Date   

bay ducks 1/15/20

 

An estimated 3,000 diving ducks (primarily Greater Scaup) and other assorted waterfowl/Grebes are in several big rafts at the county line between San Francisco and San Mateo.

This is an annual mid winter occurrence but definitely worth taking in before these flocks move off or disperse as well as an opportunity to find less common diving ducks in the mix.

Good vantage points for San Francisco birders are from Candlestick State Recreation Area main parking lot, candlestick point and Last Port. A bit tougher for San Mateo, with no publicly accessible sites I'm aware of besides walking along the shoreline at low tide from Candlestick SRA "Last Port" unit.
Most of the birds are however technically south of the county line in San Mateo hence the post to both lists.

Scope absolutely essential to observe/count/sort through all but the closest rafts.

Dominik Mosur
San Francisco


Black Skimmer

Dan Harris
 

Continuing at same spot as yesterday at 12:05p. Right side of main trail on long, narrow rocky peninsula between bay and inlet. 
--
—Dan


Re: Wilson's warblers on Rosemary

 

Hi Barbara,

I suspect you're probably seeing Lesser or American Goldfinches. They too are small yellowish birds with black caps.

They likelihood of seeing "3 (or more)"!! Wilson's Warblers in Northern California mid-winter is extremely low and I dare say unheard of.

Even when this species is moving through at peak migration (April-May and again August-September) seeing multiple birds together away from good habitat is unusual in the City.

Dominik


On Jan 15, 2020, at 10:33, Barbara London via Groups.Io <sfcraig2005@...> wrote:

We have had 3 (or more) wilson's warblers visit our yard (outer, outer Parkside) and they really like our rosemary shrubs.   We have the shorter, prostrating (but not prostrate) forms of this plant. We have seen these birds in our yard in December.   I was under the impression that these birds are not in San Francisco during the winter.  Easy to recognize with their black caps and yellowish bodies.


Re: Wilson's warblers on Rosemary

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

HI Barbara. Thanks for Posting your sighting here. You are right, Wilson’s Warbler would be very rare in winter in SF. As well it would be unusual for them to feed in Rosemary. The bird that is common on Rosemary and fits the description is Lesser Goldfinch. They are yellowish with dark caps, at least the males. Have a look and see if that makes sense. If not, snap a photo and post it.

  Good birding!

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: SFBirds@groups.io <SFBirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Barbara London via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 10:34 AM
To: SFBirds@groups.io
Cc: SFBirds@groups.io
Subject: [SFBirds] Wilson's warblers on Rosemary

 

We have had 3 (or more) wilson's warblers visit our yard (outer, outer Parkside) and they really like our rosemary shrubs.   We have the shorter, prostrating (but not prostrate) forms of this plant. We have seen these birds in our yard in December.   I was under the impression that these birds are not in San Francisco during the winter.  Easy to recognize with their black caps and yellowish bodies.


Wilson's warblers on Rosemary

Barbara London <sfcraig2005@...>
 

We have had 3 (or more) wilson's warblers visit our yard (outer, outer Parkside) and they really like our rosemary shrubs.   We have the shorter, prostrating (but not prostrate) forms of this plant. We have seen these birds in our yard in December.   I was under the impression that these birds are not in San Francisco during the winter.  Easy to recognize with their black caps and yellowish bodies.


SF bayside: No place for old bunnies.

bitanangan
 

Hi Birders,
     This morning at Yosemite Slough Restoration an early F,M pair of Barn Swallows were foraging above the garden pond. Also watched an unattended/feral dog (stocky, orange-brown) chase (at high speed) a jack rabbit, and that after it forced about 20 geese into flight. It appeared the rabbit may have been too quick for the dog and quite possibly made it to the fence and maybe beneath it to the safety of the shipyard. A second unattended dog, an extremely porky white pit bull, watched from the plateau. These animals may be living at a nearby homeless camp and are not the same unleashed dogs that live at the corner of Thomas and Griffith. This, after watching several evocative episodes of The Hunt with David Attenborough last night. Anyway this park is a worsening mess: busted main gate allowing in trucks and cars, muddy tire ruts, motocross track and dumped trash. The city’s last, remaining Black-tailed Jackrabbits residing mainly at CSRA and in the adjacent shipyard seem doomed to local extirpation. I question the state of California’s ability to manage this otherwise unique and interesting park, indeed it appears that State Parks is no longer trying! 
     Logan Kahle’s Black Skimmer was still visible at 1 PM at Heron’s Head resting near a tidal outlet-channel.
     Hillpoint park has a banded immature Redtail: purple K27. Photo on ebird.
Russ Bright
SF
      






Re: Skimmer at Heron’s Head Park right now

Sarah Burton
 

The light has faded, but the Black Skimmer is still here, as well as one female Cinnamon Teal, 13 Western Meadowlark, and six Black-necked Stilt in same area. I did not find the Rock Sandpiper at the end of the path (were someone is fishing).

On Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 16:57 Sarah Burton via Groups.Io <burtosarah=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Rynchops is still here. The bird is in its previously reported location here a Heron's Head. Thank you for posting, Logan, and thank you to Linda S. for pointing it out.

On Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 10:56 Logan Kahle <logan@...> wrote:
Roosting with gulls half way out the peninsula on the south side. Here (37.7373599, -122.3714069)

Rock sand also still present at tip.

Logan Kahle
San Francisco




Re: Skimmer at Heron’s Head Park right now

Sarah Burton
 

Rynchops is still here. The bird is in its previously reported location here a Heron's Head. Thank you for posting, Logan, and thank you to Linda S. for pointing it out.

On Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 10:56 Logan Kahle <logan@...> wrote:
Roosting with gulls half way out the peninsula on the south side. Here (37.7373599, -122.3714069)

Rock sand also still present at tip.

Logan Kahle
San Francisco




Eurasian Wigeons at Pier 94

Dan Harris
 

Yesterday, Monday late morning, I saw a Eurasian Wigeon male-female pair swimming together at Pier 94.


I noticed the male Eurasian’s red-brown head right away in the sunlight when I scanned the American Wigeon flocks with my bins, and I quickly started taking photos. I was happy to see the male Eurasian and didn’t realize there was also a female until I looked at my photos later after dinner. I’ve only seen a male in previous years. 


Apparently two Eurasian Wigeons this time of year at that location is unusual as flags went up when I changed my entry on eBird from one to two.


They were quite some distance away, but the photo is good enough for an ID.


—Dan Harris

San Francisco




Black Turnstones at Aq. Park

George Robin
 

I saw 5 Black Turnstones yesterday,  1/13/20 on the steps to the aquatic  park cove behind the Maritime museum, west end...picking around corners and the green algae on the steps.









Skimmer at Heron’s Head Park right now

Logan Kahle
 

Roosting with gulls half way out the peninsula on the south side. Here (37.7373599, -122.3714069)

Rock sand also still present at tip.

Logan Kahle
San Francisco


Re: Townsend Warbler in Glen Park bird bath

B Westree
 

I get orange crowned, Townsend, and yellow rumps in my bird bath all the time. My bath has heavy vegatation within a foot so there’s lots of cover. 


On Jan 13, 2020, at 10:12 PM, Roberta Guise <roberta@...> wrote:

A typically stunning male flitted around the garden at 3:30pm, then plopped into the bird bath for about 20 seconds.

Is bird bath bathing normal behavior for a warbler?

Happy birding trails,
Roberta Guise


Townsend Warbler in Glen Park bird bath

Roberta Guise
 

A typically stunning male flitted around the garden at 3:30pm, then plopped into the bird bath for about 20 seconds.

Is bird bath bathing normal behavior for a warbler?

Happy birding trails,
Roberta Guise


Re: Yellow-bellied/Red-naped Sapsucker (McLaren Park: McNab Pond)

Daniel Scali
 

Hello all,

Again today a number of folks went in search of the sapsucker with no finds. Wesley Fritz down in Santa Barbara has a lot of experience with sapsuckers and gave some tips to figure out if the bird is likely to stay. Most importantly he said they don't like people too much -- I hope I didn't scare it away.

Wesley and others with experience have weighed in. Nobody thinks it is a pure Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. Most are hesitant to call it a pure Red-naped based on age and a few odd plumage details (not sure what they are).

I realized there are actually a few decent photos in the bad ones I didn't share yesterday. Sent those to Wesley and I'll see if I can show them to Mr. Pyle as well.

Good birding,
Dan 


Re: Yellow-bellied/Red-naped Sapsucker (McLaren Park: McNab Pond)

Daniel Scali
 

Hi bird people,

I was able to view and photograph the drumming and foraging sapsucker for about 45 min this morning from 11:00 am. I had no experience with comparing these two sometimes identical (nearly) species so I didn't know exactly what I was looking for. The bird would climb a branch inspecting its holes or making new ones, then fly down to another branch. I know it spent time on at least 2 of the Oaks. The light was only a little challenging from the substantial canopy.

A bunch of better birders than me came out for the bird (a victory for McLaren!!!). Alas. Just before Adam Winer arrived (about noon), as I was looking at my phone, a shadow swooped off low behind me -- towards University Ave -- and the sapsucker had not been refound by me or others when I took off at 3:30 pm. I really hope it comes back.

Directions from earlier: Go South on University past the driveway for McNab Pond
(Louis Sutter Playground) and halfway up the steep road. It was foraging
sap holes in the oaks there. Just a little down from the light blue house.

Here's my ebird list with what I feel are the most diagnostic photo angles. Personally I'm stumped :)


- Dan


Blackburnian Warbler Update

Leslie Bienenfeld
 

I've noticed folks continue to visit Duboce Park in search of the blackburnian warbler. I wanted to add that I see it (her?) often outside of 461 Waller St. She hops around on the sidewalk and sits in the branches of the tree-lined street. I saw her there around 4:15 pm today, and I often see her there in the morning. Good luck!
 


Red-Naped or Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Daniel Scali
 

At McLaren Park. Go South on University past the driveway for McNab Pond (Louis Sutter Playground) and halfway up the steep road. It was foraging sap holes in the oaks there. Just a little down from the light blue house.

I’m heading off but will be nearby. Email me if you need any location help.

Sweet!
Dan Scali


Rock Sandpiper, site loyal at HHP

Eddie Bartley
 

Got out to Heron's Head in the afternoon on January 10, 2020 in gorgeous weather, low tide after the King Tide in the morning. Birds were very active.

Nice diversity too, 53 species in a 90 minute visit. Nothing exceptional save the continuing ROCK SANDPIPER. Out at the tip, virtually the same area as where Ben and Teresa found it on November 2. 

Very large raft of Aechmophorus Grebes spread about, well over 100. Fair amount of diving ducks but Scaup continue to be nearly absent at HHP compared to the early 2000's but there were about a dozen this afternoon along the India Basin shore. A single Marsh Wren and Lesser Goldfinch rounded out the less common birds at this site.

Happy Trails!

Eddie Bartley


Fort Mason Local Interest Orchard Oriole, etc.

David Assmann
 

No 2020 new arrivals, but continuing overwintering birds include the male ORCHARD ORIOLE in the Community Garden, the WANDERING TATTLER on the abandoned pier (the only place in San Francisco with overwintering Tattlers), and a NASHVILLE WARBLER in the garden. Six WESTERN MEADOWLARKS appear to commute between the Great Meadow and Fort Mason and the Moscone Softball Fields. This morning the raptor activity included a MERLIN, a COOPER'S HAWK and a RED-TAILED HAWK. WESTERN BLUEBIRDS have been showing up periodically (1 today, 3 yesterday). ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRDS are displaying and gathering nesting material. Although not seen today, a YELLOW-SHAFTED NORTHERN FLICKER and an Integrade NORTHERN FLICKER are spending a lot of time together (photographed together multiple times over the past few weeks).


RB Grosbeak Continues @ BG

Ken Moy
 

Same tree, seen for 5 minutes around 9:20. Nashville Warbler and gray hooded Orange-crowned Warbler also in the area.