Chang gave in the first post.  Over the next hour I was unable to get on any other LAGOs - though I heard the tinkle call a few times.  It was difficult with the high winds and the literally hundred plus House Finch, Lesser Goldfinch, juncos, song and WC sparrows, and Hooded Orioles flying around.  This area seems to be a breeding frenzy.   You should also check the trees in a little gully about 100 yards north of the spot (not accessible by any main trail) where I last heard the LAGO call.

Are there any other breeding records of this bird in San Francisco in modern times?

Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco







Joe Morlan
 

On Thu, 25 Jun 2020 19:42:29 -0700, "Aaron Maizlish"
<amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

Are there any other breeding records of this bird in San Francisco in modern times?
There were four juveniles at Quail Commons in the Presidio July-August
2006.

https://flic.kr/s/aHsiDge2wN

As far as I know, no adults were seen there and I speculated that the
juveniles may have been displaced by a fire in Del Puerto Canyon that year.
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA

Bob Hall
 

I’m interested in hearing what they Lawerence’s are using for habitat. It it the same set of exotic plants that have been there for years? Is it the result of some restoration work? Can anyone Identify the type of plants that they’re using for cover and forage?

These kind of details can help with advocacy with city agencies.

Thanks,

Bob Hall

--
Bob Hall
San Francisco, CA
"There is no better high than discovery." - E.O. Wilson

Daniel Scali
 

Hiya,

To answer Bob's question, I noticed today that the area where the LAGOs have been most frequently seen is full of fiddlenecks, plants that I had heard LAGOs like. This morning I watched the stunning adult male visit multiple plant patches, chomping away on his favored parts.

Dan