Date   

Gg hooded warbler

Teale Fristoe
 

Juan's hooded warbler continues this morning in the southeast corner of the gg golf course. Still singing regularly and giving occasional views.

Miss you all and safe public transportation,
Teale Fristoe
Berkeley


American Redstart at Mountain Lake continuing

David Assmann
 

In same spot found by Daniel Scali


Re: Mystery song

Eddie Monson
 

Hi everybody,
Thank you all so much for your opinions. It seems to me that the best guess and what it almost certainly is, is a Bewick's Wren. I've sure never heard that variation of song before and just thought it was weird considering the initial similarity from Blue-winged Warbler. It seems like the closer you look the farther off it seems for Blue Winged. Even though it's not a Blue-winged I always appreciate an opportunity to learn about birds!
Good Birding
Eddie

On Wed, Jun 24, 2020 at 6:00 AM Daniel Scali <daniel.s.scali@...> wrote:
McLaren IS the Bewick’s capital of SF in my unscientific opinion so that’s not a bad theory. How about a weird Junco? Hope it’s found and turned into gold!

I’ll ask Denise Wight for her opinion.

Good alchemy,
Dan


Re: Mystery song

Daniel Scali
 

McLaren IS the Bewick’s capital of SF in my unscientific opinion so that’s not a bad theory. How about a weird Junco? Hope it’s found and turned into gold!

I’ll ask Denise Wight for her opinion.

Good alchemy,
Dan


Re: Mystery song

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Hi Eddie

  It may be an odd Spotted Towhee, they do give two part songs around here sometimes. The frequency is too low for Blue-winged, and the structure of the trills is also not quite right. Blue-winged has a wider frequency range.

   You may want to download the free Raven software from Cornell and start fiddling around with making spectrograms. Those really help in making comparisons like this. You can then download comparative voices from xeno-canto…and you are off to the races.

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: SFBirds@groups.io <SFBirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Eddie Monson
Sent: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 7:24 PM
To: sfbirds@groups.io
Subject: [SFBirds] Mystery song

 

Hi all,

I heard a bird at the north side of Mclaren Park which puzzled me. It seems very interesting to me and other people I have sent it around too. I really would appreciate further insight no matter what the bird turns out to be. The location is undisclosed because it is private.

Good Birding 

Eddie M


Re: Mystery song

Mark Stephenson
 

Bewick’s Wrens have so many varied songs but this bird sounds uncannily similar to a Blue-Winged Warbler song. The only part that sounded a little off was that the ending trill was a little loose to my ear but this also can be a bit variable. We’re curious if anyone that has a Bewick’s Wren recording like this and could pass it on. We have heard many weird Bewick’s Wrens just never one like this. Would be awesome to hear a recording of one like this. 
Happy Birding,
Mark Stephenson




On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 9:01 PM, Frank Fogarty <fogartyfa@...> wrote:

Sounds like a Bewick’s Wren. They do a lot of odd stuff, but the loud nasally intro notes and buzzy trills are good features to listen for.

Frank Fogarty
Arcata 

On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 8:38 PM Mark Stephenson via groups.io <markstephenson4106=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
We listened to the recording and Immediately thought it was a Blue-Winged Warbler, although the trills a little loose this still falls well within the Blue-Winged category. This is a very rare bird and hope it stays for people to get visuals tomorrow morning. 
Cheers,
Mark&Lucas Stephenson 




On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 8:24 PM, Eddie Monson <eg40monson@...> wrote:

Hi all,
I heard a bird at the north side of Mclaren Park which puzzled me. It seems very interesting to me and other people I have sent it around too. I really would appreciate further insight no matter what the bird turns out to be. The location is undisclosed because it is private.
Good Birding 
Eddie M


Re: Mystery song

Frank Fogarty
 

Sounds like a Bewick’s Wren. They do a lot of odd stuff, but the loud nasally intro notes and buzzy trills are good features to listen for.

Frank Fogarty
Arcata 

On Tue, Jun 23, 2020 at 8:38 PM Mark Stephenson via groups.io <markstephenson4106=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
We listened to the recording and Immediately thought it was a Blue-Winged Warbler, although the trills a little loose this still falls well within the Blue-Winged category. This is a very rare bird and hope it stays for people to get visuals tomorrow morning. 
Cheers,
Mark&Lucas Stephenson 




On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 8:24 PM, Eddie Monson <eg40monson@...> wrote:

Hi all,
I heard a bird at the north side of Mclaren Park which puzzled me. It seems very interesting to me and other people I have sent it around too. I really would appreciate further insight no matter what the bird turns out to be. The location is undisclosed because it is private.
Good Birding 
Eddie M


Re: Mystery song

Mark Stephenson
 

We listened to the recording and Immediately thought it was a Blue-Winged Warbler, although the trills a little loose this still falls well within the Blue-Winged category. This is a very rare bird and hope it stays for people to get visuals tomorrow morning. 
Cheers,
Mark&Lucas Stephenson 




On Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 8:24 PM, Eddie Monson <eg40monson@...> wrote:

Hi all,
I heard a bird at the north side of Mclaren Park which puzzled me. It seems very interesting to me and other people I have sent it around too. I really would appreciate further insight no matter what the bird turns out to be. The location is undisclosed because it is private.
Good Birding 
Eddie M


Mystery song

Eddie Monson
 

Hi all,
I heard a bird at the north side of Mclaren Park which puzzled me. It seems very interesting to me and other people I have sent it around too. I really would appreciate further insight no matter what the bird turns out to be. The location is undisclosed because it is private.
Good Birding 
Eddie M


Re: American Redstart - Mtn Lake

Daniel Scali
 

Yup! Thanks to Dave and Max B for refinding. Still singing persistently as of 2:30pm. Same willow patch. Also Max and I glimpsed a mystery flycatcher with 2 buffy wing bars, pumping tail, and a pretty thin eye ring before it absconded. Best guesses are Willow Fly and juve PSlope.

Dan


Re: American Redstart - Mtn Lake

David Webster
 

Continuing Redstart in the same spot that Daniel Scali first reported.

On Mon, Jun 22, 2020 at 4:44 PM Daniel Scali <daniel.s.scali@...> wrote:
Hi,

SY male (unless females sing?) working the riparian 100-200 yds south of the restored meadow north of the lake. This is also along the path heading east and then south from the freeway underpass. GPS in ebird. The bird disappeared on me for about 20 min and then I heard it (and saw it) again. Currently still here 1 hour from when it first announced itself behind my head. Based on the speed and evenness of the series, I actually thought I was going to turn around to a Junco. What LUCK!

Happy Summer,
Dan Scali


Re: Hooded Warbler June 23: Noon update

Ken Moy
 

Striking male Hooded Warbler continues singing and displaying in eucs and short trees and shrubs. Has been near golf course in area between the 2nd coyote alert sign and about 30-40 yards East.


On Tue, Jun 23, 2020, 6:37 AM Dave Weber <dwbirdster@...> wrote:

Hooded Warbler continues this morning in GGP. From second Coyote sign west of North Lake restroom on JFK take trail from sidewalk to golf course edge. Bird heard and seen in this area from 6:10 to 6:25.

Dave Weber,
Milpitas
By phone


American Redstart at the SFBG 6/22 and 6/23

Nancy Palmer
 

Hi all,
I tried to send this post out last night but it didn’t go through so sending now along with an update. Went back to SFBG today with Ken Moy and he spotted the redstart in a group of chickadees up in one of the very tall yellowish trees off of zellerbach lawn right next to the New Zealand garden around 10am. I was able to get eyes on it as well and it looked like the same bird that I saw yesterday(see description below). It then flew off and we followed the chickadees through the NZ garden hoping that it was traveling with them but were unable to relocate it. Still no good photos. :(..

Happy Birding!
Nancy Palmer


From yesterday, 6/22/20:


Sorry for the very late post. On a trip to the SFBG this morning around 9:30am, I had what looked like an American Redstart in the moon viewing garden. It flew onto a flat rock next to the pond on the side closest to the maintenance shed. My first impression without bins and in low light was that it was a gray bird fanning a long tail with a light colored stripe and it was slightly larger than the chickadees dipping into the water next to it. With binoculars, I saw that it had an all gray head and a white chest with very bright yellow patches on the sides of its chest. I did not notice any streaking/mottling on the chest and it was silent the whole time. It quickly flew up to the magnolia tree with the chickadees and disappeared above the canopy. No photos unfortunately. :(..

Interesting day out there! Good birding to all. :)

Best,
Nancy Palmer
SF


Re: American Redstart @ BG

Ken Moy
 

Found in chicadee flock


On Tue, Jun 23, 2020, 9:54 AM Ken Moy via groups.io <ken.moy62=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
At south end of the lawn from Zellerbach Garden in Botanical Garden @ GGP: female type


American Redstart @ BG

Ken Moy
 

At south end of the lawn from Zellerbach Garden in Botanical Garden @ GGP: female type


Breeding Swainson’s Thrushes in SF? A challenge...

Josiah Clark
 

There are still Swainsons thrushes singing at several locations in San Francisco into summer! The last time this happened was long enough ago that most SF birders would not realize this used to be a thing that happened. 
Some locations from this year  include Mountain Lake Park, upper Lobos Creek, Washington Blvd in the presidio and  Mount Sutro. 
    It would be great to confirm breeding of this species for the city. A bird that is in decline in many areas and has a relatively specialized habitat type along the coast. There is no question in my mind that habitat restoration in riparian areas that encourages plants like red elderberry has had a huge positive impact on this frugivorous species.

Josiah Clark | Habitat Potential | Consulting Ecologist | 415.317.3978
License #1043929


Hooded Warbler June 23

Dave Weber
 


Hooded Warbler continues this morning in GGP. From second Coyote sign west of North Lake restroom on JFK take trail from sidewalk to golf course edge. Bird heard and seen in this area from 6:10 to 6:25.

Dave Weber,
Milpitas
By phone


Olive-sided flycatcher is back at Sutro Rotary Meadow

Bob Hall
 

I was glad to hear the repeated signing of the bird. Also still singing up there was an orange-crowned warbler. Is it getting late for it to still be singing in the city? I thought they were uncommon breeders here.
--
Bob Hall
San Francisco, CA
"There is no better high than discovery." - E.O. Wilson


Shearwater Spectacle Continues

Richard Bradus
 

Finally confronting my disdain of the coastal fog and wind, I made it out to Ocean Beach this evening (Monday June 22) and was able to witness the amazing spectacle reported by others over the past few days of masses of Sooty Shearwaters over the relatively nearshore waters. 

Heralded by phalanxes of pelicans soaring offshore and beginning to dive, the shearwaters began arriving about 6:30pm, flowing up from the south out of the fog and light drizzle off the coast, becoming a steady stream of eventually thousands. Initially circling back and then swirling around, they later settled into patterns of multiple rafts and smaller streams, fluctuating north to the Cliff House rocks and then south again, accompanied by what I estimated to be a couple of hundred pelicans and many scores of mostly Western as well as California gulls, and punctuated by fly-by groups of mostly Brant's cormorants plus a few assorted other species. 

I eventually made my way to the Cliff House and, fortunately, as the mists began, some of the shearwaters turned back and began streaming south again, a bit closer to shore so that I was able to actually see details with binoculars (no scope). Not being very well versed in ocean birds, I was unable to identify all of what was passing by and I saw no rarities, but there was at least one Humpback whale and a nice close-in cameo by a sea lion.

If you can stand the lousy weather conditions, by all means go out and see this spectacle, hopefully repeating again tomorrow evening. Lots and lots and lots of birds! We may have been born more than a century too late to have witnessed the great flocks of waterbirds in the long vanished wetlands of the Central Valley, but this is something to cherish.

Richard Bradus
San Francisco


American Redstart - Mtn Lake

Daniel Scali
 

Hi,

SY male (unless females sing?) working the riparian 100-200 yds south of the restored meadow north of the lake. This is also along the path heading east and then south from the freeway underpass. GPS in ebird. The bird disappeared on me for about 20 min and then I heard it (and saw it) again. Currently still here 1 hour from when it first announced itself behind my head. Based on the speed and evenness of the series, I actually thought I was going to turn around to a Junco. What LUCK!

Happy Summer,
Dan Scali