Date   
India Basin

Alan Hopkins
 

 Today I led a trip to India Basin for GGAS. Some of the highlights were:

Hunters Point Shipyard:
Merlin
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Bewick's Wren
Spotted Towhee

Heron's Head Park:
Ridgeway's Rail
Marsh Wren

Large flocks of Brown Pelicans and Double-crested Cormorants 






Alan S. Hopkins
San Francisco, CA

American White Pelican

David Assmann
 

A short visit to Fort Mason this morning was highlighted by an AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN flying east in front of Alcatraz. The Community Garden had a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW and a LINCOLN'S SPARROW. I also had a brief look at a greenish warbler in the Battery with prominent white wingbars, but lost it in with all the YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS before being able to ID it.

Summer Tanager and Chipping Sparrow

David Assmann
 

Both the SUMMER TANAGER and the CHIPPING SPARROW continue at Lafayette Park this afternoon.

Crissy Field Ross Goose

Scott Bowers
 

Seen in the Crissy Field Lagoon parking lot, and later flying toward the lagoon.  Also American Pipit in the field.

- Scott

Ferry Park - Palm and Black-Throated Grey Warblers, White-Throated Sparrow 11-13-2018

Jack Hayden
 

Today, around 1pm I had views of a couple each Palm Warbler, Black-Throated Grey Warbler and White-Throated Sparrow at Ferry / Sue Bierman Park. The park was very active with lots of yellow-rumps chupping and flitting about, as well as a good helping of White-crowned Sparrows. While not seen at the same time, I concluded there were two Palm Warblers present when one showed distinct small streaks on the breast compared to the other with more indistinct smudgy streaks.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49919365

Jack Hayden,
Albany, CA

Odd Stuff (like Chopi Blkbrd?)

Brian Fitch
 

I visited several sites this morning, starting with a walk in the grass at Crissey, which actually left me with dry feet.  Stirred up four Savannahs, and six Am. Pipits, but the odd highlight was a bird briefly with the starling flock.  It was mostly black with a brown tinge, except for a panel in the secondaries of lighter brown feathers, and the eyes were black.  It was about the size of the starlings, but it's posture was more upright than local blackbirds.  It seemed more like a cowbird in shape, except that the beak, though broad based, curved down and out to a fine point.  It then took flight, and headed to the lagoon, but eventually swerved back over me and landed rather distantly, where it was briefly joined by a smaller brown bird that looked like a female/juv cowbird.  Then both birds flew toward and over me with the female bird showing a forked tail, as well as some stripes on the body.  Later the male returned alone and flew all over Crissey without ever landing again within my view; I lost it well off toward the Coast Guard Pier.

Many years ago, Keith Hansen in Marin reported a Chopi Blackbird in his area.  I looked the species up, and the following day recognized the same bird when it appeared at S Lake Merced with the icterid flock there.  After checking photos today of Shiny Cowbird and seeing the wrong beak, I once again reviewed Chopi, and it looks fine for what I saw this morning, though I did not try to review the entire blackbird family.  Keep your eyes peeled for it around Crissey, even though it's a likely escapee. 

The only other unusuals were an Acorn Woodpecker flying by the East Wash, and a Turkey Vulture perched at Middle Lake, one of the few I've ever seen sitting around the city.  I suspect that both were smoke or east wind affected, and wonder what other oddities are out there.

Brian Fitch

Fort Mason Local Interest

David Assmann
 

Lots of activity, but not much unexpected.  4 KILLDEER on the Great Meadow, which is fairly unusual, a WHITE-THROATED SWIFT flew over, and a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW was in the garden.  There are two continuing HOUSE WRENS - one in the garden and one above Aquatic Park.

Continuing Summer Tanager; Common birds in uncommon locations

Richard Bradus
 

Hi all

Probably spent too much time outdoors today given the smoke, but there were some interesting moments.

On a quick walk-through of Alta Plaza Park I spotted three Meadowlarks, not on the lawns but rather perched atop the evergreens near the northeast corner. What they were doing way up there I have no idea.

Spent the noon hour and a bit more at Lafayette Park, joined for much of the time by Cliff Yap. I was able to re-locate the female Summer Tanager, now perching in and flycatching from the eucs on the east side across from the condo building. There were also some interesting mixed groups of sparrows; at one point a White-throated, White-crowned and Fox sparrow were all foraging together. A Ruby-crowned Kinglet somewhat incongruously explored a cavity in a tree, perhaps foraging for spiders. And there was also an Oriole, probably a female (or immature) Hooded, though its extensive full yellow coloration and small, straight beak raise the possibility that it may have been an Orchard Oriole - too bad it quickly went into hiding and we were unable to get photos. Complete list and my photos at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49925696

This fall continues to yield surprises - let's hope the weather favors the firefighters and there are no more disasters.

Richard Bradus
San Francisco

535 American Crows at Rincon Center Nov. 13, 5:20 pm, gone at 7:15

William Grant
 

Greetings,

I reported at ebird: Roosting in trees, on roof, counted by 2s; passed by the same area around 7:10 pm and the crows were gone. Evidently they arrive there, communicate loudly with other crows, then go elsewhere for the night, perhaps on roofs where they can be warmed by air from the air-handling systems.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49922109

I plan to return some late afternoon and watch them arrive, then depart.

If this part of SF is their preferred area to overnight, counting them there could give an estimate of the SF crow population. Does anyone know other places they spend the night?

I often see 50 crows on Pacific Ave. between Van Ness and Franklin arrive around 8:00 am, then depart for the day's activities. Sometimes I also see them flying by on their way east in the morning.

Bill

Release Doves at Lake Merced Wooden bridge parking lot

Lee Rudin
 


4 Doves  (white pigeons) seen in lot and on way to wooden bridge. Can't fly well and getting mobbed by crows. Surprised they haven't been picked off yet. Left message with SF Animal Care. Perhaps someone knows a source to call? 

Lee Rudin 

Sent from my Sprint Phone.

Re: 535 American Crows at Rincon Center Nov. 13, 5:20 pm, gone at 7:15

Siobhan Ruck
 

I often see good sized flocks during my drive home along Sagamore Street (connector between Alemany and Brotherhood). Often 50+ birds, sometimes more than 100. The flocks sometimes turn up on the eastern end of Brotherhood as well.

I was thinking it was a winter thing, but realized that’s the only time of year that it’s getting dark as I drive that stretch. So possible year round roost site.

Siobhan Ruck SF

On Nov 14, 2018, at 7:14 AM, William Grant <wbgrant@...> wrote:

Greetings,

I reported at ebird: Roosting in trees, on roof, counted by 2s; passed by the same area around 7:10 pm and the crows were gone. Evidently they arrive there, communicate loudly with other crows, then go elsewhere for the night, perhaps on roofs where they can be warmed by air from the air-handling systems.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49922109

I plan to return some late afternoon and watch them arrive, then depart.

If this part of SF is their preferred area to overnight, counting them there could give an estimate of the SF crow population. Does anyone know other places they spend the night?

I often see 50 crows on Pacific Ave. between Van Ness and Franklin arrive around 8:00 am, then depart for the day's activities. Sometimes I also see them flying by on their way east in the morning.

Bill


Re: Release Doves at Lake Merced Wooden bridge parking lot

Chris Okon
 

yes, palomacy.org deals w dove and pigeon rescue

On Wed, Nov 14, 2018 at 12:53 PM Lee Rudin <leewaysf@...> wrote:

4 Doves  (white pigeons) seen in lot and on way to wooden bridge. Can't fly well and getting mobbed by crows. Surprised they haven't been picked off yet. Left message with SF Animal Care. Perhaps someone knows a source to call? 

Lee Rudin 

Sent from my Sprint Phone.

--

Christine Okon
630 Mangels Ave.
San Francisco, CA 94127
415-860-5102

Shipyard Burrowing Owl as seen from Yosemite Slough Restoration.

bitanangan
 

Hi Birders,
      Bulldozers were bullying a Burrowing Owl on the shipyard landfill today as seen from the garden at Yosemite Slough. The owl was near the large yellow barrel-looking vent (?) and repetitively flying off a very short distance when a bulldozer came too near.  Couldn’t relocate the Palm Warbler just photographed here by Oscar Moss or the White-throated Sparrow seen by David Tomb and myself last week. One American Pipit flushed from the mudflat to dive somewhere near the garden pond. At least 70 Semi-palmated Sandpipers, 75 Meadowlarks and 150 Least Sandpipers—all ebird filter-busting tallies for the location. 6 Black Turnstones.
      Also saw a large all-white solitary pigeon fly towards La Raza Park across Caesar Chavez at 101 this morning.
Russ Bright
SF

Errata In previous message.

bitanangan
 

Hi Birders,
    Saw Semi-palmated Plovers, definitely not Semi-palmated Sandpipers!
Russ Bright
SF

Palm Warbler at Lake Merced

David Assmann
 

At least one PALM WARBLER continued this morning west of the boathouse at Lake Merced.

Thursday presentation and west side barn owls

Josiah Clark
 

As I am putting the finishing touches on a presentation for Golden Gate Audubon tomorrow night, I keep hearing a barn out the window. I have been observing them often of late, with one night up to three individuals around the 17th ave palm trees. I also saw one along Park Presidio going through the park diving down on a rat last night. Tonight just one along with the local pair of great horned owls. A decade ago this species was considerably rarer in the city. Very cool that these days they are breeding in the city. I suspect many of the ones around my neighborhood are migrants.

The presentation is called Habitat Potential Birding Tactics. I am including a little bit of everything including birding adventure photos and videos, strategies to maximize Christmas Bird and Big Day Counts and some local bird natural history videos and knowledge.
Doors at 6:30, presentation 7 PM first Unitarian church 1187 Franklin St.

Re: Thursday presentation and west side barn owls

kim
 

Thankx for the sighting info. I have never seen a Barn Owl, where on 17th? Thinking of palms, Lake st? What time if evening are you seeing them?

Thank you
Kim in SF

On November 14, 2018, at 11:39 PM, Josiah Clark <josiah.clark621@...> wrote:

As I am putting the finishing touches on a presentation for Golden Gate Audubon tomorrow night, I keep hearing a barn out the window. I have been observing them often of late, with one night up to three individuals around the 17th ave palm trees. I also saw one along Park Presidio going through the park diving down on a rat last night. Tonight just one along with the local pair of great horned owls. A decade ago this species was considerably rarer in the city. Very cool that these days they are breeding in the city. I suspect many of the ones around my neighborhood are migrants.

The presentation is called Habitat Potential Birding Tactics. I am including a little bit of everything including birding adventure photos and videos, strategies to maximize Christmas Bird and Big Day Counts and some local bird natural history videos and knowledge.
Doors at 6:30, presentation 7 PM first Unitarian church 1187 Franklin St.

barn owls

ben
 

I hear a barn owl scream most nights roughly 1 hour past dark in the
lower haight around pierce / page

Thankx for the sighting info. I have never seen a Barn Owl, where on
17th? Thinking of palms, Lake st? What time if evening are you
seeing them?

Ross's Goose, Greater White-Fronted Goose, Cackling Goose and Hooded Oriole

David Assmann
 

Four species of geese at Crissy Field this morning. A GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was on the lawn with nine CACKLING GOOSE.  CANADA GEESE were in the Lagoon, and a ROSS'S GOOSE was near the bridge along with many BROWN PELICANS (there were at least 400 in the Lagoon). A HOODED ORIOLE and a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW were in the Community Garden at Fort Mason.

Air pollution map for SF

William Grant
 

Just found this URL showing PM2.5 pollution (particles less than 2.5 microns), the most dangerous particulate matter since they are most likely to lodge in the lungs.

https://www.purpleair.com/map#12/37.76002/-122.4149

Birders who do venture out in these conditions may want to wear masks.

Bill