Date   

Chestnut sided warbler on Sutro Heights

Nico Stuurman
 

Michaela and I located a Chestnut Sided Warbler while looking for the Brewer's Sparrow on Sutro Heights.

Nico
--
Nico Stuurman


Re: Philadelphia Vireo concrete bridge 10/8

bilal al-shahwany
 

On Friday, October 9, 2020, 09:25:59 AM PDT, Teale Fristoe <fristoe@...> wrote:


The Philadelphia vireo found yesterday (thanks guys!) Continues this morning. It was seen well by several birders around 9:15 in the same large clump of willows south of the west end of the concrete bridge. Seems to be traveling with bushtits 

Teale Fristoe
Berkeley

On Thu, Oct 8, 2020, 2:56 PM David Nickerson via groups.io <davidnickerson=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
Philadelphia Vireo continues at 2:45 PM today in same general area as reported earlier.
> On Oct 8, 2020, at 12:10 PM, Logan Kahle <logan@...> wrote:
>
> Hi All,
>
> Cédric “Basque🅱️irder” Duhalde and I just found a Philadelphia Vireo in w a mixed bushtits and chickadees along john muir on the west side of the lake about 100 meters south of the bridge here (37.7110203, -122.4884579). Its a relatively drab phili with a bright yellow throat, grayish white belly and bright yellow undertail coverts.
>
> Best,
> Logan
>
>
>
>
>






Chestnut sided warbler location

Rachel Lawrence
 

I meant to say it was south of the fountain in the Big Meadow approx where Logan spotted the Tennessee last night


Re: Brewer's Sparrow Sutro Hghts Park

Brian Fitch
 

Brewer’s continues on the main lawn at Sutro Heights.  Saw it with David A prior to 11AM 
Brian Fitch

On Thu, Oct 8, 2020 at 1:29 PM Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S74574781



At 11:28 AM 10/8/2020, Peter Pyle wrote:

>Will check pics. In w/WCSP in from 48th St/Anza entrance.














Another chestnut sided warbler

Rachel Lawrence
 

In SF botanicals approx 8.30am. I lost it after a short while and could not relocate.


Re: Philadelphia Vireo concrete bridge 10/8

Teale Fristoe
 

The Philadelphia vireo found yesterday (thanks guys!) Continues this morning. It was seen well by several birders around 9:15 in the same large clump of willows south of the west end of the concrete bridge. Seems to be traveling with bushtits 

Teale Fristoe
Berkeley

On Thu, Oct 8, 2020, 2:56 PM David Nickerson via groups.io <davidnickerson=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
Philadelphia Vireo continues at 2:45 PM today in same general area as reported earlier.
> On Oct 8, 2020, at 12:10 PM, Logan Kahle <logan@...> wrote:
>
> Hi All,
>
> Cédric “Basque🅱️irder” Duhalde and I just found a Philadelphia Vireo in w a mixed bushtits and chickadees along john muir on the west side of the lake about 100 meters south of the bridge here (37.7110203, -122.4884579). Its a relatively drab phili with a bright yellow throat, grayish white belly and bright yellow undertail coverts.
>
> Best,
> Logan
>
>
>
>
>






Re: Westside SF 10/8/2020

Eddie Monson
 

Hello all, 
To add to the report from yesterday, I went over to chase the Philadelphia Vireo Logan and Cédric found and although I dipped on that I had 2 Blackpoll warblers at the very west end of the VG canal. This area is proving to be a collector of rarities and migrants right now and is a lot of fun to bird.
Good birding
Eddie

On Thu, Oct 8, 2020 at 10:16 PM Logan Kahle <logan@...> wrote:
Hi All,

Today I birded around Western San Francisco, primarily the southwest
part, joined for the majority by Cédric Duhalde. Conditions were mostly
overcast (getting a little foggier at times) with light SW winds and
mild to cool temps. In the past week or two the birding has really
transitioned to feeling more like Fall to more like Winter, with a large
exodus of Yellow, Wilson's, and Black-throated Gray Warblers, Warbling
Vireos, Western Tanagers being replaced by swarms of Townsend's Warblers
and Sparrows and increased numbers of Yellow-rumps (though not nearly at
the numbers they'll be in a couple months). Nonetheless, we managed to
eek out a few interesting birds among the winteresque swarms.

We started at Fort Funston hoping the interesting conditions would bring
in some wayward goodies. We covered a lot of regions I'd never checked
in the area before, including the section between the olympic club and
the beach. We ran into Peter Pyle who'd had the same idea as us but came
out similarly skunked. While goodies were nowhere to be found, a few
observations of interest were:
House Wren-3 was a nice count
Bewick's Wren-6
Purple Finch-18 were some of few birds actively on the move today
Savannah Sparrow-1 migrant on the golf course
Lincoln's Sparrow-2
Nashville Warbler-1
Common Yellowthroat-5 seemed like a nice migrant push in the scrub
Yellow Warbler-1

Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74588403


We then hit the South Lake Merced region, walking around the Golf Course
briefly then checking the Vista Grande Canal, willows along John Muir
Drive, briefly checking the Terry Duel Site and Brotherhood Gulch before
wrapping around to the penguin statue, willow trail, concrete bridge and
finally gun club marsh. We found more migrants here than at Funston,
with little flocks scattered through the region. Highlights here were:
PHILADELPHIA VIREO-1 at coordinates mentioned in previous post. A
relatively drab bird for this species. Sounds like others had success
with it later in the day, so hopefully it'll stick around a few more days
Warbling Vireo-2
MAGNOLIA WARBLER-1 at the edge of Gun Club Marsh was likely the same
bird Jonah found earlier this week
Yellow Warbler-2 exemplified their outward push recently
Hermit Warbler-1 at VG canal
Wilson's Warbler-1

Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74588560

At the golf course, a large sparrow flock contained 3 lincoln's and a
Spotted Towhee. At Brotherhood Gulch we were very surprised to find a
migrant MARSH WREN in the Willows (!), the only migrant of this species
I've seen in the city away from marshy habitats. Terry Duel was slow and
boring because it is in San Mateo county.

We briefly checked Pine Lake Park before splitting up, which held a
decent assortment of migrants but nothing unusual.

I proceeded north to Golden Gate Park where I spent a couple hours
toodling around the Botanical Garden. The area was very active despite
the late hour, and I managed to find a good number of mixed flocks
scattered around. Warbler diversity here was nice but still very clearly
down in terms of non-wintering birds. Highlights included:
Pacific-sloped Flycatcher-1
BEWICK'S WREN-1 was a complete surprise, and was just my second ever for
the park. Seen by the reservoir
Lincoln's Sparrow-1
TENNESSEE WARBLER-1 bird on the southwest side of the big meadow near
the entrance (just south of the dry fountain)
Orange-crowned Warbler-5 including one gray-headed bird
Nashville Warbler-1
Yellow Warbler-6

Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74588700

Finally, I stopped briefly at the Polo Fields where a couple of
White-fronted Geese and Two Cackling Geese have set up shop among the
Canadas. One of the cacklers is an Aluetian and the other is a very
confusing, small, pale bird. I'm not positive what subspecies it is but
it may turn out to be something interesting. Also a single Meadowlark
flew in at dusk.

Enjoy the last few weeks of FALL!

Logan






Clay Colored Sparrow, Pectoral Sandpiper and Long-Billed Dowitchers at Yosemite Slough

David Assmann
 

Yesterday morning a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was sitting on the fence in front of the pond at Yosemite Slough. A PECTORAL SANDPIPER and seven LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS were in the pond, along with my FOS AMERICAN WIGEONS (15 of them).


Westside SF 10/8/2020

Logan Kahle
 

Hi All,

Today I birded around Western San Francisco, primarily the southwest part, joined for the majority by Cédric Duhalde. Conditions were mostly overcast (getting a little foggier at times) with light SW winds and mild to cool temps. In the past week or two the birding has really transitioned to feeling more like Fall to more like Winter, with a large exodus of Yellow, Wilson's, and Black-throated Gray Warblers, Warbling Vireos, Western Tanagers being replaced by swarms of Townsend's Warblers and Sparrows and increased numbers of Yellow-rumps (though not nearly at the numbers they'll be in a couple months). Nonetheless, we managed to eek out a few interesting birds among the winteresque swarms.

We started at Fort Funston hoping the interesting conditions would bring in some wayward goodies. We covered a lot of regions I'd never checked in the area before, including the section between the olympic club and the beach. We ran into Peter Pyle who'd had the same idea as us but came out similarly skunked. While goodies were nowhere to be found, a few observations of interest were:
House Wren-3 was a nice count
Bewick's Wren-6
Purple Finch-18 were some of few birds actively on the move today
Savannah Sparrow-1 migrant on the golf course
Lincoln's Sparrow-2
Nashville Warbler-1
Common Yellowthroat-5 seemed like a nice migrant push in the scrub
Yellow Warbler-1

Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74588403


We then hit the South Lake Merced region, walking around the Golf Course briefly then checking the Vista Grande Canal, willows along John Muir Drive, briefly checking the Terry Duel Site and Brotherhood Gulch before wrapping around to the penguin statue, willow trail, concrete bridge and finally gun club marsh. We found more migrants here than at Funston, with little flocks scattered through the region. Highlights here were:
PHILADELPHIA VIREO-1 at coordinates mentioned in previous post. A relatively drab bird for this species. Sounds like others had success with it later in the day, so hopefully it'll stick around a few more days
Warbling Vireo-2
MAGNOLIA WARBLER-1 at the edge of Gun Club Marsh was likely the same bird Jonah found earlier this week
Yellow Warbler-2 exemplified their outward push recently
Hermit Warbler-1 at VG canal
Wilson's Warbler-1

Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74588560

At the golf course, a large sparrow flock contained 3 lincoln's and a Spotted Towhee. At Brotherhood Gulch we were very surprised to find a migrant MARSH WREN in the Willows (!), the only migrant of this species I've seen in the city away from marshy habitats. Terry Duel was slow and boring because it is in San Mateo county.

We briefly checked Pine Lake Park before splitting up, which held a decent assortment of migrants but nothing unusual.

I proceeded north to Golden Gate Park where I spent a couple hours toodling around the Botanical Garden. The area was very active despite the late hour, and I managed to find a good number of mixed flocks scattered around. Warbler diversity here was nice but still very clearly down in terms of non-wintering birds. Highlights included:
Pacific-sloped Flycatcher-1
BEWICK'S WREN-1 was a complete surprise, and was just my second ever for the park. Seen by the reservoir
Lincoln's Sparrow-1
TENNESSEE WARBLER-1 bird on the southwest side of the big meadow near the entrance (just south of the dry fountain)
Orange-crowned Warbler-5 including one gray-headed bird
Nashville Warbler-1
Yellow Warbler-6

Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74588700

Finally, I stopped briefly at the Polo Fields where a couple of White-fronted Geese and Two Cackling Geese have set up shop among the Canadas. One of the cacklers is an Aluetian and the other is a very confusing, small, pale bird. I'm not positive what subspecies it is but it may turn out to be something interesting. Also a single Meadowlark flew in at dusk.

Enjoy the last few weeks of FALL!

Logan


Re: Philadelphia Vireo concrete bridge 10/8

David Nickerson
 

Philadelphia Vireo continues at 2:45 PM today in same general area as reported earlier.

On Oct 8, 2020, at 12:10 PM, Logan Kahle <logan@archive.org> wrote:

Hi All,

Cédric “Basque🅱️irder” Duhalde and I just found a Philadelphia Vireo in w a mixed bushtits and chickadees along john muir on the west side of the lake about 100 meters south of the bridge here (37.7110203, -122.4884579). Its a relatively drab phili with a bright yellow throat, grayish white belly and bright yellow undertail coverts.

Best,
Logan





Re: Philadelphia Vireo concrete bridge 10/8

David Nickerson
 

On Oct 8, 2020, at 12:10 PM, Logan Kahle <logan@archive.org> wrote:

Hi All,

Cédric “Basque🅱️irder” Duhalde and I just found a Philadelphia Vireo in w a mixed bushtits and chickadees along john muir on the west side of the lake about 100 meters south of the bridge here (37.7110203, -122.4884579). Its a relatively drab phili with a bright yellow throat, grayish white belly and bright yellow undertail coverts.

Best,
Logan





Brewer's Sparrow Sutro Hghts Park

Peter Pyle
 

At 11:28 AM 10/8/2020, Peter Pyle wrote:
Will check pics. In w/WCSP in from 48th St/Anza entrance.


Philadelphia Vireo concrete bridge 10/8

Logan Kahle
 

Hi All,

Cédric “Basque🅱️irder” Duhalde and I just found a Philadelphia Vireo in w a mixed bushtits and chickadees along john muir on the west side of the lake about 100 meters south of the bridge here (37.7110203, -122.4884579). Its a relatively drab phili with a bright yellow throat, grayish white belly and bright yellow undertail coverts.

Best,
Logan


Tonight's Sequoia Audubon Meeting - Cape to Cape Adventures w/ Joe Morlan!

Davena Gentry
 

Join us TONIGHT 10/8, for our Monthly Meeting Program with Joe Morlan. His "Cape to Cape" presentation will feature birds and wildlife encountered during a three week cruise from Chile to South Africa March 2018! Find registration info: sequoia-audubon.org White morph Southern Giant-Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) 8 March 2018 Cooper Bay, South Georgia. Courtesy of Joe Morlan


Probable Brewer’s Sparrow Sutro Hghts Park

Peter Pyle
 

Will check pics. In w/WCSP in from 48th St/Anza entrance.


Pelagic trip report - Sun Oct 4.

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Hello all,

    Belated trip report, it has been a busy week. Yes, the season has turned, the late season birds are here. Overall the weather was a bit less amenable than the forecast had suggested, this meant we had to go a bit farther north into the weather to get offshore. It worked, and were able to drive south in a following sea through the Pioneer Canyon and then stayed off the continental shelf until we had to head back to port. We started off nicely with a pair of Marbled Murrelets close to shore as well as a couple of Parasitic Jaegers. Heading offshore I did get a very troubling feeling, there was little to nothing other than Common Murres as we went out, it took a long time to see a shearwater! In fact I saw an Ashy Storm-Petrel before I saw a Sooty Shearwater on this trip. But once we arrived at the continental shelf things began to sort out with Sooty, Pink-footed, and Buller’s shearwaters, Black-footed Albatross, as well as Rhinoceros and Cassin’s Auklets. It was a good day for Rhino Auklets, lots out there. Perhaps associated with these numbers we found two Tufted Puffins, a juvenile and a non-breeding adult; puffins at this time of year are very neat to see, so different from the summer. Heading south we picked up more Ashy Storm-Petrels, many Black Storm-Petrels and a Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel. South Polar Skua, two Long-tailed Jaegers (together) and Pomarine jaegers gave us the skua-jaeger “grand slam.” We picked up Blue Whales, which have been hard to find in central CA, we were able to share this information with Monterey Bay Whalewatch who are working with a TV/Film crew (BBC??) and they have been looking for Blue Whales, fortunately our magic spot worked for them a couple of days later and they were able to get some footage that we may see in a documentary in the future!

    On our way back more Buller’s Shearwaters showed up, and a flock of Sooty Shearwaters had an individual that was flying around with a darker underwing, a Short-tailed Shearwater. As well, about 10 miles offshore our first of the season Black-vented Shearwater showed up and a few more in the next 20 minutes or so. All jaegers and South Polar Skua, three species of storm-petrels and 5 species of shearwater, diversity is up! We have two spots on Oct 18, and a few more on the 24th remaining. https://www.alvarosadventures.com/pelagic-dates-2020.html

 

Also, I am doing a “Big Walk for Rhinoceros Auklets” a walking big day next week where I am asking for donations to Oikonos for the Año Nuevo Island project, restoring habitat and monitoring Rhinoceros and Cassin’s Auklets on the island. Hopefully I can break 110 species on foot power, and will likely walk about 20 miles assuming I survive!! Please donate – more details here:

https://secure.givelively.org/donate/oikonos-ecosystem-knowledge/alvaro-jaramillo-1

good birding!

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 


Summer Tanager at Bocce Ball Courts GGP 10/07

basquebirder
 

Hi all,

There was a male Summer Tanage this afternoon in the big blooming Metrosideros eucalyptus by the bocce ball courts against a building in east Golden Gate Park. I watched it fly all the way over to the carousel just south of Robin Williams meadow.
Details on checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74551368

Good birding,
Cédric Duhalde


Sparrows in numbers

Richard Bradus
 

Hi all

They're back! 

I had planned to take a look around the Simonds Loop this morning hoping that the Rock Wren or some other notable might still be about, but I never quite got there. Entering the Presidio from the Lyon St./Broadway gate, as I slowly descended through the woodland I walked right into a sparrow-palooza. First a couple of Golden-crowns, then White-crowns, more of both, Juncos (lots and lots of them), Towhee (at least six - the most I've ever seen in one place), a few Fox and Song, then just one swirling cavalcade of all of them, even a White-throated. Our winter regulars are arriving and, from the behavior I saw, many of them are famished and jumpy, feeding like crazy and chasing each other about for the spoils - and unfortunately skittish as well, scattering every time I took a step closer.

Also of some interest: a Creeper that briefly flew down and bathed in a small puddle from dripping fog below one of the pines - the first time I've ever seen a creeper on the ground. And a ?late Swainson's Thrush that flew out of the brush and posed nicely, but briefly, on a fallen log. Few Warblers (just one Yellow and three Townsend's) but Pygmy Nuthatches all over, a couple of early Kinglets and, following faint high pitched calls, a nice flock of Cedar Waxwings eating berries from trees just south of the back of the Simonds Loop houses. Looked like a good amount of activity around Logan's neighborhood (most of the above plus a bunch of Robins, Finches and the like) but I didn't venture any further.

Having chased a number of the "rarities" all of you have been so good at finding and reporting over the past couple of weeks (thank you!), it was nice to just stand and gawk at the spectacle of more typical local birds in good numbers and spirits. Don't overlook the pleasures of the common birds in our midst - they are endlessly entertaining and sometimes surprising. Especially in this stressful time, they are a balm for our souls.

Enjoy!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco



Fort Mason Northern Parula, Nashville Warbler

David Assmann
 

A NORTHERN PARULA was at Fort Mason this morning in a small tree southeast of the garden - don’t know if it is the same one that was seen until mid-September. A NASHVILLE WARBLER was in the Battery. The garden had 3 LINCOLN’S SPARROWS. 2 BONAPARTE’S GULLS flew by over the Bay, and two PEREGRINE FALCONS were going after ROCK PIGEONS in the piers. Still a number of YELLOW WARBLERS moving through and the number of YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS has increased dramatically to about 75.


Lake Merced, concrete bridge, interesting HY plumaged TOWA

Eddie Bartley
 

Left sunny and warm Potrero Hill mid afternoon excited to bird Lake Merced. A mile before we drove into a dense wall of fog. Right down to deck level too but it was mostly birdable and the colors really popped as long as the sky wasn't involved.

Big build up of coots and Ruddy Ducks now just north of the concrete bridge. We were sifting through the coots hoping for a moorhen when a Hatch-year (HY) Red-tail swooped at warp speed tight between us and a benched couple setting off an explosion of wings. Swing and a miss, gave us primates a healthy adrenalin rush too. Didn't find a moorhen but there was coot whose shield was bright yellow with burnt orange in the center so that was pretty cool.

Searching through the willows turned up the usual early October migrants: Warbling Vireo, Common Yellowthroat, Yellow, Yellow-rumped, Townsend's once we got to the east end conifers. RC Kinglet numbers are picking up as are Sooty Foxes. This is one of the only areas in SF where you can still see Brush Rabbits and supplementary feeding has made them tame, which is probably not a good thing for them. The remains of a young Brown Pelican are at the base of south side of the bridge, about 1/3 of the way from west, fairly well scavenged now. Curious how it ended up there.

One HY warbler feeding fairly high and inside a large pine gave us a start. Setophaga mask, looked orangish in face and upper breast but coloration was very limited barely extending past throat. Streaking in the flanks was almost obscure. Was feeding very energetically, moving quickly through the branches, difficult to get on. Thoughts drifted to Blackburnian but managed a couple of good snaps and the auricular pattern looked more like Townsend's. Never did get to see that back. Anyway, for anyone interested in confusing fall warbler shots I plunked one here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74474844

We spent a short time over at Vista Grande too, lots of birds, especially in the upper canopy but the light had gotten so low, the only songbird species we added was a nice looking male Black-throated Gray for the day.

Happy Trails!

Eddie Bartley
Noreen Weeden

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