Date   

Great-tailed Grackles moving around

Aaron Maizlish
 

Twice this morning a pair of Great-tailed Grackles have flown right by my home office window while I was on a conference call.  This is near Mission x Cesar Chavez in a part of the city that has little to no suitable habitat for a Grackle colony.  I can’t say that I’m particularly excited to see them here.  I noted that there have been a few other sightings of Grackles in the city this month, away from their only known breeding colony at Lake Merced. 

So my question is what are they doing?  Are they just migrating through, like everything else right now?  Are they scouting new territories as they continuing their march northward?  Or is this an indication of an effort to form a breeding colony effort in some industrial part of the city?   Grackles are particularly hard on native songbird nests, so while their expansion in the city may be inevitable, in the short term this might not be good on the few sturdy birds that breed in our city parks and street trees.   By the way, though I don’t have any yard I do have a nice view of the neighborhood parklet and the Mission district skyline.  The birds that I see nesting here, within 100 yards of my window are Lesser Goldfinch, House Finch, American Robin, Anna’s Hummingbird, House Sparrow, Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Mourning Dove and Hooded Oriole.

Good grackling,

Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco


Re: [pen-bird] Apparent Kentucky Warbler in Pacifica

Peter Pyle
 

Here’s another paper on the 1992 invasion.


Interestingly, Patten et al. Linked it to anomalous El Nino conditions. I believe the idea was that more SE winds occurred over the Gulf of Mexico during ENSO but they stressed that this should only be considered a hypothesis. 

We are decidedly not experiencing ENSO now, more toward neutral with local conditions (at least) more La-Nina like. So if these records continue it could cause a search for other factors.

Peter

On May 13, 2020, at 07:30, Dan Singer <dsg2@...> wrote:


Hi Birders,

As John mentioned, the spring of 1992 was indeed one to remember. For the many of you who were not birding then, here’s a brief summary from the California Bird Records Committee 18th annual report:

"This unprecedented invasion took place simultaneously with that of the Yellow-throated Vireo (V. flavifrons; 9 birds: see below), Northern Parula (Parula americana; 138 birds), Yellow-throated Warbler (Dendroica dominica: 6 birds: see below), Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorus: 8 birds: see below), Kentucky Warbler (Oporornis formosus: 36 birds: see below), and Hooded Warbler (Wilsonia citrina; 76 birds). This massive incursion of species breeding predominantly in the southeastern United States was discussed by Terrill et al. (1992): more complete details will be published elsewhere.”

Thanks to the efforts of Joe Morlan, information like this can now be easily gleaned from the CBRC website using the search function.


Dan Singer
Marin County



On May 12, 2020, at 17:01, John Sterling <jsterling@...> wrote:

It’s looking like another spring of 1992 when the state had an unprecedented number of hooded and Kentucky warblers along with other southeastern species.  Going to be a fun four weeks if I’m right.
John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

On May 12, 2020, at 4:21 PM, Joe Morlan <jmorlan@...> wrote:

This morning I heard an unusual song along San Pedro Creek in Pacifica.  I
made some audio recordings which have been analyzed by Al Jaramillo and
others.  They are a good match for Kentucky Warbler. However I did not
actually see the bird.  The recordings are on my eBird list at:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S68940561

Recordings are also on Xeno-Canto:

https://www.xeno-canto.org/557569

https://www.xeno-canto.org/557571

https://www.xeno-canto.org/557572

The bird was in the riparian along San Pedro Terrace Rd immediately east of
the Linda Mar Rehabilitation nursing facility.  Please be respectful of the
nursing home residents and property.

Stay well!
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt









Re: [pen-bird] Apparent Kentucky Warbler in Pacifica

Dan Singer
 

Hi Birders,

As John mentioned, the spring of 1992 was indeed one to remember. For the many of you who were not birding then, here’s a brief summary from the California Bird Records Committee 18th annual report:

"This unprecedented invasion took place simultaneously with that of the Yellow-throated Vireo (V. flavifrons; 9 birds: see below), Northern Parula (Parula americana; 138 birds), Yellow-throated Warbler (Dendroica dominica: 6 birds: see below), Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorus: 8 birds: see below), Kentucky Warbler (Oporornis formosus: 36 birds: see below), and Hooded Warbler (Wilsonia citrina; 76 birds). This massive incursion of species breeding predominantly in the southeastern United States was discussed by Terrill et al. (1992): more complete details will be published elsewhere.”

Thanks to the efforts of Joe Morlan, information like this can now be easily gleaned from the CBRC website using the search function.


Dan Singer
Marin County



On May 12, 2020, at 17:01, John Sterling <jsterling@...> wrote:

It’s looking like another spring of 1992 when the state had an unprecedented number of hooded and Kentucky warblers along with other southeastern species.  Going to be a fun four weeks if I’m right.
John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

On May 12, 2020, at 4:21 PM, Joe Morlan <jmorlan@...> wrote:

This morning I heard an unusual song along San Pedro Creek in Pacifica.  I
made some audio recordings which have been analyzed by Al Jaramillo and
others.  They are a good match for Kentucky Warbler. However I did not
actually see the bird.  The recordings are on my eBird list at:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S68940561

Recordings are also on Xeno-Canto:

https://www.xeno-canto.org/557569

https://www.xeno-canto.org/557571

https://www.xeno-canto.org/557572

The bird was in the riparian along San Pedro Terrace Rd immediately east of
the Linda Mar Rehabilitation nursing facility.  Please be respectful of the
nursing home residents and property.

Stay well!
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt









Fuchsia Dell Black-throated Blue Warbler

Elliot Janca
 

As of 7 AM this morning, I found a male Black-throated Blue Warbler at the entrance to the Fuchsia Dell of Eastern GGP.  It flitted about for around a minute before flying off, and I was not able to refind it.  My only photo is attached.


eBird audio processing backlog

Dario Taraborelli
 

Since many people (myself included) are sharing audio recordings of migrants found in the city via eBird, I thought I'd relay a note I got from the folks at Macaulay Library: 

We are experiencing higher than normal uploads of media (close to 100k new uploads over the weekend!) resulting in increased processing time

The processing time at the moment can be over 12 hours.

Dario


Summer tanager at McLaren Park

Ben Dudek
 

On an evening walk around McNab Lake, Teresa and I found a female/immature male Summer tanager in the pines near the northwest corner of the lake where Yale St. ends at the park. We heard soft "pituk" calls first before spotting a large yellow tanager with an orange vent and splotchy yellow-orange on the head. Potentially an eastern female type? 

Snapped some bino-scope phone photos: https://ebird.org/checklist/S68900656

Good birding,
Ben and Teresa


Massive Ggp coverage effort today

Josiah Clark
 

So many sharp eyed birders out this morning working together to cover all the best spots in GGP. Jonah heard a bird that sounded like a northern parula at the rhododendron Dell. Auggie Kramer had a ash-throated flycatcher along Carl Street by Willard while at a job site afterwards.
For my part I worked the presidio over a bit, finding a total of three house wren territories. It really seems as though they are setting up to breed in the city this year. 
As well as the continuing chat at Lobos Creek, lots of migrants from yesterday continued. Yesterday evening had a chipping sparrow across from Presidio hills in the sand pile. 
Hard to believe this is just the beginning of our spring vagrant season, the last two weeks of may, the first 2 weeks of June.

Josiah Clark | Habitat Potential | Consulting Ecologist | 415.317.3978
License #1043929


Bernal Hill

Donna Hayes
 

This morning watched a pygmy nuthatch peck at a pine cone, soon after I went through the gate at the northeast end. It was up the hill (on the east side of the path)

There were several western tanagers singing in the eucalyptus grove near the Esmerelda steps.

A breeding pair of scrub jays are patrolling my backyard and chasing my cats into the house.

The weather has turned quickly from blue skies to deep overcast and rain.

Good birding!

Donna Hayes


Red-eyed vireo at Horseshoe pits

Dario Taraborelli
 

Singing on the big euc just south of horseshoe pits. Found by Paul Saraceni. Continuing at 8:13.


Rose Breasted continues at El Polin

David Assmann
 

Male eating berries


Hooded Warbler + Red-eyed Vireo, Eastern GGP, 5/11

Paul Saraceni
 

The Hooded Warbler continues this morning in the Fuschia Dell.

There’s also a singing RED-EYED VIREO — seen and heard — in the big euc over the oak grove and south of horseshoe pits — 7:45-8:00 am.

Paul Saraceni
San Francisco


Lazuli Bunting - Presidio Ecology Trail

Felix Rigau
 

Lazuli Bunting - Presidio Ecology Trail

 

An end of a day walk in the Presidio yielded my first Lazuli Bunting of the season. The male was actively feeding on the upslope side at the junction of the Lower Ecology Trail and the trail that leads up to Mountain Lake. 


Tufted Puffin & Red Phalaropes, 5/9-10/20

Paul Saraceni
 

I had a few observations of note from Ocean Beach this weekend.

Yesterday (5/9) evening during a beach walk, I stopped at the N end of the beach (just before the Cliff House bluff) for a bit of seawatching with light SW winds.   At 6:35 PM I observed a TUFTED PUFFIN flying N.  I picked-up on it S of Seal Rocks and then it flew just behind the first island and re-appeared on the N side and continued flying N and out of view. It was in beautiful breading plumage.  While there were numerous small groups of Common Murres flying, the puffin was flying by itself.

This morning (5/10) during a seawatch from the S end of the Great Highway I observed a group of 3 RED PHALAROPES in striking alternate plumage as they flew low over the ocean and briefly landed on the surface just beyond the breakers, then continued flying N.

This evening during a beach walk I observed another Red Phalarope, this one a female in stunning breeding plumage.  Around 7:35 PM I observed it fly in off the ocean and land mid-beach, well back from the water, between Kirkham/Lawton. It walked around for a few minutes, picking at the sand (flies?), then flew back out to the ocean in a NW direction.

During each of the 5/9 and 5/10 beach walks I observed a single LONG-BILLED CURLEW flying N high overhead (undoubtedly different individuals) as well as lingering, bleached first-cycle MEW GULLS (2 on 5/9, 3 on 5/10) and a single first-cycle Glaucous-winged Gull.

Two WANDERING TATTLERS were on Seal Rock on 5/9.
 
There was nothing else particularly notable during the seawatch this morning, though there was a nice movement of loons, including 240 Pacifics, 14 Commons (all but 1 in alternate plumage), and 11 Red-throateds.

I also observed a GRAY WHALE this morning as it slowly made its way N.
 
Paul Saraceni 
San Francisco


RoseBeak festival at El Polin

Logan Kahle
 

Hi all,

Taking a break from the filial piety of mothers day I decided to amble around the neighborhood for an hour from 5-6pm. I struck gold at El Polin where I saw a grosbeak flying away from the spring with a fat white rump...a Rose-breasted! I followed it and eventually got a nice view in the ponds near the entrance (on the north side) and was shocked to find it accompanied by a SECOND in the same bush!! Both were males. They both dropped down into the willows and very soon after I heard a grosbeak singing from the other side of the loop, near the western spring. I ran over and, sure enough, it was a RoseBeak! I don't think the two flew out in the short time (less than a minute) before I heard this bird (I was looking for them flying out), so that makes at very least two, likely THREE Rose-breasteds at El Polin! Got a few crummy iphone photos of them for documentation.

For reference, there seems to be a vagrant wave going on in the whole region right now. Aside from the multiple Hooded Warblers and other goodies in SF, there have been vagrants on the Farallons, many in the desert and SoCal, and even one in the Central Valley (!) in the past week or so.

Josiah mentioned a point about this wave with regards to the city that seems completely accurate from what I've seen...birds are showing up in the best quality habitat in the interior of the city. I was at Land's End this morning with Jonah Benningfield and, while it was quite active (half a dozen Swainson's Thrushes, etc), it was nothing in comparison to the dozens of thrushes and other migrants reported in Golden Gate Park elsewhere in the city in the past couple days. Even the Presidio, normally relatively poor for migrant concentrations, is pretty loaded right now. Active coverage of forested hills, Golden Gate Park, Lake Merced, and the Presidio might turn up some more goodies.

Its a crazy spring out there right now. Get out and BIRD!

Happy Mother's Day.

Good birding,

Logan


Re: Yellow breasted chat lobos creek

Max Benningfield
 

The Yellow-breasted chat is still singing at the 
Lobos creek overlook. 
Good birding, 
Max


On Sun, May 10, 2020 at 7:09 AM Josiah Clark <josiah.clark621@...> wrote:
Singing below the overlook among a chorus of Swainsons thrush and black headed grosbeaks

Josiah Clark | Habitat Potential | Consulting Ecologist | 415.317.3978
License #1043929


Re: Singing Hooded Warbler ay McLaren Lodge

Dario Taraborelli
 

Very accessible and singing loudly. Not hard to spot. Thanks for the tip, Joachim!

On May 10, 2020, at 09:11, Dario Taraborelli <dario.taraborelli@...> wrote:


Continuing at 9:10 at (37.7724991, -122.4573141)

On May 10, 2020, at 06:28, Joachim Gonzalez <gonzalexgaming21@...> wrote:


There is a singing Hooded Warbler at McLaren Lodge in Golden Gate Park

Good Birding,
Joachim Gonzalez


Re: Singing Hooded Warbler ay McLaren Lodge

Dario Taraborelli
 

Continuing at 9:10 at (37.7724991, -122.4573141)

On May 10, 2020, at 06:28, Joachim Gonzalez <gonzalexgaming21@...> wrote:


There is a singing Hooded Warbler at McLaren Lodge in Golden Gate Park

Good Birding,
Joachim Gonzalez


Hooded Warbler continues at McLaren Park

Kevin Liberg
 

Reported yesterday by Ben Dudek. It’s on west side on lower pond


Yellow breasted chat lobos creek

Josiah Clark
 

Singing below the overlook among a chorus of Swainsons thrush and black headed grosbeaks

Josiah Clark | Habitat Potential | Consulting Ecologist | 415.317.3978
License #1043929


Singing Hooded Warbler ay McLaren Lodge

Joachim Gonzalez
 

There is a singing Hooded Warbler at McLaren Lodge in Golden Gate Park

Good Birding,
Joachim Gonzalez