Date   
Re: Ruff

C Lou
 

Ruff is still being seen by the terns. 200pm

Calvin Lou
SF



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Adam Winer <awiner@...>
Date: 8/26/19 12:25 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: Aaron Maizlish <aaron.maizlish@...>
Cc: SF Birds <sfbirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SFBirds] Ruff

Any subsequent reports - positive or negative - would be highly appreciated, before I decide to have a go at it later this afternoon.

On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 10:07 AM Aaron Maizlish <aaron.maizlish@...> wrote:
There is a juvenile Ruff at Crissy Lagoon. On the sandbar with about 600 Elegant Terns. Logan says this is the second city record.

Aaron Maizlish



Re: Ruff

Adam Winer
 

Any subsequent reports - positive or negative - would be highly appreciated, before I decide to have a go at it later this afternoon.


On Mon, Aug 26, 2019 at 10:07 AM Aaron Maizlish <aaron.maizlish@...> wrote:
There is a juvenile Ruff at Crissy Lagoon. On the sandbar with about 600 Elegant Terns. Logan says this is the second city record.

Aaron Maizlish



Black-and-white Warbler McLaren Park

Kevin Liberg
 

A Black-and-white Warbler was at McLaren Park this morning.  Seen from the wooden boardwalk above the lower pond.  Maybe the same bird seen last week by Dan Scali.
Complete list:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59280433

Kevin Liberg
San Francisco

Ruff

Aaron Maizlish
 

There is a juvenile Ruff at Crissy Lagoon. On the sandbar with about 600 Elegant Terns. Logan says this is the second city record.

Aaron Maizlish

Crissy Field Lagoon

Felix Rigau
 

Around mid-day I walked over to Crissy Lagoon to check out the flock of ELEGANT TERNS . Concurring with my last count there were upwards of 500 birds presenting a dramatic visual and audio spectacle. The ongoing parade of walkers, joggers and tourists on bicycles also seemed to be enjoying this avian spectacle as they paused to look and gander (bird pun intended) at the dense flock on the sand bar near the foot bridge. A pair of juvenile FORSTER’S TERNS as well as an adult and juvenile CASPIAN TERN were also observed mixed in with the flock. A RED-NECKED PHALAROPE and a SPOTTED SANDPIPER were also seen foraging along the margins of the lagoon. A beautiful day for birds and people alike!

Felix Rigau

Oak Woodlands and Lily Pond

Loretta
 

Hi all,

After a peaceful but unproductive hour or two in the oak woodlands this morning (junkos and chickadees galore, but no migrants), I headed back to the car via the Lily pond.

Before I got to there, two birds winged over from the Aids Memorial Grove. And I was treated to excellent looks at a Cassin's Vireo, then a Warbling Vireo. The Cassin's disappeared, but the Warbling lingered longer than I did. #wherewasmycamera #imanidiot

This was in the low trees right on the road, just north of the Lily pond path.

Good migration!

Lorētta

Marine Layer at Strawberry Hill/Stow Lake

Ken Moy
 

Sunday, 8/25, 7:15 -10:15am: Marine layer was lower and denser than earlier this week but I don't think it reduced number of birds. I was joined for part of the time by Judi and Pat from the East Bay.

Stow Lake: greeted with a chorus of yellow warblers in the eucalypti just west of the eastern steps but I could only see about a dozen birds that were shaped and flying like them with no color coming through the fog, a yellowish warbling vireo was in the bush overhanging the walkway on Stow Lake Drive East (30-40 yards east of the concrete bridge where it was seen the day before @ 7:30)

Strawberry Hill: 1 wilson's warbler in landscaped area near the pavilion, 3 orange crowned warblers, 2 townsend's warblers in the trees and bushes upslope from the landscaped area, 4 visually identifiable yellow warblers, 2 different townsend's warblers in the pine with the old man's beard (thanks Pat) and 1 different orange crowned warbler in a pine sited at lake level and viewable at eye level from the reservoir near the picnic table.

Log Cabin Trail: on a quick jaunt out of the park, had a flyover female western tanager east of Mother's Meadow.

Good birding to all,

Ken Moy

Seawatch + Ocean Beach shorebirds, 8/25/19

Paul Saraceni
 

Early this morning I checked the shorebird roost in the mid-dunes on Ocean Beach between Noriega and Moraga.  In addition to 650+ Sanderlings, there were a few small groups of Western Sandpipers (11 total, mostly juvs.) and Semipalmated Plovers (4), in addition to 43 Snowy Plovers in the vicinity, as well as a calling, fly-over Killdeer.  2 Long-billed Curlews briefly landed on the beach then picked-up and flew N calling loudly.  3 Elegant and 1 Caspian Terns were loafing near the gull flock (Western, Heermann's, California) at that time.


I then headed to the south-end of the Great Highway for a seawatch (8:45-10:30 AM), joined by Hugh Cotter and Rob Cullison for portions of the watch.  The fog bank moved in and out, with visibility ranging from half-way to nearly out to the horizon.  Winds were light from the S and seas were flat.


Sooty Shearwaters were missing from this morning's watch, but there was nice variety overall. 


Observations of local interest:


NORTHERN PINTAIL 13 (1 flock flying N over the ocean)

Surf Scoter 45+ (on the ocean)

BLACK SCOTER 1 m. & 1 f. (with the Surf Scoter flock; very early date; presumably summered locally, though I have not observed them with the summering scoter flock until this morning) 

W. Grebe 3

Com. Loon 4 (on the ocean; basic plumage)

Red-thr. Loon 1 (flying S)

Pelagic Cormorant 3

Brown Pelican 80+ 

Semipalmated Plover 3 (flying S over the beach)

Whimbrel 5

DOWITCHER sp. 11 (1 flock flying S over the ocean)

Red-necked Phalarope 3 (singles flying over the ocean)

W. Sandpiper 2 (flying S over the beach w/Semi. Plovers)

Elegant Tern 30+ (flying S)

Parasitic Jaeger 5 (2 & 3)

POMARINE JAEGER 2 sub-ads. (singles)

Pigeon Guillemot 2 juvs.

Com. Murre 1

Barn Swallow 2


Also:

Bottlenose Dolphin 2

Harbor Porpoise 1


Paul Saraceni

San Francisco

HMB pelagic report - Another Awesome Day!

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Hey all,

   A quick report of our San Mateo county pelagic trip today, as I need to rest up before Bodega tomorrow. Fun! Was the word of the day, birds all day, and some good ones. A different Laysan Albatross from the one we saw last week was a nice surprise. We found storm petrel flocks! Not quite a thousand birds, but close. Ashy, Black and Fork-tailed. We found several Scripps’s Murrelets. Four species of shearwater, including Buller’s and a Short-tailed spotted by Steve Howell. Lots of Arctic Terns, and all three jaegers as well as numerous Sabine’s gulls. As has been the norm, Marbled Murrelet on the way out. Red Phalaropes have arrived, and two different Tufted Puffins were a bonus. Such a great day out, but then you add in the mammals and it was a stunner. Killer Whales! About ten miles offshore from Half Moon Bay, as well as lots and close views of Humpback Whales, Pacific White-sided Dolphin, several views of Steller’s Sea Lions. Then there were two shark species, a couple of Blue Shark, and a larger and fat dark brown shark that we are currently identifying as Salmon Shark.

   There was so much out there that I am surely missing something.

SF BIRDERS – The San Francisco pelagic is next week. It is HOT out there, and I am sure that in the Pioneer Canyon we can find some storm petrels, and hopefully some murrelets. It is during the height of the tern, jaeger, Sabine’s migration and given the luck we have had with Laysan, maybe it is just a great year for them out there. Come and check it out! You can book online here:

http://alvarosadventures.com/boat-trips/pelagics/

good birding

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 


Virus-free. www.avg.com

GGAS Field Trip: McLaren Park

Daniel Scali
 

Hi birders!

27 fabulous birding enthusiasts joined me this morning to take a crack at McLaren during this post-breeding/early Fall migration period. We began with 2 resident raptor species (Red  -Tail and -Shoulder) sitting calmly in some trees and soon found ourselves enmeshed in a flurry of year round residents and there dispersing counterparts — tons of Cal Towhees and Dark-eyed Juncos with some White-crowned Sparrows and American Robins in the mix. Migrant highlights were a Yellow Warbler, Warbling Vireo, Pacific-slope Flycatcher, and a bunch of Hooded Orioles and a Western Tanager (the latter 2 species were seen by 8 of us who did an addendum walk down to Vis Valley Middle School). A female Northern Harrier was the other very exciting bird seen during the bonus walk, gliding low on top of a nearby ridge. The bird that stole the show overall was a Great-Horned Owl we flushed from its perch in some conifers above the willow/elderberry creek just above the Jerry Garcia Amphitheatre. With great team work most if not all of us were able to refind our camouflaged carnivore friend and get decent looks to boot.

Enjoy,
Dan Scali

2 Mornings @ Strawberry Hill/Stow Lake

Ken Moy
 

Overcast skies with mist/fog rising and falling hilltop to lake dominated Strawberry Hill and Stow Lake for 2 mornings and produced the following:

Friday, 8/23, 7:30 - 10:30 - over 6 yellow warblers (2 bright males) across the trail from the pavilion, 2 hermit warblers and at least 1 townsend's warbler above the reservoir, at least 1 wilson's warbler downslope from picnic table, 2 western tanagers (female) and 1 male black headed grosbeak in the shrubbery around and upslope from the picnic table and 2 western/pac slope flycatchers near the top of the waterfall. Best of all, a succession of 5 birders shared in many of the sightings.

Saturday, 8/24, 7:15 -11:15 - 3 yellow warblers (2 bright males sighted early and one bright make with rusty/grayish streaks on breast spotted later) in small leafed bushes on Stow Lake Drive East between the eastern steps and the concrete bridge, 2 warbling vireos in the large bush overhanging the walking path just east of the concrete bridge, 2 orange crowned warblers (1 in the small leafed bushes on Stow Lake Drive and one in the eucalyptus upslope from the landscaped area near the pavillion), 2 townsend's warbler and 1 western/pac slope flycatcher in the same eucs as the orange crowned and also in the adjacent pines, and 1 wilson's warbler downslope from the picnic table.

Good birding,

Ken Moy

Fort Mason Local Interest, White Pelicans continue at Crissy

David Assmann
 

A relatively short visit to Fort Mason this morning yielded two BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAKS, four YELLOW WARBLERS and a BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER in the Battery, and a HOUSE WREN in the garden.  The two AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS continue in Crissy Lagoon. Two FORSTER'S TERNS stood out among about 500 ELEGANT TERNS.

West End of City Local Interest

David Assmann
 

A PARASITIC JAEGER was chasing ELEGANT TERNS offshore at the Cliff House this morning, while Sutro Heights Park had a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH. The East Wash was pretty active, with a WILLOW FLYCATCHER, 2 WILSON'S WARBLERS, an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER, a SWAINSON'S THRUSH, a LAZULI BUNTING, 2 PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHERS, a BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK and an Empid with a completely round eye ring. Strawberry Hill had 5 YELLOW WARBLERS, 3 PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHERS and a TOWNSEND'S WARBLER.

Seawatch -- Sooty Shearwaters et al., 8/23/19

Paul Saraceni
 

This morning (7:20-9:00 AM) I did a seawatch from the south end of the Great Highway.  The morning began with a fog bank several hundred yards offshore, but that mostly cleared by the time I departed.  Winds were brisk S-SW and increasing, with choppy seas.


The highlight this morning was the continued presence of SOOTY SHEARWATERS off of Ocean Beach -- they were in view the entire time I was there. When I arrived there were ~400+ on the water and swirling around nearshore of the fog bank.  Soon after a "river" of Sooties appeared from the N and hundreds were passing per minute heading S. This continued for about 20 minutes.  Then about 10 minutes later they seemingly turned around and were heading N, with some large sub-groups setting down on the water. My rough estimate was 30-40,000, but who knows. 


Other observations of local interest:


Surf Scoter 45 (on the ocean)

Brown Pelican 100+ (many in the frenzy with the Sooty Shearwaters)

Black Oystercatcher 1 (flying S over the surf)

Whimbrel 4

Sanderling 4

Red-necked Phalarope 11 (moving S in small #s)

Elegant Tern 150+ (most flying S)

Caspian Tern 3

POMARINE JAEGER 1 sub-ad. (lumbering S within 100 yards of shore)

Barn Swallow 2


Paul Saraceni

San Francisco

Red-necked Phalaropes, Thu 8/22

Adam Winer
 

At Pine Lake Park this morning, the only real surprise was a single Red-necked Phalarope at the eastern end of the lake;  it flew around the lake, landing a couple of times, before finally taking off and flying to the east.  There are at least a few other records from this park.  There was also a smattering of the most expected migrants.

With that, I wasn't surprised to see several groups of Red-necked Phalaropes, totaling about 40 in all, north of the concrete bridge at south Lake Merced.  In a very brief visit, there were also small numbers of the most common migrants as well as a single Cliff Swallow.

-- Adam Winer


Fort Mason and Crissy Field Local Interest

David Assmann
 

Best birds this morning at Fort Mason were in the dense fog right after sunrise - almost all sightings were in the Battery today - WESTERN KINGBIRD, LAZULI BUNTING, 2 WESTERN TANAGERS, 6 YELLOW WARBLERS, ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER, RED-BEASTED NUTHATCH, PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER, and WILLOW FLYCATCHER.  Turns out yesterday's sighting of a group of five swallows turned out to be Barn, not Cliff, Swallows. At Crissy Field, the two AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS and the RED-NECKED PHALAROPE continued this morning.

Some interesting activity at Presidio Hills

Richard Bradus
 

Hi all

Taking advantage of this continuing nice August weather, I spent the late morning wandering about the Presidio Hills. Bird activity was a bit hit-or-miss, but a number of interesting smaller birds popped up in the central scrub. I finally got to see a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher here, along with a few migrant flycatchers (Western, Willow) and what I presume was an immature male Yellowthroat whose extensive yellow underparts and hint of yellow spectacles had me thinking ever so briefly that it could have been an Oporornis (Kentucky) Warbler.

Most exciting was the interplay between a number of resident and fly-over hawks, including a juv. Coop harassing, chasing and seemingly attacking a Red-shouldered, eventually driving it down into the trees to the north. I included a few photos of the action on my eBird report: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59186787

It may be August but the weather and early migrant activity sure make it seem like September. Have some fun out there!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco

Strawberry Hill Migrants

Ken Moy
 

Hi all,

At 8:30-45am on 8/22, a trio consisting of a bright male yellow warbler and clean male townsend's warbler and black throated gray warbler emerged from the fog into a small pine at the SW corner of the top of the hill where the trail connecting to the reservoir  passes a large tree stump under a cypress. The townsend's made several forays into and out of the cypress, the black throated gray flew into the growth near the stump and the yellow flew north. Joined by ChrisV around 9:15 and he could not refind birds. Saw AlanH at the bottom of the falls around 10:30 and reported my sightings. He sallied forth with hope, bins and clearing skies.

Happy birding to all,

Ken Moy

RROS and Alvaro's Adventures Bodega Trip on Sunday - spots open. Calm weather!

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Hello all,

    We have had some cancellations and now have open spots for the Bodega Trip on Sunday. This is run jointly by the Redwood Region Ornithological Society (https://www.rros.org/) and myself. You can sign up on our website:

http://alvarosadventures.com/boat-trips/pelagics/ or contact Gene Hunn (enhunn323@...). Either way will work.

   **** Weather and water looking interesting ****  Bodega is not known for calm wind, but Sunday is predicted to be a low wind day. This prediction has held since early in the week. As well, off the Bodega Buoy there has been some warm water with low chlorophyll, that is a different habitat, clearer bluer water. Perhaps the Albacore are out there, they certainly are a bit farther north in California. Point of all of this is that we will be looking hard for offshore murrelets on this day with these conditions, given that a Guadalupe showed up in BC, they must be out there! Half Moon Bay last weekend had the first Black Storm-Petrels of the season this far north, and in these conditions finding a storm petrel flock is much easier than with choppy conditions so we will be looking. Overall, seabird diversity kicked up a notch last weekend so we are looking forward to what we see this weekend!

Good birding,

Alvaro and Gene.    

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 


Virus-free. www.avg.com

Strawberry Hill Migrants and a lucky squirrel

Ken Moy
 

Good morning!

Quick update. on Tuesday (8/20) from 8:30am to 11:30am (joined by NancyP around 9:30) and sighted at least 3 yellow warblers (one a bight male), 2 wilson's warblers, 4 townsend's warblers (2 males, 1 HY male and 1 juvenile) and 2 western flycatchers (one fairly yellow/buff individual). Came back around 3pm to find a male western tanager. Also, sighting of a local hutton's virea

On Wednesday morning, spotted 2 yellow warblers, 2-3 wilson's warblers and 1 hermit warbler.

During my Tuesday afternoon outing, I noticed a large bird flying into a pine sited downslope from the SW corner of the hill, about 15 feet away and in the shadows. I looked with my bins and immediately saw a red tail hawk in a supine position with its tail towards the trunk of the tree, flapping wings extended below its body and screeching. Almost immediately, the head, front legs and torso of a squirrel appeared from behind the trunk and facing the hawk. The squirrel started clawing and hissing at the hawk with a vengeance. The hawk was not using its beak or talons and appeared to be under duress. I subsequently surmised that the hawk had pounced on the tail/lower body of the squirrel, failed to subdue it and was trying to extricate its talons. The hawk succeeded after a second or two and flew off. The squirrel scampered down the tree. I could not see whether it was injured.