Date   
Re: McLaren Lodge Woodpeckers (No Yellow Shafted)

Joachim Gonzalez
 

Turns out the Yellow Shafted is an Intergrade. Tiny bit of red in the malar. Oops

Good Birding,
Joachim Gonzalez

On Fri, Jan 31, 2020 at 3:37 PM Joachim Gonzalez <gonzalexgaming21@...> wrote:
Ah rip. I’ll change that. 

On Fri, Jan 31, 2020 at 3:37 PM Rudyard Wallen <rudyardwallen@...> wrote:
Also, sorry to say, that perfect YS Flicker has difficult to detect red in the black malar. I reported it and need to go back and change it to intergrade :(

r



On Fri, Jan 31, 2020 at 3:33 PM Joachim Gonzalez <gonzalexgaming21@...> wrote:
The Woodpecker bonanza at McLaren lodge continues, with the continuing Red Naped Sapsucker, as well as both subspecies of Red Breasted, Ruber and Daggetti. A Yellow Shafted Flicker was also seen, plus the more common Downy and Hairy. 
7 species/subspecies of Woodpeckers here. Great fun. 

Good Birding,
Joschim Gonzalez

McLaren Lodge Woodpeckers

Joachim Gonzalez
 

The Woodpecker bonanza at McLaren lodge continues, with the continuing Red Naped Sapsucker, as well as both subspecies of Red Breasted, Ruber and Daggetti. A Yellow Shafted Flicker was also seen, plus the more common Downy and Hairy. 
7 species/subspecies of Woodpeckers here. Great fun. 

Good Birding,
Joschim Gonzalez

Western Flycatcher at Pine Lake this morning

Peter Pyle
 

Details and photos
<https://ebird.org/checklist/S63970929>https://ebird.org/checklist/S63970929

May be continuing? (It seems eBird alerts don't go out for "species pairs," even though this isn't one in my opinion.)

Re: 5 Skimmers continue at Crissy Field

Roberta Guise
 

Stunning! What a thrilling birdie treat. They have every nourishing reason to stick around for a while...


~ Roberta




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On Jan 30, 2020, at 7:52 PM, Mila Zinkova <Milazinkova@...> wrote:


5 Skimmers continue at Crissy Field

Mila Zinkova
 

"red-naped" sapsucker

Dominik Mosur
 


Peter, thank you for the clarification. Looking forward to any additional information about this bird.

Additionally I'd like to share this link :

This the daily updated homepage for bird sightings within San Francisco county as recorded in eBird.


Look under "recent visits" to see what's being reported.







On Jan 30, 2020, at 14:53, Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:

More specifically, the "Red-naped" Sapsucker (we'll have to check specimens to fully eliminate any Yellow-bellied Sapsucker genes, or at least try to) was present from about 1115 to noon in the large Eucalypti and Monterey Pines to the SW of the horseshoe pit area near the NE corner of Golden Gate Park (Stanyon and Fulton). To the south of the pit (and above the rock mural of the horseshoer) is a hill with two large Monterey Pines. Best to stand on this hill and look into the Eucalyptus to the east, and the pines on the hill. It has also been seen in the surrounding oaks in previous days.

We'll post photos soon on eBird.

Peter

At 02:36 PM 1/30/2020, Rudyard Wallen wrote:
Yes, where it was initially reported. So far has now been seen in the areas adjacent to the N, SE, S, SW of the horseshoe pits.  -r

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:31 PM Adam Winer <<mailto:awiner@...>awiner@...> wrote:
 I'm guessing this is the horseshoe pit in NE Golden Gate Park, but that's a guess.

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:29 PM Rudyard Wallen <<mailto:arelist12@...>arelist12@...> wrote:
Sorry, was shooting and tracking bird while typing (hence the auto-correct). Three birders showed up so I guess it was useful to someone? More later but after work.   -Rudy, SF

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:25 PM <<mailto:rosemary@...>rosemary@...> wrote:
What use is this to anyone  … where or what is h.p?


On Jan 30, 2020, at 11:20 AM, Rudyard Wallen <<mailto:arelist12@...>arelist12@...> wrote:

just south of the h.s. Pit

via Cher Ami







Re: red-napped ss in view

rosemary@...
 

Thank you so much, Dominik and Peter, for such clarity.  

I’m a neophyte over here in the East Bay and have little to no experience of places within Golden Gate Park, the Botanical Gardens, The Presidio, Chrissy Fields and many of the other places that San Francisco's seasoned birders talk about, so abbreviations are most often a mystery to me.

Rosemary



On Jan 30, 2020, at 2:30 PM, Dominik Mosur via Groups.Io <polskatata@...> wrote:

Hi Rosemary,

The OP (original poster) Rudyard Wallen, was referring to the horseshoe pits (HP).

This is the continuing thread on the presence of an interesting very likely RED-NAPED Sapsucker which has been observed in east end of Golden Gate Park between McLaren Lodge and the horseshoe pits . First reported as a sapsucker sp. by Brian Turner around 1/10.

If you go back in the archive of the list you should see the related messages.

Hope this helps,

Dominik Mosur 


On Jan 30, 2020, at 2:53 PM, Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:

More specifically, the "Red-naped" Sapsucker (we'll have to check specimens to fully eliminate any Yellow-bellied Sapsucker genes, or at least try to) was present from about 1115 to noon in the large Eucalypti and Monterey Pines to the SW of the horseshoe pit area near the NE corner of Golden Gate Park (Stanyon and Fulton). To the south of the pit (and above the rock mural of the horseshoer) is a hill with two large Monterey Pines. Best to stand on this hill and look into the Eucalyptus to the east, and the pines on the hill. It has also been seen in the surrounding oaks in previous days.

We'll post photos soon on eBird.

Peter

At 02:36 PM 1/30/2020, Rudyard Wallen wrote:
Yes, where it was initially reported. So far has now been seen in the areas adjacent to the N, SE, S, SW of the horseshoe pits.  -r

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:31 PM Adam Winer <<mailto:awiner@...>awiner@...> wrote:
 I'm guessing this is the horseshoe pit in NE Golden Gate Park, but that's a guess.

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:29 PM Rudyard Wallen <<mailto:arelist12@...>arelist12@...> wrote:
Sorry, was shooting and tracking bird while typing (hence the auto-correct). Three birders showed up so I guess it was useful to someone? More later but after work.   -Rudy, SF

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:25 PM <<mailto:rosemary@...>rosemary@...> wrote:
What use is this to anyone  
where or what is h.p?


On Jan 30, 2020, at 11:20 AM, Rudyard Wallen <<mailto:arelist12@...>arelist12@...> wrote:

just south of the h.s. Pit

via Cher Ami







Re: red-napped ss in view

Peter Pyle
 

More specifically, the "Red-naped" Sapsucker (we'll have to check specimens to fully eliminate any Yellow-bellied Sapsucker genes, or at least try to) was present from about 1115 to noon in the large Eucalypti and Monterey Pines to the SW of the horseshoe pit area near the NE corner of Golden Gate Park (Stanyon and Fulton). To the south of the pit (and above the rock mural of the horseshoer) is a hill with two large Monterey Pines. Best to stand on this hill and look into the Eucalyptus to the east, and the pines on the hill. It has also been seen in the surrounding oaks in previous days.

We'll post photos soon on eBird.

Peter

At 02:36 PM 1/30/2020, Rudyard Wallen wrote:
Yes, where it was initially reported. So far has now been seen in the areas adjacent to the N, SE, S, SW of the horseshoe pits. -r

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:31 PM Adam Winer <<mailto:awiner@...>awiner@...> wrote:
 I'm guessing this is the horseshoe pit in NE Golden Gate Park, but that's a guess.

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:29 PM Rudyard Wallen <<mailto:arelist12@...>arelist12@...> wrote:
Sorry, was shooting and tracking bird while typing (hence the auto-correct). Three birders showed up so I guess it was useful to someone? More later but after work.  -Rudy, SF

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:25 PM <<mailto:rosemary@...>rosemary@...> wrote:
What use is this to anyone  … where or what is h.p?


On Jan 30, 2020, at 11:20 AM, Rudyard Wallen <<mailto:arelist12@...>arelist12@...> wrote:

just south of the h.s. Pit

via Cher Ami

Re: red-napped ss in view

Rudyard Wallen
 

Yes, where it was initially reported. So far has now been seen in the areas adjacent to the N, SE, S, SW of the horseshoe pits.  -r


On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:31 PM Adam Winer <awiner@...> wrote:
 I'm guessing this is the horseshoe pit in NE Golden Gate Park, but that's a guess.

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:29 PM Rudyard Wallen <arelist12@...> wrote:
Sorry, was shooting and tracking bird while typing (hence the auto-correct). Three birders showed up so I guess it was useful to someone? More later but after work.   -Rudy, SF

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:25 PM <rosemary@...> wrote:
What use is this to anyone  … where or what is h.p?


On Jan 30, 2020, at 11:20 AM, Rudyard Wallen <arelist12@...> wrote:

just south of the h.s. Pit

via Cher Ami


Re: red-napped ss in view

Joachim Gonzalez
 

Yeah, sounds like Rudy is referring to the Horseshoe Pits where the Red Naped Sapsucker was first found. 

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:31 PM Adam Winer <awiner@...> wrote:
 I'm guessing this is the horseshoe pit in NE Golden Gate Park, but that's a guess.

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:29 PM Rudyard Wallen <arelist12@...> wrote:
Sorry, was shooting and tracking bird while typing (hence the auto-correct). Three birders showed up so I guess it was useful to someone? More later but after work.   -Rudy, SF

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:25 PM <rosemary@...> wrote:
What use is this to anyone  … where or what is h.p?


On Jan 30, 2020, at 11:20 AM, Rudyard Wallen <arelist12@...> wrote:

just south of the h.s. Pit

via Cher Ami


Re: red-napped ss in view

Dominik Mosur
 

Hi Rosemary,

The OP (original poster) Rudyard Wallen, was referring to the horseshoe pits (HP).

This is the continuing thread on the presence of an interesting very likely RED-NAPED Sapsucker which has been observed in east end of Golden Gate Park between McLaren Lodge and the horseshoe pits . First reported as a sapsucker sp. by Brian Turner around 1/10.

If you go back in the archive of the list you should see the related messages.

Hope this helps,

Dominik Mosur 


On Jan 30, 2020, at 13:54, rosemary@... wrote:

What use is this to anyone  … where or what is h.p?


On Jan 30, 2020, at 11:20 AM, Rudyard Wallen <arelist12@...> wrote:

just south of the h.s. Pit

via Cher Ami


Re: red-napped ss in view

Adam Winer
 

 I'm guessing this is the horseshoe pit in NE Golden Gate Park, but that's a guess.


On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:29 PM Rudyard Wallen <arelist12@...> wrote:
Sorry, was shooting and tracking bird while typing (hence the auto-correct). Three birders showed up so I guess it was useful to someone? More later but after work.   -Rudy, SF

On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:25 PM <rosemary@...> wrote:
What use is this to anyone  … where or what is h.p?


On Jan 30, 2020, at 11:20 AM, Rudyard Wallen <arelist12@...> wrote:

just south of the h.s. Pit

via Cher Ami


Re: red-napped ss in view

Rudyard Wallen
 

Sorry, was shooting and tracking bird while typing (hence the auto-correct). Three birders showed up so I guess it was useful to someone? More later but after work.   -Rudy, SF


On Thu, Jan 30, 2020 at 2:25 PM <rosemary@...> wrote:
What use is this to anyone  … where or what is h.p?


On Jan 30, 2020, at 11:20 AM, Rudyard Wallen <arelist12@...> wrote:

just south of the h.s. Pit

via Cher Ami


Re: red-napped ss in view

rosemary@...
 

What use is this to anyone  … where or what is h.p?


On Jan 30, 2020, at 11:20 AM, Rudyard Wallen <arelist12@...> wrote:

just south of the h.s. Pit

via Cher Ami


red-napped ss in view

Rudyard Wallen
 

just south of the h.s. Pit

via Cher Ami

Black skimmer skimming video

Mila Zinkova
 

Tonight at around 5 p.m. they were skimming.
https://youtu.be/F1ABs4scg9Q
Mila.

Re: Bird ID please

Mila Zinkova
 

The video was taken at Crissy Field lagoon a week ago.
I did not turn the comments off, YouTube does it because of
it’s new policy to protect minors.
Thank you everybody for the response!
Mila.

On Jan 29, 2020, at 7:29 AM, Mila Zinkova via Groups.Io <Milazinkova=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hello,
What is this bird?
https://youtu.be/nJut3pO_HFg
Thank you!


Bird ID please

Mila Zinkova
 

Hello,
What is this bird?
https://youtu.be/nJut3pO_HFg
Thank you!

Black Skimmers at Crissy Field Lagoon

Jesse Casman
 

Yesterday (Mon, Jan 27) and today (Tues, Jan 28) at dusk both days around 5pm - 5:30pm, was able to observe 1 Black Skimmer doing a lot of... skimming, back and forth across the lagoon, over and over, for 20+ minutes, with 3 companions standing on the sandbar near the north side not far East past the pedestrian bridge. Clear view of large lower orange and black mandible. Long wings, black on top of head with white throat and underside, black tail. 6-8 gulls standing nearby.

Re: Learn more about eBird and (we all) win something

Siobhan Ruck
 

I don’t disagree with greater use of eBird - the data it’s gathering is great.  

That said, I hope people continue to use lists like SFBirds for getting the word out about uncommon birds in our area.  Much easier to get word out quickly via the lists.


Siobhan


On Jan 27, 2020, at 5:08 PM, Richard Bradus via Groups.Io <grizzledjay@...> wrote:

Apologies if this is deemed "off-topic" - hopefully it will be of value.

Just wanted to alert all of you - before the month is up - that eBird's challenge of the month is to submit a checklist and then complete their "eBird Essentials" course online, which gives you a chance to win a pair of choice binoculars. See https://ebird.org/news/january-ebirder-of-the-month-challenge-2020

While many of you have been using eBird for some time, there are still some pointers that you may discover (or re-learn) by going through the course (it's pretty quick). And for those of you that are new to eBird or have not yet started it's a great way to jump in. In particular, you will learn some of the better practices for entering your data so that the information you provide will have scientific value - it's not just about the numbers! And, hopefully, we can all learn to use the platform more wisely and reduce unnecessary errors.

In particular, a couple of errors that are seen far too frequently:
1) Overstating the distance traveled. 
For those using the "Traveling" protocol to enter their observations (i.e. just about everyone), please note that the distance to be entered is a one-way distance. While birdwatching it is typical to go out and back on a particular trail or route, or to wander all over, but then the distance recorded (particularly if using the mobile app) will be incorrect, often markedly overstated. Please pay some attention to this, and correct the distance, especially if using the automatic recording feature on the mobile app.

2) Mis-use of the "Incidental" protocol.
Yeah, we know what it sounds like, but "Incidental" is actually a very specific - and the least useful scientifically - of all the data entry protocols. It is to be used only when you are doing something else and see something notable, for example when you are driving to work and you happen to spot a hawk perched at the side of the road. Here is a good example: https://ebird.org/checklist/S63424323 (thanks Dominik!). If are out somewhere, even if you are without binoculars, and you stop to study a bird or note the birds that are around, this is no longer an incidental observation; if you list 7 species, it's not incidental! Please use "Traveling" "Stationary" or other protocol and indicate "incomplete" if you were not keeping track of all the birds you saw or heard.

And, since the Essentials course is just a start, please explore the other features on the eBird data entry portal and elsewhere on their site. One thing you may want to do is to use the "Area" protocol (inexplicably buried under "Other" in the main checklist entry page) - it is the best protocol to use for many of our trips in our local parks, where we are not traveling along a trail or set path but rather observing from throughout the park, such as at Lafayette Park (a frequent hangout of mine) or the Lily Pond, where our observations are in a well-defined area. SF Rec & Park website lists the area of many of the parks under the specific park's description. Plus if one uses the Hotspot map, there is a distance scale at the bottom; not only is this very useful for submitting accurate distances, when using meters it is very easy to calculate areas as well (100 meters square is a hectare). And, really people, it's the 21st century - we should all be using meters and kilometers and hectares!

These are just a few issues and pointers. Please avail yourself of the contest, learn a bit more about eBird, and hopefully take some time to explore the site - especially check out the Explore section, you will be amazed with all the information that one can access. And it's all up to us to share and enter our observations so that all the data can be made available to advance the science and for our education and enjoyment.

And please review your checklists after you are done submitting, and and comments!! 

Many thanks also to Dominik Mosur, our tireless eBird reviewer.

Thank you all!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco