Date   

Re: Bristle-thighed Curlew

Mark Stephenson
 

Greetings Fellow Birders!
Since Pt Reyes is closed to vehicles at L Ranch, Lucas and I biked into Abbott’s Lagoon yesterday and searched for several hours for the BT Curlew, 1 or more miles North and South of the location where Matt photographed it without success. We did view 2 flocks of Whimbrels but it did not appear to be with them. The wind picked up in the late afternoon to make it tough work. We did see many Red-necked Phalaropes and a Purple Martin, along with a family of 5 River Otters to lift our spirits! The distance from L ranch to the Abbott’s Lagoon parking lot is approximately 2 miles with another mile to the beach. Good Luck if you have the chance to look again.
Happy Birding!
Mark & Lucas Stephenson 




On Wednesday, May 20, 2020, 10:27 AM, jim lomax <sdrib@...> wrote:

FYI

So that everyone has a notice and chance to look for one of these birds:

Be advised that yesterday a Snowy Plover researcher found this bird on a beach in Marin County. Due to the fact that the area is closed to the public it was not posted. I saw two in 1998, one in Marin and one in Del Norte both within a day of each other, thus, they can be here in multiples. So if you are out on the coast of California you may want to take a closer look at those Whimbrels. 1998 was the last time they were here.
Jim







Bristle-thighed Curlew

jim lomax
 

FYI

So that everyone has a notice and chance to look for one of these birds:

Be advised that yesterday a Snowy Plover researcher found this bird on a beach in Marin County. Due to the fact that the area is closed to the public it was not posted. I saw two in 1998, one in Marin and one in Del Norte both within a day of each other, thus, they can be here in multiples. So if you are out on the coast of California you may want to take a closer look at those Whimbrels. 1998 was the last time they were here.
Jim







White Breasted Nuthatch at a Fort Mason

David Assmann
 

In eucalyptus trees west of garden 


Swainson’s Hawk McLaren

Daniel Scali
 

Flew over the June Jordan school directly N bound at 9:16am

Good Hawking!
Dan


Re: Flying mystery - Anhinga

Brian Fitch
 

Here are a few findings from some simple on-line research over the past few hours.

Anhinga species (4 world wide), do not seem to be kept regularly in zoos, though there was one in recent years at San Diego's; it may still be there right now.  SF's zoo didn't have one the last time I was there a year ago.  The only SF record for Anhinga was from June 2nd until July 16th, 1939, at Lake Merced.  The CBRC has only one record of Darter, but I also found that the last accepted Anhinga record for the state was the bird that I and many others saw near the Salton Sea in the spring of 2004.  That surprises me, so perhaps I didn't find an updated list, not having spent much time in their database.  Regardless of species, this is an extremely unusual sighting.  No darters on eBird...

It seems to me that the biggest factor suggesting wild provenance, circumstantial though it is, is that we're having so many visitors from the southeastern quadrant of the continent, with the weekend's Mississippi Kite being the other mega, in addition to multiple warblers.  And today's bird showed up in the aftermath of a warm and unusually late storm.

However I end up treating this bird on my personal list, I want to thank Aaron for spotting it and sticking with it until I paid attention.  It's still out there somewhere, so watch the sky, and the surface of any murky non-salt water for a Snakebird's neck and beak.  Adjacent snags too.
Brian Fitch



On Mon, May 18, 2020 at 3:30 PM Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:
Just received word that escaped African Darters have been seen in the south state in the past.  I'll leave it to others to consider the likelihood of one making its way up here, or to discover whether it or some other darter species has escaped from a local zoo.  Today's bird was too far away to differentiate between the members of the darter family.
BF

On Mon, May 18, 2020 at 3:13 PM Brian Fitch via groups.io <fogeggs=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

Around 10:30 this morning, Aaron Maizlish and I were standing at the north end of the Fort Scott ball field discussing how to judge the odd weather in regards to where to search for birds.  The wind was sporadic in both speed and direction, and the clouds and humidity were abnormal.  Aaron then picked up on what he thought was a cormorant heading over, and I ignored it, as D-c Cormorants are regular flybys here.  But then he said it was soaring, and that maybe it was an ibis, so I tracked his sight line and spotted the bird.  It was very high, only a speck to the naked eye, it was well south of us, and backlit, but I immediately noted why he was thinking ibis, as the proportions were odd, too long in front and back for any cormorant species.

As it circled into full ventral outline, I fell into shocked silence as I saw that the aft portion of the body did not consist of the gangly legs of an ibis, but was a long fan-shaped tail with tight corners, like a Sharp-shinned, only much bigger.  I could pick up no color at that point, and I asked Aaron if he could try to get a photo on the next circle.  But that was a mistake, as while he was pulling his camera up, he lost sight of the bird, and it broke its kettling and took a line west-southwest toward Baker Beach and maybe Land's End.  I was able to track it as it continued in a long, slowly descending soar, and as it became less backlit, I finally saw some buffy coloring on the front portions.  I can't recall even a single flap of the wings, and did not give adequate attention to their proportions.  In profile it was very clear that the bird was elongated on both ends relative to cormorants, but again, it was distant enough to leave me room for doubt.  But I posted the sighting anyway in case anyone else was watching along its path.

When the bird did not reappear, I pulled out my Sibley and did a little research before writing the second message.  Aaron soon left, and I went over to the Sutro Baths, where only a single cormorant was swimming, and then headed down to the cormorant rookery at Lake Merced.  Only after seeing multiple D-c's fly over me did I feel ready to face the negative energy from the sceptosphere and head for home to write this up.  I also checked other cormorant hangouts around the lake with no further luck. 

Just for background, I have seen many Anhingas in their normal range, two at the Salton Sea years ago, and just this past January, when life was still normal, saw several Oriental Darters in India.  There is one previous record of Anhinga that I know of here in the city, but from very long ago (1930's?).  As always, I am open to respectfully put questions about anything I may have failed to include above.  And Aaron, if you have anything to add or a differing memory, let me know.

I had already been out for hours prior to this sighting, with no shorebirds at all on Ocean Beach (so much for Birdcast!), a single Brant during an early Sutro seawatch, and a few tanagers singing at Dragonfly Creek.  A mother and calf Gray Whale were also highlights on the first Sutro visit.
Brian Fitch


On Mon, May 18, 2020 at 10:59 AM Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:

I may be ruining what reputation I have , but I believe we just had an Anhinga soaring south of Ft Scott, quite distant, but showing the classic shape from beneath and then in profile as it broke its circle and flew in the general direction of Land’s End.
It was backlit but appeared to have the Buffy neck of a female.
First spotted by Aaron, but he’s not ready yet to confirm.
Lake Merced may be a good place to look, but the sky might be best.
Brian Fitch

On Mon, May 18, 2020 at 10:35 AM Brian Fitch via groups.io <fogeggs=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
A very strange flight profile just headed sw from ft scottt
Anhinga like soaring
Look up
Brian Fitch


Re: Flying mystery - Anhinga

Aaron Maizlish
 

I don’t have that much to add.

While we were chatting I saw a high dark bird gliding and thought I might have an Ibis.  When I got my bins on it, saw the cormorant-like yellow bill and mentioned to Brian that I had a cormorant soaring like a raptor.  The proportions seemed wrong and I definitely wanted him to get a good look.  For one thing it was soaring quite high and not flapping its wings, and making lazy circles. For another thing it seemed to have long-planked wings and a large fanned tail.   Brian said “I’m going to regret saying this, but it’s shaped like an Anhinga.”   Suddenly all of the proportions made sense to me, and since he was on the bird I reached for my camera.  I was never able to get it focused on the speck of black in the sky, and I never got another look.  If I had my better lens on the camera I would have gotten it.

I’m going to let it go.  Brian got a better read on the features than I did.  That’s may be the end of the story unless someone sees an Anhinga around here in the next couple of days.  All sorts of weird and wonderful things are passing over head right now, and you just need to look up at the right time, preferably with the right lens on your camera.

Aaron Maizlish
 

On May 18, 2020, at 3:13 PM, Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:


Around 10:30 this morning, Aaron Maizlish and I were standing at the north end of the Fort Scott ball field discussing how to judge the odd weather in regards to where to search for birds.  The wind was sporadic in both speed and direction, and the clouds and humidity were abnormal.  Aaron then picked up on what he thought was a cormorant heading over, and I ignored it, as D-c Cormorants are regular flybys here.  But then he said it was soaring, and that maybe it was an ibis, so I tracked his sight line and spotted the bird.  It was very high, only a speck to the naked eye, it was well south of us, and backlit, but I immediately noted why he was thinking ibis, as the proportions were odd, too long in front and back for any cormorant species.

As it circled into full ventral outline, I fell into shocked silence as I saw that the aft portion of the body did not consist of the gangly legs of an ibis, but was a long fan-shaped tail with tight corners, like a Sharp-shinned, only much bigger.  I could pick up no color at that point, and I asked Aaron if he could try to get a photo on the next circle.  But that was a mistake, as while he was pulling his camera up, he lost sight of the bird, and it broke its kettling and took a line west-southwest toward Baker Beach and maybe Land's End.  I was able to track it as it continued in a long, slowly descending soar, and as it became less backlit, I finally saw some buffy coloring on the front portions.  I can't recall even a single flap of the wings, and did not give adequate attention to their proportions.  In profile it was very clear that the bird was elongated on both ends relative to cormorants, but again, it was distant enough to leave me room for doubt.  But I posted the sighting anyway in case anyone else was watching along its path.

When the bird did not reappear, I pulled out my Sibley and did a little research before writing the second message.  Aaron soon left, and I went over to the Sutro Baths, where only a single cormorant was swimming, and then headed down to the cormorant rookery at Lake Merced.  Only after seeing multiple D-c's fly over me did I feel ready to face the negative energy from the sceptosphere and head for home to write this up.  I also checked other cormorant hangouts around the lake with no further luck. 

Just for background, I have seen many Anhingas in their normal range, two at the Salton Sea years ago, and just this past January, when life was still normal, saw several Oriental Darters in India.  There is one previous record of Anhinga that I know of here in the city, but from very long ago (1930's?).  As always, I am open to respectfully put questions about anything I may have failed to include above.  And Aaron, if you have anything to add or a differing memory, let me know.

I had already been out for hours prior to this sighting, with no shorebirds at all on Ocean Beach (so much for Birdcast!), a single Brant during an early Sutro seawatch, and a few tanagers singing at Dragonfly Creek.  A mother and calf Gray Whale were also highlights on the first Sutro visit.
Brian Fitch


On Mon, May 18, 2020 at 10:59 AM Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:

I may be ruining what reputation I have , but I believe we just had an Anhinga soaring south of Ft Scott, quite distant, but showing the classic shape from beneath and then in profile as it broke its circle and flew in the general direction of Land’s End.
It was backlit but appeared to have the Buffy neck of a female.
First spotted by Aaron, but he’s not ready yet to confirm.
Lake Merced may be a good place to look, but the sky might be best.
Brian Fitch

On Mon, May 18, 2020 at 10:35 AM Brian Fitch via groups.io <fogeggs=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
A very strange flight profile just headed sw from ft scottt
Anhinga like soaring
Look up
Brian Fitch




Re: Flying mystery - Anhinga

Brian Fitch
 

Just received word that escaped African Darters have been seen in the south state in the past.  I'll leave it to others to consider the likelihood of one making its way up here, or to discover whether it or some other darter species has escaped from a local zoo.  Today's bird was too far away to differentiate between the members of the darter family.
BF


On Mon, May 18, 2020 at 3:13 PM Brian Fitch via groups.io <fogeggs=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

Around 10:30 this morning, Aaron Maizlish and I were standing at the north end of the Fort Scott ball field discussing how to judge the odd weather in regards to where to search for birds.  The wind was sporadic in both speed and direction, and the clouds and humidity were abnormal.  Aaron then picked up on what he thought was a cormorant heading over, and I ignored it, as D-c Cormorants are regular flybys here.  But then he said it was soaring, and that maybe it was an ibis, so I tracked his sight line and spotted the bird.  It was very high, only a speck to the naked eye, it was well south of us, and backlit, but I immediately noted why he was thinking ibis, as the proportions were odd, too long in front and back for any cormorant species.

As it circled into full ventral outline, I fell into shocked silence as I saw that the aft portion of the body did not consist of the gangly legs of an ibis, but was a long fan-shaped tail with tight corners, like a Sharp-shinned, only much bigger.  I could pick up no color at that point, and I asked Aaron if he could try to get a photo on the next circle.  But that was a mistake, as while he was pulling his camera up, he lost sight of the bird, and it broke its kettling and took a line west-southwest toward Baker Beach and maybe Land's End.  I was able to track it as it continued in a long, slowly descending soar, and as it became less backlit, I finally saw some buffy coloring on the front portions.  I can't recall even a single flap of the wings, and did not give adequate attention to their proportions.  In profile it was very clear that the bird was elongated on both ends relative to cormorants, but again, it was distant enough to leave me room for doubt.  But I posted the sighting anyway in case anyone else was watching along its path.

When the bird did not reappear, I pulled out my Sibley and did a little research before writing the second message.  Aaron soon left, and I went over to the Sutro Baths, where only a single cormorant was swimming, and then headed down to the cormorant rookery at Lake Merced.  Only after seeing multiple D-c's fly over me did I feel ready to face the negative energy from the sceptosphere and head for home to write this up.  I also checked other cormorant hangouts around the lake with no further luck. 

Just for background, I have seen many Anhingas in their normal range, two at the Salton Sea years ago, and just this past January, when life was still normal, saw several Oriental Darters in India.  There is one previous record of Anhinga that I know of here in the city, but from very long ago (1930's?).  As always, I am open to respectfully put questions about anything I may have failed to include above.  And Aaron, if you have anything to add or a differing memory, let me know.

I had already been out for hours prior to this sighting, with no shorebirds at all on Ocean Beach (so much for Birdcast!), a single Brant during an early Sutro seawatch, and a few tanagers singing at Dragonfly Creek.  A mother and calf Gray Whale were also highlights on the first Sutro visit.
Brian Fitch


On Mon, May 18, 2020 at 10:59 AM Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:

I may be ruining what reputation I have , but I believe we just had an Anhinga soaring south of Ft Scott, quite distant, but showing the classic shape from beneath and then in profile as it broke its circle and flew in the general direction of Land’s End.
It was backlit but appeared to have the Buffy neck of a female.
First spotted by Aaron, but he’s not ready yet to confirm.
Lake Merced may be a good place to look, but the sky might be best.
Brian Fitch

On Mon, May 18, 2020 at 10:35 AM Brian Fitch via groups.io <fogeggs=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
A very strange flight profile just headed sw from ft scottt
Anhinga like soaring
Look up
Brian Fitch


Re: Flying mystery - Anhinga

Brian Fitch
 


Around 10:30 this morning, Aaron Maizlish and I were standing at the north end of the Fort Scott ball field discussing how to judge the odd weather in regards to where to search for birds.  The wind was sporadic in both speed and direction, and the clouds and humidity were abnormal.  Aaron then picked up on what he thought was a cormorant heading over, and I ignored it, as D-c Cormorants are regular flybys here.  But then he said it was soaring, and that maybe it was an ibis, so I tracked his sight line and spotted the bird.  It was very high, only a speck to the naked eye, it was well south of us, and backlit, but I immediately noted why he was thinking ibis, as the proportions were odd, too long in front and back for any cormorant species.

As it circled into full ventral outline, I fell into shocked silence as I saw that the aft portion of the body did not consist of the gangly legs of an ibis, but was a long fan-shaped tail with tight corners, like a Sharp-shinned, only much bigger.  I could pick up no color at that point, and I asked Aaron if he could try to get a photo on the next circle.  But that was a mistake, as while he was pulling his camera up, he lost sight of the bird, and it broke its kettling and took a line west-southwest toward Baker Beach and maybe Land's End.  I was able to track it as it continued in a long, slowly descending soar, and as it became less backlit, I finally saw some buffy coloring on the front portions.  I can't recall even a single flap of the wings, and did not give adequate attention to their proportions.  In profile it was very clear that the bird was elongated on both ends relative to cormorants, but again, it was distant enough to leave me room for doubt.  But I posted the sighting anyway in case anyone else was watching along its path.

When the bird did not reappear, I pulled out my Sibley and did a little research before writing the second message.  Aaron soon left, and I went over to the Sutro Baths, where only a single cormorant was swimming, and then headed down to the cormorant rookery at Lake Merced.  Only after seeing multiple D-c's fly over me did I feel ready to face the negative energy from the sceptosphere and head for home to write this up.  I also checked other cormorant hangouts around the lake with no further luck. 

Just for background, I have seen many Anhingas in their normal range, two at the Salton Sea years ago, and just this past January, when life was still normal, saw several Oriental Darters in India.  There is one previous record of Anhinga that I know of here in the city, but from very long ago (1930's?).  As always, I am open to respectfully put questions about anything I may have failed to include above.  And Aaron, if you have anything to add or a differing memory, let me know.

I had already been out for hours prior to this sighting, with no shorebirds at all on Ocean Beach (so much for Birdcast!), a single Brant during an early Sutro seawatch, and a few tanagers singing at Dragonfly Creek.  A mother and calf Gray Whale were also highlights on the first Sutro visit.
Brian Fitch


On Mon, May 18, 2020 at 10:59 AM Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:

I may be ruining what reputation I have , but I believe we just had an Anhinga soaring south of Ft Scott, quite distant, but showing the classic shape from beneath and then in profile as it broke its circle and flew in the general direction of Land’s End.
It was backlit but appeared to have the Buffy neck of a female.
First spotted by Aaron, but he’s not ready yet to confirm.
Lake Merced may be a good place to look, but the sky might be best.
Brian Fitch

On Mon, May 18, 2020 at 10:35 AM Brian Fitch via groups.io <fogeggs=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
A very strange flight profile just headed sw from ft scottt
Anhinga like soaring
Look up
Brian Fitch


Re: Flying mystery

Brian Fitch
 


I may be ruining what reputation I have , but I believe we just had an Anhinga soaring south of Ft Scott, quite distant, but showing the classic shape from beneath and then in profile as it broke its circle and flew in the general direction of Land’s End.
It was backlit but appeared to have the Buffy neck of a female.
First spotted by Aaron, but he’s not ready yet to confirm.
Lake Merced may be a good place to look, but the sky might be best.
Brian Fitch


On Mon, May 18, 2020 at 10:35 AM Brian Fitch via groups.io <fogeggs=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
A very strange flight profile just headed sw from ft scottt
Anhinga like soaring
Look up
Brian Fitch


Flying mystery

Brian Fitch
 

A very strange flight profile just headed sw from ft scottt
Anhinga like soaring
Look up
Brian Fitch


Re: El Polin Strange Call (Swainson's)

Linda Swanson
 

xeno-canto has this call of the Swainson’s Thrush recorded. Cat.nr.# XC355191 by Thomas Magarian, 6-16-2016 from Bowman Lake GNP, Flathead County, Montana, 25 seconds. Thomas Magarian has multiple Swainson’s Thrush calls and songs, and note this Cat.nr. XC355191

On May 17, 2020, at 9:07 PM, Richard Bradus via groups.io <grizzledjay@...> wrote:

Yup - it's a Swainson's Thrush, making its "Whit-burrr" (or Churr) call.

Thanks to Alvaro Jaramillo, John Sterling, Ralph and Josiah for their insights.

There was an interesting mix of opinions, ranging from Song Sparrow (which, after all, is also heard singing on the recording), to Bewick's Wren to a squirrel - but lest anyone scoff, Josiah wrote that he sometimes calls it the "squirrel call", which is an easy way to remember it.

While a bit embarrassed, as John noted that he pointed it out to me on Thursday at the same spot (I guess I missed it, intent on the Rose-breasted Grosbeak and trying to duck the rain), I shouldn't feel so bad as even a few more experienced birders were also unfamiliar with this call. Alvaro kindly sent some notes of the range of Swainson's calls with descriptions from the "Birds of the World" series, consisting of the "Whit-burrr that I heard, the "Peep", the familiar "Bink" or "plink" (what I refer to as the "water droplet" call), and the "Peeeeeer". Also noted that the "Churr" call may be more frequent late in the day, which certainly fits in this instance.

Still, the coarseness of this call amazes me, given the softness of the much more common "plink" calls and the upward spiraling, almost ethereal song of this species. I just have not had enough experience with all the variations - at least until this spring - it seems like there have been an unusual number of Swainson's arriving or migrating through our area. Maybe I just haven't gone in the past to the right areas at the right times, but certainly I've heard more Swainson's songs and calls in the past few days than in the past few years here in SF.

In any case, this particular bird's call is an interesting variation. I searched for some time through a couple of sources (still haven't checked Xenocanto though), and found very few examples. In particular, in the Macaulay Library there are plenty of recordings of Swainson's songs and the plink calls, a few of the peep and even the peeeer calls, but only a couple of this Whit-burrr - and those were somewhat different from the call I recorded. Therefore, I have submitted an eBird checklist (https://ebird.org/checklist/S69225813) and added the recording, so hopefully once the backlog of audio processing at eBird is resolved it will be available to all and preserved in the Macaulay archive.

Thanks again to all who responded. I learned something valuable. And, as there has certainly been an influx of interesting migrants in the past couple of weeks, it bears emphasis that all of us would be wise to follow any unusual songs and calls that we may encounter - it may turn out to be something special.

Richard Bradus
San Francisco
On Saturday, May 16, 2020, 09:27:31 PM PDT, Ralph McKinnon <mckinnon_ralph@...> wrote: 


I’m guessing it’s the churr call of a Swainson’s Thrush but am looking forward to seeing other opinions. 

Ralph McKinnon
SF




On Saturday, May 16, 2020, 8:40 PM, kim <leo811sf@...> wrote:

Will be interested in knowing what this is.  Sounds very similar to what I heard in my yard today.  

Kim
SF

Be Kind. Lady Karma is Always Watching.



On May 16, 2020, at 8:05 PM, "Richard Bradus via groups.io" <grizzledjay@...> wrote:


Hi all

Earlier this evening I made it down to El Polin and, in the company of Connor Cochrane, whiffed on grosbeaks though there were multiple Swainson's Thrush, Scrub Jays, Song Sparrows and a bunch of smaller birds. While listening to both calls and songs of Swainson's Thrushes there was a period of silence, then we heard this short, rather harsh call repeated from dense cover in the shrubs behind the famous elderberry. (Hopefully the .wav file will go with this message, either below or as an attachment).

We were stumped. Could this be a Swainson's??? Connor suggested maybe a Catbird, which is intriguing, but it doesn't sound like the catbird a few years ago in the Botanical Garden. Maybe a mad, feral catbird?

Anyway, any thoughts or, hopefully, a definitive ID would be very much appreciated.

Richard Bradus
San Francisco 




Re: El Polin Strange Call (Swainson's)

Richard Bradus
 

Yup - it's a Swainson's Thrush, making its "Whit-burrr" (or Churr) call.

Thanks to Alvaro Jaramillo, John Sterling, Ralph and Josiah for their insights.

There was an interesting mix of opinions, ranging from Song Sparrow (which, after all, is also heard singing on the recording), to Bewick's Wren to a squirrel - but lest anyone scoff, Josiah wrote that he sometimes calls it the "squirrel call", which is an easy way to remember it.

While a bit embarrassed, as John noted that he pointed it out to me on Thursday at the same spot (I guess I missed it, intent on the Rose-breasted Grosbeak and trying to duck the rain), I shouldn't feel so bad as even a few more experienced birders were also unfamiliar with this call. Alvaro kindly sent some notes of the range of Swainson's calls with descriptions from the "Birds of the World" series, consisting of the "Whit-burrr that I heard, the "Peep", the familiar "Bink" or "plink" (what I refer to as the "water droplet" call), and the "Peeeeeer". Also noted that the "Churr" call may be more frequent late in the day, which certainly fits in this instance.

Still, the coarseness of this call amazes me, given the softness of the much more common "plink" calls and the upward spiraling, almost ethereal song of this species. I just have not had enough experience with all the variations - at least until this spring - it seems like there have been an unusual number of Swainson's arriving or migrating through our area. Maybe I just haven't gone in the past to the right areas at the right times, but certainly I've heard more Swainson's songs and calls in the past few days than in the past few years here in SF.

In any case, this particular bird's call is an interesting variation. I searched for some time through a couple of sources (still haven't checked Xenocanto though), and found very few examples. In particular, in the Macaulay Library there are plenty of recordings of Swainson's songs and the plink calls, a few of the peep and even the peeeer calls, but only a couple of this Whit-burrr - and those were somewhat different from the call I recorded. Therefore, I have submitted an eBird checklist (https://ebird.org/checklist/S69225813) and added the recording, so hopefully once the backlog of audio processing at eBird is resolved it will be available to all and preserved in the Macaulay archive.

Thanks again to all who responded. I learned something valuable. And, as there has certainly been an influx of interesting migrants in the past couple of weeks, it bears emphasis that all of us would be wise to follow any unusual songs and calls that we may encounter - it may turn out to be something special.

Richard Bradus
San Francisco

On Saturday, May 16, 2020, 09:27:31 PM PDT, Ralph McKinnon <mckinnon_ralph@...> wrote:


I’m guessing it’s the churr call of a Swainson’s Thrush but am looking forward to seeing other opinions. 

Ralph McKinnon
SF




On Saturday, May 16, 2020, 8:40 PM, kim <leo811sf@...> wrote:

Will be interested in knowing what this is.  Sounds very similar to what I heard in my yard today. 

Kim
SF

Be Kind. Lady Karma is Always Watching.



On May 16, 2020, at 8:05 PM, "Richard Bradus via groups.io" <grizzledjay@...> wrote:


Hi all

Earlier this evening I made it down to El Polin and, in the company of Connor Cochrane, whiffed on grosbeaks though there were multiple Swainson's Thrush, Scrub Jays, Song Sparrows and a bunch of smaller birds. While listening to both calls and songs of Swainson's Thrushes there was a period of silence, then we heard this short, rather harsh call repeated from dense cover in the shrubs behind the famous elderberry. (Hopefully the .wav file will go with this message, either below or as an attachment).

We were stumped. Could this be a Swainson's??? Connor suggested maybe a Catbird, which is intriguing, but it doesn't sound like the catbird a few years ago in the Botanical Garden. Maybe a mad, feral catbird?

Anyway, any thoughts or, hopefully, a definitive ID would be very much appreciated.

Richard Bradus
San Francisco 



Pier 94, cont. Eurasian Wigeon, RN Phalarope

Eddie Bartley
 

Gorgeous morning for a brief visit to Pier 94. Lot's of butterfly and bee activity in the uplands. Surprised to see the continuing male EURASIAN WIGEON loafing in the Hanson "pond" which is quickly evaporating. A single RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, truly resplendent in fresh and bright plumage, feeding in the north pond. Only other shorebirds were Killdeer and a Spotted Sandpiper, no Avocet (which have not successfully fledged young in recent years).

The usual suspects are attempting to nest plus a less usual California Towhee pair, non-stop singing for a couple of weeks now. At least 2 NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS have been around for a couple of weeks now, they may be making a go of it, seem to be orienting in the aggregate area west of the reserve and hunting over the marsh. 

Eddie Bartley


Buena & Corona Migrants

Brian Fitch
 

Nothing to match the magnitude of yesterday's six (6!) rare species newly found in SF, but on our neighborhood walk this morning my wife and I saw or heard singles of Olive-sided Flycatcher, Ash-throated Flycatcher, Pacific-slope Flycatcher, Western Tanager, and Lazuli Bunting at Corona Heights, and Olive-sided Flycatcher, Western Wood-Pewee, Cassin's Vireo, Warbling Vireo, and a singing grosbeak species at Buena Vista.  There were a lot of resident species feeding newly fledged young in both parks.

Brian Fitch


Townsend’s Solitaire at Fort Mason

David Assmann
 

Landed in northeast corner of garden just as rain stopped- then flew East.


Re: El Polin Strange Call

nagra.ivs
 

Richard,
I believe Ralph has it correct that it is Swainson's Thrush.
Greg Budney


Re: El Polin Strange Call

Ralph McKinnon
 

I’m guessing it’s the churr call of a Swainson’s Thrush but am looking forward to seeing other opinions. 

Ralph McKinnon
SF




On Saturday, May 16, 2020, 8:40 PM, kim <leo811sf@...> wrote:

Will be interested in knowing what this is.  Sounds very similar to what I heard in my yard today. 

Kim
SF

Be Kind. Lady Karma is Always Watching.



On May 16, 2020, at 8:05 PM, "Richard Bradus via groups.io" <grizzledjay@...> wrote:


Hi all

Earlier this evening I made it down to El Polin and, in the company of Connor Cochrane, whiffed on grosbeaks though there were multiple Swainson's Thrush, Scrub Jays, Song Sparrows and a bunch of smaller birds. While listening to both calls and songs of Swainson's Thrushes there was a period of silence, then we heard this short, rather harsh call repeated from dense cover in the shrubs behind the famous elderberry. (Hopefully the .wav file will go with this message, either below or as an attachment).

We were stumped. Could this be a Swainson's??? Connor suggested maybe a Catbird, which is intriguing, but it doesn't sound like the catbird a few years ago in the Botanical Garden. Maybe a mad, feral catbird?

Anyway, any thoughts or, hopefully, a definitive ID would be very much appreciated.

Richard Bradus
San Francisco 



Re: El Polin Strange Call

kim
 

Will be interested in knowing what this is.  Sounds very similar to what I heard in my yard today. 

Kim
SF

Be Kind. Lady Karma is Always Watching.



On May 16, 2020, at 8:05 PM, "Richard Bradus via groups.io" <grizzledjay@...> wrote:


Hi all

Earlier this evening I made it down to El Polin and, in the company of Connor Cochrane, whiffed on grosbeaks though there were multiple Swainson's Thrush, Scrub Jays, Song Sparrows and a bunch of smaller birds. While listening to both calls and songs of Swainson's Thrushes there was a period of silence, then we heard this short, rather harsh call repeated from dense cover in the shrubs behind the famous elderberry. (Hopefully the .wav file will go with this message, either below or as an attachment).

We were stumped. Could this be a Swainson's??? Connor suggested maybe a Catbird, which is intriguing, but it doesn't sound like the catbird a few years ago in the Botanical Garden. Maybe a mad, feral catbird?

Anyway, any thoughts or, hopefully, a definitive ID would be very much appreciated.

Richard Bradus
San Francisco 



El Polin Strange Call

Richard Bradus
 

Hi all

Earlier this evening I made it down to El Polin and, in the company of Connor Cochrane, whiffed on grosbeaks though there were multiple Swainson's Thrush, Scrub Jays, Song Sparrows and a bunch of smaller birds. While listening to both calls and songs of Swainson's Thrushes there was a period of silence, then we heard this short, rather harsh call repeated from dense cover in the shrubs behind the famous elderberry. (Hopefully the .wav file will go with this message, either below or as an attachment).

We were stumped. Could this be a Swainson's??? Connor suggested maybe a Catbird, which is intriguing, but it doesn't sound like the catbird a few years ago in the Botanical Garden. Maybe a mad, feral catbird?

Anyway, any thoughts or, hopefully, a definitive ID would be very much appreciated.

Richard Bradus
San Francisco 



Lawrence’s Goldfinch - Jojoland Station

Joachim Gonzalez
 

A pair of Lawrence’s Goldfinches were seen 50 meters below the trees where the Yellow-throated Warbler was seen, in Phecalia plant. They soon left and circled north and where not refound. 

Good Birding,
Joachim Gonzalez