Date   

Northern Gannet longevity

Joe Morlan
 

The only California record of Northern Gannet was first noted on the
Farallons 25 April 2012 and continued at various locations around San
Francisco Bay for almost eight years. The latest eBird record seems to be
28 January 2020 also from the Farallons.

Is anybody aware of more recent sightings of this individual? Given the pet
name "Morris" (Morus?) by some, is he gone?
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA


Re: Seeking ID assistance

Jessica Bolton
 

Hi all,

Here is the verdict on the species ID and a collation of the feedback regarding key characteristics:

1. Red-breasted sapsucker
  • Sapsuckers usually show a prominent white wing stripe, but it can get hidden, and other features look good.  The red on the head seems rather limited, so I'd say a juvenile (or molting)
    Red-breasted Sapsucker.

2. Nuttall’s Woodpecker 
  • Downy or Hairy (the other common species in SF) don’t have that barred pattern. 
  • Note the stripes on the back.
  • note ladder-back, and not a vertical white line down back like downy or hairy woodpecker
  • Nuttall’s has bars Downey is black with Center white stripe
  • You can tell by the stripes across his back
  • strongly "ladder-backed", and extensive red on crown. 

3. Hermit thrush
  • the only catharus thrush here in winter.  The second photo doesn't show as strong markings below as some, but it does show the eye ring, and the rusty tail i  the first photo is a giveaway.


4. Red-tailed hawk 
  • 1st year bird so it doesn’t yet have red tail. 
  • White upper chest and but does have dark belly feathers
  • Note the dark belly band. 
  • note white upper breast and blobby dark belly band, tails are brown in their first year of life


5. Red-shouldered hawk 
  • Note the reddish breast and belly 
  • A red-shouldered has a reddish unmarked chest and black and white bars on the tail
  • superficially like Cooper's hawk, and similar size, but note white speckling on wings, brown head and, while not a great field mark in the field, eye color is helpful in this photo. Buteos like Red-shoulders have tan/brown eyes whereas accipiters like Coops have yellow eyes that turn orange to red as they age
  • a Cooper's would not show then strongly barred wings.
  • probably a juvenile Red-shouldered - similar comments about bulk and tail.


Thanks again for tips and advice!

Cheers,
Jess

On Mar 14, 2020, at 2:19 PM, Aimee G <aimgoggins@...> wrote:

Can you please share the responses? They weren’t visible to the group. Thanks, and welcome!

On Mar 14, 2020, at 1:30 PM, Jessica Bolton <jessicajanebolton92@...> wrote:

Thanks so much everyone for the feedback! Some great pointers on features to look out for on the hawks and woodpecker. I really appreciate all the tips! 

Cheers,
Jess


On Mar 14, 2020, at 1:28 PM, Sarah Barsness <slbarsness@...> wrote:

Hi Jessica,
Not sure if anyone responded...you have these all pretty much right!

The second woodpecker is a Nuttal's. You can tell by the stripes across his back. 

The two hawks are Red-tailed and Red-shouldered.

Have fun! Sarah

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 12:04 PM Jessica Bolton <jessicajanebolton92@...> wrote:
Hi all,

I am new to SF birding scene (I moved here from Australia last year) and I am really enjoying getting to know the local species. That said, I have come across a few species that I haven’t been able to verify. I was hoping to get some assistance in ID-ing the following birds. I have narrowed them down to the species I think they might be but I would love confirmation from some local experts. 

1a+1b: Red-breasted Sapsucker? SF Botanical Garden
2: Downy Woodpecker or Nuttall’s Woodpecker? SF Botanical Garden
3a+3b: Hermit thrush? SF Botanical Garden
4: Red-shoulderd Hawk? SF Botanical Garden
5: Cooper’s Hawk? SF Botanical Garden

Many thanks, and happy birding!! 

Cheers,
Jess 

<TBC_1aJPG.jpeg><TBC_1b.jpeg>
<TBC_2JPG.jpeg>
<TBC_3a.jpeg><TBC_3bJPG.jpeg><TBC_4.jpeg>
<TBC_5.jpeg>





Kittiwake Fulton & Ocean Beach

basquebirder
 

There’s a Black-legged Kittiwake in the gull flock at Ocean Beach on Fulton Ave. There were 2 additional birds at the south end off of Sloat too in offshore gull flock. 
Cheers, 
Cédric


Re: Seeking ID assistance

Jessica Bolton
 

Thanks so much everyone for the feedback! Some great pointers on features to look out for on the hawks and woodpecker. I really appreciate all the tips! 

Cheers,
Jess


On Mar 14, 2020, at 1:28 PM, Sarah Barsness <slbarsness@...> wrote:

Hi Jessica,
Not sure if anyone responded...you have these all pretty much right!

The second woodpecker is a Nuttal's. You can tell by the stripes across his back. 

The two hawks are Red-tailed and Red-shouldered.

Have fun! Sarah

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 12:04 PM Jessica Bolton <jessicajanebolton92@...> wrote:
Hi all,

I am new to SF birding scene (I moved here from Australia last year) and I am really enjoying getting to know the local species. That said, I have come across a few species that I haven’t been able to verify. I was hoping to get some assistance in ID-ing the following birds. I have narrowed them down to the species I think they might be but I would love confirmation from some local experts. 

1a+1b: Red-breasted Sapsucker? SF Botanical Garden
2: Downy Woodpecker or Nuttall’s Woodpecker? SF Botanical Garden
3a+3b: Hermit thrush? SF Botanical Garden
4: Red-shoulderd Hawk? SF Botanical Garden
5: Cooper’s Hawk? SF Botanical Garden

Many thanks, and happy birding!! 

Cheers,
Jess 

<TBC_1aJPG.jpeg><TBC_1b.jpeg>
<TBC_2JPG.jpeg>
<TBC_3a.jpeg><TBC_3bJPG.jpeg><TBC_4.jpeg>
<TBC_5.jpeg>




Seeking ID assistance

Jessica Bolton
 

Hi all,

I am new to SF birding scene (I moved here from Australia last year) and I am really enjoying getting to know the local species. That said, I have come across a few species that I haven’t been able to verify. I was hoping to get some assistance in ID-ing the following birds. I have narrowed them down to the species I think they might be but I would love confirmation from some local experts. 

1a+1b: Red-breasted Sapsucker? SF Botanical Garden
2: Downy Woodpecker or Nuttall’s Woodpecker? SF Botanical Garden
3a+3b: Hermit thrush? SF Botanical Garden
4: Red-shoulderd Hawk? SF Botanical Garden
5: Cooper’s Hawk? SF Botanical Garden

Many thanks, and happy birding!! 

Cheers,
Jess 


Re: FOS Western Flycatcher @ Children's Garden in Botanical Garden

 

Western Flycatcher is synonymous with Pacific-slope/Cordilleran. The species split occurred in 1989 and Field Guides prior to then referred to it as Western Flycatcher.

You will often see people refer to silent Pacific-slope/Cordilleran Flycatchers as Western Flycatchers in respect of the difficulty in telling the two species apart visually. 

While the majority of Western Flycatchers that pass through here on the coast are probably Pacific-slope, and the early arrivals to known breeding grounds such as today's Golden Gate Park bird almost certainly so, I have no issue with reports using "Western" Flycatcher. Empidonax are difficult in the field and flippant attitude can often lead problem astray, so no issue with being extra cautious.

For what it's worth, Pacific-slope Flycatcher was unrecorded in the early 90s San Francisco Breeding Bird Atlas but since around 2010 it's been documented as a increasingly common nester in the Presidio, parts of Golden Gate Park and Glen Canyon. Similarly other parts of the state like the coastal slope of San Diego county have been colonized by pacific-slope Flycatchers which appear to be adapting to the mixed exotic "forest" habitat along edges of city parks and throughout suburbs.

Let me know if you have additional questions.

Dominik 


On Mar 13, 2020, at 15:27, Ralph McKinnon <mckinnon_ralph@...> wrote:

My field guides don't show a species named Western Flycatcher. I'm missing something. Maybe you mean Pac Slope?




On Friday, March 13, 2020, 3:20 PM, Dominik Mosur <dominikmosur@...> wrote:

Ralph,

Does original poster's description not match up with what you saw in the field?

Western Wood pewee doesn't typically arrive until mid April at the earliest , main pulse of migrants passing late April through May. They also don't exhibit any sort of "eye ring"

Description and timing are fine for a Western Flycatcher, albeit slightly earlier than the usual 3/20-3/25 range in recent years.

Let us all know, please.

Dominik Mosur



On Mar 13, 2020, at 15:14, Ralph McKinnon via Groups.Io <mckinnon_ralph@...> wrote:

Maybe WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE? Not sure...




On Friday, March 13, 2020, 2:58 PM, Ken Moy <ken.moy62@...> wrote:

Seen this morning around 10:30 for over 5 minutes: upright posture, orange yellow lower mandible and eyering extended past back of eye. Did not vocalize. It was above Muir Pond along with orange crowned and yellow-rumped warblers, pine siskins and ruby-crowned kinglets. Sighted calling Hutton's vireo on path to the pond for the flycatcher/kinglet/vireo trifecta.


Re: FOS Western Flycatcher @ Children's Garden in Botanical Garden

Dario Taraborelli
 

FWIW I was in the exact same location of the Children's Garden as Ken but earlier this morning and later confirmed with him the field marks of the bird I saw around 8:30 on a branch right above the pond at the John Muir Nature Trail and they are consistent with a pac-slope flycatcher. I stayed in the garden a bit longer and scanned again the same trees around 11 but couldn't find it again.


On Fri, Mar 13, 2020 at 3:20 PM Dominik Mosur <dominikmosur@...> wrote:
Ralph,

Does original poster's description not match up with what you saw in the field?

Western Wood pewee doesn't typically arrive until mid April at the earliest , main pulse of migrants passing late April through May. They also don't exhibit any sort of "eye ring"

Description and timing are fine for a Western Flycatcher, albeit slightly earlier than the usual 3/20-3/25 range in recent years.

Let us all know, please.

Dominik Mosur



On Mar 13, 2020, at 15:14, Ralph McKinnon via Groups.Io <mckinnon_ralph@...> wrote:

Maybe WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE? Not sure...




On Friday, March 13, 2020, 2:58 PM, Ken Moy <ken.moy62@...> wrote:

Seen this morning around 10:30 for over 5 minutes: upright posture, orange yellow lower mandible and eyering extended past back of eye. Did not vocalize. It was above Muir Pond along with orange crowned and yellow-rumped warblers, pine siskins and ruby-crowned kinglets. Sighted calling Hutton's vireo on path to the pond for the flycatcher/kinglet/vireo trifecta.


Re: FOS Western Flycatcher @ Children's Garden in Botanical Garden

 

Ralph,

Does original poster's description not match up with what you saw in the field?

Western Wood pewee doesn't typically arrive until mid April at the earliest , main pulse of migrants passing late April through May. They also don't exhibit any sort of "eye ring"

Description and timing are fine for a Western Flycatcher, albeit slightly earlier than the usual 3/20-3/25 range in recent years.

Let us all know, please.

Dominik Mosur



On Mar 13, 2020, at 15:14, Ralph McKinnon via Groups.Io <mckinnon_ralph@...> wrote:

Maybe WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE? Not sure...




On Friday, March 13, 2020, 2:58 PM, Ken Moy <ken.moy62@...> wrote:

Seen this morning around 10:30 for over 5 minutes: upright posture, orange yellow lower mandible and eyering extended past back of eye. Did not vocalize. It was above Muir Pond along with orange crowned and yellow-rumped warblers, pine siskins and ruby-crowned kinglets. Sighted calling Hutton's vireo on path to the pond for the flycatcher/kinglet/vireo trifecta.


Meadowlarks

Karen Stern
 

small flock of meadowlarks at Crissy Field between the lagoon and bay


Re: FOS Western Flycatcher @ Children's Garden in Botanical Garden

Ralph McKinnon
 

Maybe WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE? Not sure...




On Friday, March 13, 2020, 2:58 PM, Ken Moy <ken.moy62@...> wrote:

Seen this morning around 10:30 for over 5 minutes: upright posture, orange yellow lower mandible and eyering extended past back of eye. Did not vocalize. It was above Muir Pond along with orange crowned and yellow-rumped warblers, pine siskins and ruby-crowned kinglets. Sighted calling Hutton's vireo on path to the pond for the flycatcher/kinglet/vireo trifecta.


FOS Western Flycatcher @ Children's Garden in Botanical Garden

Ken Moy
 

Seen this morning around 10:30 for over 5 minutes: upright posture, orange yellow lower mandible and eyering extended past back of eye. Did not vocalize. It was above Muir Pond along with orange crowned and yellow-rumped warblers, pine siskins and ruby-crowned kinglets. Sighted calling Hutton's vireo on path to the pond for the flycatcher/kinglet/vireo trifecta.


Summer Tanager - GGP Log Cabin Trail

Brian Turner
 

Likely the same wintering female Summer Tanager seen on/off this winter @ Lily Pond and McLaren Lodge. Today at one p.m. at the east end of Log Cabin trail where it meets the east lawn, nicely sheltered by some big southern wind gusts. Some reddish appearing in the tail. 

A few rough binocam photos on ebird checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S65752562

Good birding and good health to all,

Brian Turner


Re: What is this hawk?

Sarah Burton
 

I went straight to patagials. This is fun!


On Fri, Mar 13, 2020 at 12:57 PM Pamela Llewellyn via Groups.Io <pamelallewellyn=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Also, light primary wing panels

Pamlela Llewellyn
CPESC, QSD, QSP
Stormwater Professional
510-316-8932


On Friday, March 13, 2020, 09:54:54 AM PDT, Pamela Llewellyn <pamelallewellyn@...> wrote:


My first impression was juv dark morph RTHA.  Dark head, white breast, heavily streaked belly and under wing coverts, finely banded tail.

Pamlela Llewellyn
CPESC, QSD, QSP
Stormwater Professional
510-316-8932


On Friday, March 13, 2020, 08:12:42 AM PDT, Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:


I’ll look at it again. I thought it hovered more like RLHA and the bill seemed small for RT. But it was a 5-second look, maybe too quick. P

> On Mar 12, 2020, at 21:12, Mila Zinkova <milazinkova@...> wrote:
>
> Thank you, everybody.
> Most responders believe it is a red-tailed hawk.
> One responder believes it is dark-morph Rough-legged Hawk.
> Than you one more time for all responses!
> Mila.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Mar 12, 2020, at 8:43 PM, Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
>>
>> dark-morph Rough-legged Hawk



Re: What is this hawk?

Pamela Llewellyn
 

Also, light primary wing panels

Pamlela Llewellyn
CPESC, QSD, QSP
Stormwater Professional
510-316-8932


On Friday, March 13, 2020, 09:54:54 AM PDT, Pamela Llewellyn <pamelallewellyn@...> wrote:


My first impression was juv dark morph RTHA.  Dark head, white breast, heavily streaked belly and under wing coverts, finely banded tail.

Pamlela Llewellyn
CPESC, QSD, QSP
Stormwater Professional
510-316-8932


On Friday, March 13, 2020, 08:12:42 AM PDT, Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:


I’ll look at it again. I thought it hovered more like RLHA and the bill seemed small for RT. But it was a 5-second look, maybe too quick. P

> On Mar 12, 2020, at 21:12, Mila Zinkova <milazinkova@...> wrote:
>
> Thank you, everybody.
> Most responders believe it is a red-tailed hawk.
> One responder believes it is dark-morph Rough-legged Hawk.
> Than you one more time for all responses!
> Mila.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Mar 12, 2020, at 8:43 PM, Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
>>
>> dark-morph Rough-legged Hawk



Re: What is this hawk?

Pamela Llewellyn
 

My first impression was juv dark morph RTHA.  Dark head, white breast, heavily streaked belly and under wing coverts, finely banded tail.

Pamlela Llewellyn
CPESC, QSD, QSP
Stormwater Professional
510-316-8932


On Friday, March 13, 2020, 08:12:42 AM PDT, Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:


I’ll look at it again. I thought it hovered more like RLHA and the bill seemed small for RT. But it was a 5-second look, maybe too quick. P

> On Mar 12, 2020, at 21:12, Mila Zinkova <milazinkova@...> wrote:
>
> Thank you, everybody.
> Most responders believe it is a red-tailed hawk.
> One responder believes it is dark-morph Rough-legged Hawk.
> Than you one more time for all responses!
> Mila.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Mar 12, 2020, at 8:43 PM, Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
>>
>> dark-morph Rough-legged Hawk



Re: What is this hawk?

Peter Pyle
 

Having had a chance to look at it more the plumage falls within range of variation for dark-morph juvenile Red-tailed and not Rough-legged, particularly in lacking a dark tail tip, having uniform underparts, and the dark face/hood as others have pointed out. I had not gone beyond the first two clips when looking quickly last night, which give it more of a RLHA look; e.g., the small-looking head and bill when looking away from the camera. But it looks much more like a RTHA in shape during later clips with the raven, etc.

Peter

At 08:12 PM 3/12/2020, Mila Zinkova wrote:
Hello,
I filmed it at tween peaks
<https://youtu.be/9jtLnm074yU>https://youtu.be/9jtLnm074yU
Thanks,

Mila.


Re: What is this hawk?

Peter Pyle
 

I’ll look at it again. I thought it hovered more like RLHA and the bill seemed small for RT. But it was a 5-second look, maybe too quick. P

On Mar 12, 2020, at 21:12, Mila Zinkova <milazinkova@...> wrote:

Thank you, everybody.
Most responders believe it is a red-tailed hawk.
One responder believes it is dark-morph Rough-legged Hawk.
Than you one more time for all responses!
Mila.

Sent from my iPad

On Mar 12, 2020, at 8:43 PM, Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:

dark-morph Rough-legged Hawk


Re: What is this hawk?

Mila Zinkova
 

Thank you, everybody.
Most responders believe it is a red-tailed hawk.
One responder believes it is dark-morph Rough-legged Hawk.
Than you one more time for all responses!
Mila.

On Mar 12, 2020, at 8:43 PM, Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:

dark-morph Rough-legged Hawk


Re: What is this hawk?

Peter Pyle
 

Hi Mila -

Looks like a dark-morph Rough-legged Hawk. Good bird for SF.

Cheers, Peter

At 08:12 PM 3/12/2020, Mila Zinkova wrote:
Hello,
I filmed it at tween peaks
<https://youtu.be/9jtLnm074yU>https://youtu.be/9jtLnm074yU
Thanks,

Mila.


What is this hawk?

Mila Zinkova
 

Hello,
I filmed it at tween peaks
Thanks,

Mila.