Date   
Returning Black-throated Green Warbler at Stow Lake today.

bitanangan
 

Hi Birders,
     Thanks Brian for initially refinding this bird, found again today by Lee Guichan on Strawberry Hill and later by Reef (apologies, don’t know your last name) in an oak along the Log Cabin Trail, and later still by David Tomb when it flew to a familiar haunt in a clump of trees along Stow Lake where I was finally able to catch up with it.
    But how can this be the same bird seen a few months ago last spring, then found in the exact same place sporting a rather solid black throat while this individual today, in a quick live glance at a very hyper-active bird or even of a photo, have an apparent grey throat yet still briefly flashing, from a certain angle an almost subtly iridescent faintly there, then not, black throat?
     If Jon Dunn and Kimball Garrett can be believed on page 306 of their Peterson Field Guide to Warblers in a statement is made regarding molt in fall males: “...black on the throat and breast is heavily veiled with white tips...” which explains why a bird with an apparent grey throat might really have a black throat! I don’t readily know these things, just sharing some quick, basic follow-up research this evening that some of you might find interesting.
     The continuing Blackburnian Warbler and a White-throated Sparrow were also seen along the Log Cabin Trail.
Russ Bright
SF

Black-throated Green Warbler at Stow Lake.

bitanangan
 

Hi Birders,
     As a correction, Lee has kindly reminded me that she did not see the BTGW on Strawberry Hill yesterday, but rather found it along Stow Lake Drive. Sorry about that!
      We don’t often get to see the same individual rarity in spring and fall, making this well-photographed bird so interesting. Searching Ebird’s illustrated checklist might be useful to anyone interested in making comparisons, studying a potential hybrid or molt.
Russ Bright
SF

Re: Black-throated Green Warbler at Stow Lake.

Joe Morlan
 

The singing male last April was outside of the expected vagrant window for
this species. Spring records are usually much later from late May to early
June. It is possible that it may have spent the winter undetected until it
started singing. This species winters occasionally in Southern California,
sometimes with the same individual returning in successive years. It will
be interesting to see if this bird sticks around this winter. Please keep
the reports coming!

On Wed, 24 Oct 2018 09:52:07 -0700, "bitanangan" <birdbright@...>
wrote:

Hi Birders,
     As a correction, Lee has kindly reminded me that she did not see the BTGW on Strawberry Hill yesterday, but rather found it along Stow Lake Drive. Sorry about that!
      We don’t often get to see the same individual rarity in spring and fall, making this well-photographed bird so interesting. Searching Ebird’s illustrated checklist might be useful to anyone interested in making comparisons, studying a potential hybrid or molt.
Russ Bright
SF
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA

Black-throated Green Help Requested

Mark Stephenson
 

Greetings all,
I’m bringing a couple of birders over this afternoon to look for the Black-throated Green Warbler seen yesterday at Stow Lake. Any information about it’s whereabouts would be greatly appreciated.
Happy Birding,
Mark & Lucas Stephenson 



Re: Black-throated Green Help Requested

Aaron Maizlish
 

Mark,

Just in case no one else responds in time.

I haven’t been over to see the Black-throated Green Warbler this week, but Lee Guichan described exactly the same trees that this bird was at in April this year when it was in breeding plumage:   

37°46'10.8"N 122°28'22.1"W


I saw it in the Pittisporum(?) on the north side of the road and the willow-like tree on the south/lake side of the road.   Also from her description birders were looking for it on the Log Cabin Trail which is down the slope (North) of this spot.  Note that it was first spotted on the island both in April and this month, probably because the island is birded more frequently than these trees, which is probably where it mostly hangs out.

Good luck to you and Lucas.

Aaron




On Oct 24, 2018, at 10:29 AM, Mark Stephenson via Groups.Io <markstephenson4106@...> wrote:

Greetings all,
I’m bringing a couple of birders over this afternoon to look for the Black-throated Green Warbler seen yesterday at Stow Lake. Any information about it’s whereabouts would be greatly appreciated.
Happy Birding,
Mark & Lucas Stephenson 




Re: Black-throated Green Help Requested

C Lou
 

Th bird is currently being seen with 5 townsends warbler. Just pass duck feeding station.

Calvin Lou
SF



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Aaron Maizlish <aaron.maizlish@...>
Date: 10/24/18 1:03 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: markstephenson4106@...
Cc: SF Birds <SFBirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SFBirds] Black-throated Green Help Requested

Mark,

Just in case no one else responds in time.

I haven’t been over to see the Black-throated Green Warbler this week, but Lee Guichan described exactly the same trees that this bird was at in April this year when it was in breeding plumage:   

37°46'10.8"N 122°28'22.1"W


I saw it in the Pittisporum(?) on the north side of the road and the willow-like tree on the south/lake side of the road.   Also from her description birders were looking for it on the Log Cabin Trail which is down the slope (North) of this spot.  Note that it was first spotted on the island both in April and this month, probably because the island is birded more frequently than these trees, which is probably where it mostly hangs out.

Good luck to you and Lucas.

Aaron




On Oct 24, 2018, at 10:29 AM, Mark Stephenson via Groups.Io <markstephenson4106@...> wrote:

Greetings all,
I’m bringing a couple of birders over this afternoon to look for the Black-throated Green Warbler seen yesterday at Stow Lake. Any information about it’s whereabouts would be greatly appreciated.
Happy Birding,
Mark & Lucas Stephenson 




Re: Black-throated Green Help Requested

Mark Stephenson
 

Can you give coordinates?
Mark Stephenson 




On Wednesday, October 24, 2018, 1:50 PM, cdlou37 <cdlou37@...> wrote:

Th bird is currently being seen with 5 townsends warbler. Just pass duck feeding station.

Calvin Lou
SF



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Aaron Maizlish <aaron.maizlish@...>
Date: 10/24/18 1:03 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: markstephenson4106@...
Cc: SF Birds <SFBirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SFBirds] Black-throated Green Help Requested

Mark,

Just in case no one else responds in time.

I haven’t been over to see the Black-throated Green Warbler this week, but Lee Guichan described exactly the same trees that this bird was at in April this year when it was in breeding plumage:   

37°46'10.8"N 122°28'22.1"W


I saw it in the Pittisporum(?) on the north side of the road and the willow-like tree on the south/lake side of the road.   Also from her description birders were looking for it on the Log Cabin Trail which is down the slope (North) of this spot.  Note that it was first spotted on the island both in April and this month, probably because the island is birded more frequently than these trees, which is probably where it mostly hangs out.

Good luck to you and Lucas.

Aaron




On Oct 24, 2018, at 10:29 AM, Mark Stephenson via Groups.Io <markstephenson4106@...> wrote:

Greetings all,
I’m bringing a couple of birders over this afternoon to look for the Black-throated Green Warbler seen yesterday at Stow Lake. Any information about it’s whereabouts would be greatly appreciated.
Happy Birding,
Mark & Lucas Stephenson 




Black-throated Green Warbler today, Stow Lake Drive East, G.G.P

Lee Guichan
 

Hello everyone,
Black-throated Green Warbler showed up again this morning in the Pittosporsum large shrub or tree (has wavy leaf edges with something that look like  clumped berries)  this morning at about 11:30am - 12pm. I was with a couple of Townsends's Warblers. It stayed in the Pittosposum until we lost it, the shrub is nest to a lower shrub with large leaves& small white flowers.

Location is the same as I posted yesterday. G.G. P, Stow Lake East, It was past Stow Lake Roman Bridge, South side just past the Great Heron Colony island, Pittosporsum is on the North side of the street.
(Yesterday about 2:25 in was seen in the Willow that has hanging branches above sidewalk.)

Ken M. spotted it, Nancy P., & I were also scanning trees next to him. We were joined by Dan & Joan Murphy, & Angie, great views of the Black-throated Green Warbler.  
Thank you Brian Tuner who found the Black-throated Green Warbler on Mon. 22nd at Strawberry Hill. 

About 12:30pm a small flock of birds flew into the Pittosporsum among the flock was the
Blackburnian Warbler (found by Angie Geiger over one week ago) which has been seen mostly in the large Oak tree along the Log Cabin trail near east side of the large lawn.


Good luck!

Lee Guichan
San Francisco

Re: Black-throated Green Help Requested

Peter Pyle
 

The photos I've seen posted on eBird so far are relatively consistent with an adult male, matching the bird from last year. The primary coverts look blackish and not contrasting much with the greater coverts, there seems to be some moderate black centers to the back feathers, and the white tips to the greater coverts lack black shaft streaks. The only thing counter to adult male might be the throat pattern - I would expect more blackish in a definitive basic male - but this could be variable in the (generally) poorly known basic plumages of most Setophaga. I'll keep monitoring photos as they come into eBird to see if I can confirm age/sex - hopefully some better ones can be posted.

Peter

At 01:03 PM 10/24/2018, Aaron Maizlish wrote:
Mark,

Just in case no one else responds in time.

I haven’t been over to see the Black-throated Green Warbler this week, but Lee Guichan described exactly the same trees that this bird was at in April this year when it was in breeding plumage:

37°46'10.8"N 122°28'22.1"W


I saw it in the Pittisporum(?) on the north side of the road and the willow-like tree on the south/lake side of the road. Also from her description birders were looking for it on the Log Cabin Trail which is down the slope (North) of this spot. Note that it was first spotted on the island both in April and this month, probably because the island is birded more frequently than these trees, which is probably where it mostly hangs out.

Good luck to you and Lucas.

Aaron




On Oct 24, 2018, at 10:29 AM, Mark Stephenson via Groups.Io <<mailto:markstephenson4106=yahoo.com@groups.io>markstephenson4106=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Greetings all,
I’m bringing a couple of birders over this afternoon to look for the Black-throated Green Warbler seen yesterday at Stow Lake. Any information about it’s whereabouts would be greatly appreciated.
Happy Birding,
Mark & Lucas Stephenson

Palm Warbler, Alta Plaza

Richard Bradus
 

Hi all,

Not a birdwatching day for me, but I got lucky. Heading briskly through Alta Plaza Park en route to other things I noted a flurry of Yellow-rumped activity approaching the cluster of evergreens near the northeast corner of the park. Stopping to investigate (without binoculars, alas), I soon caught sight of a distinctly different bird - a yellowish rump, to be sure, but also yellow under tail (more yellow than the rump) and a strong eye line and prominent pale supercilium. When it gleaned it pumped its tail almost continuously - ah ha! Hello Palmie! Tried to get a photo with my ancient iPhone; that was a laugh (did get one, with the bird encompassing perhaps a dozen pixels? - ess. worthless). Initially hanging with a nice male Townsend's, it soon poked around on its own, and I lost it as it flew into thick foliage and off somewhere - right after one of the local ravens, which had been quietly perched above, croaked loudly. 

Parenthetically, the last Palm Warbler I remember seeing in SF was also in Alta Plaza Park, actually a pair, in October 2014. Don't know why they seem to be drawn to this otherwise unrewarding birding location but ...  

Just a reminder that it's always a good idea to look about no matter where you might be headed, as nature's wonders fill even our everyday working world.

Here's to more unexpected discoveries!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco

Black-Throated Green Warbler Log Cabin Trail

Mark Stephenson
 

Just found the Black-throated green warbler at Log cabin with A Blackburnian and townsends flock in two oaks on log cabin trail. 



Chestnut-sided warbler, Eastern GGP

Bob Hall
 

At 4:15pm, I heard a loud thwack note and expected to see a yellow warbler. But instead, I saw a first-year chestnut-sided warbler. 

Walk through the Stanyan entrance, follow the path past the oak moth-filed oak trees. Cross the street that leads to Arguello, not sure of the name. It used to be the entrance the dell but the sign is gone. When you cross the road you will see a bright yellow, biodiversity-useless ginkgo tree. The bird was in a mixed flock behind that tree in what appears to be a London Plane/Sycamore type tree. 

Just follow the thwack note.
--
Bob Hall
San Francisco, CA
"There is no better high than discovery." - E.O. Wilson

Re: Palm Warbler, Alta Plaza

C Lou
 

Richard's PALM WARBLER continues in the northeast corner of Alta Plaza Park in SF. In the 4 conifers along the path at the corner of Jackson and Steiner.

Calvin Lou
SF



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "Richard Bradus via Groups.Io" <grizzledjay@...>
Date: 10/24/18 3:50 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: SF Birds <sfbirds@groups.io>
Cc: SFBirds@groups.io
Subject: [SFBirds] Palm Warbler, Alta Plaza

Hi all,

Not a birdwatching day for me, but I got lucky. Heading briskly through Alta Plaza Park en route to other things I noted a flurry of Yellow-rumped activity approaching the cluster of evergreens near the northeast corner of the park. Stopping to investigate (without binoculars, alas), I soon caught sight of a distinctly different bird - a yellowish rump, to be sure, but also yellow under tail (more yellow than the rump) and a strong eye line and prominent pale supercilium. When it gleaned it pumped its tail almost continuously - ah ha! Hello Palmie! Tried to get a photo with my ancient iPhone; that was a laugh (did get one, with the bird encompassing perhaps a dozen pixels? - ess. worthless). Initially hanging with a nice male Townsend's, it soon poked around on its own, and I lost it as it flew into thick foliage and off somewhere - right after one of the local ravens, which had been quietly perched above, croaked loudly. 

Parenthetically, the last Palm Warbler I remember seeing in SF was also in Alta Plaza Park, actually a pair, in October 2014. Don't know why they seem to be drawn to this otherwise unrewarding birding location but ...  

Just a reminder that it's always a good idea to look about no matter where you might be headed, as nature's wonders fill even our everyday working world.

Here's to more unexpected discoveries!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco

Re: Palm Warbler, Alta Plaza

Elliotte Rusty Harold
 

Palm warbler is now 11:25 am feeding on the sloping lawn downhill and East of the tennis courts.


On Thu, Oct 25, 2018, 09:56 C Lou <cdlou37@...> wrote:
Richard's PALM WARBLER continues in the northeast corner of Alta Plaza Park in SF. In the 4 conifers along the path at the corner of Jackson and Steiner.

Calvin Lou
SF



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "Richard Bradus via Groups.Io" <grizzledjay=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Date: 10/24/18 3:50 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: SF Birds <sfbirds@groups.io>
Subject: [SFBirds] Palm Warbler, Alta Plaza

Hi all,

Not a birdwatching day for me, but I got lucky. Heading briskly through Alta Plaza Park en route to other things I noted a flurry of Yellow-rumped activity approaching the cluster of evergreens near the northeast corner of the park. Stopping to investigate (without binoculars, alas), I soon caught sight of a distinctly different bird - a yellowish rump, to be sure, but also yellow under tail (more yellow than the rump) and a strong eye line and prominent pale supercilium. When it gleaned it pumped its tail almost continuously - ah ha! Hello Palmie! Tried to get a photo with my ancient iPhone; that was a laugh (did get one, with the bird encompassing perhaps a dozen pixels? - ess. worthless). Initially hanging with a nice male Townsend's, it soon poked around on its own, and I lost it as it flew into thick foliage and off somewhere - right after one of the local ravens, which had been quietly perched above, croaked loudly. 

Parenthetically, the last Palm Warbler I remember seeing in SF was also in Alta Plaza Park, actually a pair, in October 2014. Don't know why they seem to be drawn to this otherwise unrewarding birding location but ...  

Just a reminder that it's always a good idea to look about no matter where you might be headed, as nature's wonders fill even our everyday working world.

Here's to more unexpected discoveries!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco

Black-throated Green Warbler and Blackburnian Warbler - Log Cabin Trail

Linda Swanson
 

Both the Black-throated Green Warbler and Blackburnian Warbler were seen in the large oak on the Log Cabin Trail in Golden Gate Park this afternoon about 4:30 pm.

Linda Swanson

Black-throated Green at Dusk (10/25/18)

 

... and with the sun setting at 18:20, the BLACK-THROATED GREEN Warbler was back along Stow Lake Drive moving through the same trees it was observed in this spring at (Lat. 37.7695 Long. -122.4742)

What a gift to have it return.

Dominik Mosur
San Francisco 


On Oct 25, 2018, at 17:33, Linda Swanson <lswanson@...> wrote:

Both the Black-throated Green Warbler and Blackburnian Warbler were seen in the large oak on the Log Cabin Trail in Golden Gate Park this afternoon about 4:30 pm.

Linda Swanson

Crissy Field Local Interest

David Assmann
 

There were two CACKLING GEESE on Crissy Field this morning - at opposite ends of the field at first, and then in with CANADA GEESE. One GREATER-WHITE FRONTED GOOSE was in with the flock as well. A WHITE-THROATED SPARROW was on the path on the west end of the lagoon. There were about 15 WESTERN MEADOWLARKS mixed in on the field as well.

Unusual (avian) behavior inside the Palace of Fine Arts

Richard Bradus
 

Hi all

On a visit to the Palace of Fine Arts this afternoon I witnessed two birds doing unusual things INSIDE the cupola (dome) of the main palace building. First was a hummingbird that repeatedly skimmed all along the underside of the dome, just off the undersurface, working back and forth in a prolonged, methodical process. I assumed at first that it was gathering spider web silk, but it did this repeatedly over a period of at least ten minutes (longer than my neck would tolerate looking way up!), so I wonder if it was maybe sweeping up tiny flying insects. Or ... ?

Also hanging out inside the dome was, of all things, a Says Phoebe that repeatedly hawked for insects, flying back to perch/hide in the crevices in the sculptural artwork adorning the cupola. It ignored the hummingbird but aggressively chased off the couple of Yellow-rumped Warblers that also ventured under the dome to try to forage.

Has anyone seen similar behavior, from either species? Any thoughts?


Also, the Palm Warbler was still working the northeast corner of Alta Plaza Park when I walked by later this afternoon (Oct. 25, ~4pm). What a treat to have multiple rare/unusual warbler visitors (Palm, Blackburnian, Chestnut-sided, BthGrn) in The City at the same time!

Have fun and enjoy our wonderful fall weather!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco

Selasphorus

David Assmann
 

A Selasphorus Hummingbird was in the row of red flowering eucalyptus trees that starts behind the park police station at Fort Scott yesterday morning.  That whole row of trees had a lot of activity.  Also, forgot to mention that when I walked from the parking lot at Crissy Field to the lagoon, I heard a bird making loud chatter noises south of the path just before the bridge.  It sounded slightly like a wren.  I never saw the bird.

Alta Plaza Palm Warbler continues

Rob Cullison
 

Spotted in cypresses in northeast corner of park by Cliff a bit after 10 this morning, 10/26.

Happy birding,
Rob Cullison