Date   

Mt. D

fogeggs
 

Mt Davidson had some activity this morning, pretty much the basic recent crew
of tanager, grosbeak and bunting. The only new character up there was
another Ash-throated Flycatcher, in the eucs northeast of the ravine around
8:15, and 15 minutes later up in eucs at the top of the ravine.
A late report from Friday; found 2 W Kingbirds and 5 late White-winged
Scoters at Candlestick.
Brian


Tuesday

Harry Fuller <harry_fuller@...>
 

Nothing unusual at Cliff House this AM...now 59 visible Br Cormorant nests on
rock #2
BLOY are nesting on rock #1 (counting from left), the one nearest the
shore...two dark, speckled eggs visible at thier nest site
At least 20 juvie Heermann's Gulls on the rocks and Sutro Baths seawall
over 30 sea lions feeding in surf beyond rocks, apparently sharing fish
breakfast with cormorants...a decade ago this would not have been worth noting

At Pacheco/Ocean Beach, a few lingering shorebirds: Sandelring (<10), Willet,
Whimbrel and Godwit
A sadly ailing Clark's Grebe on the beach there as well

Very quiet at East Wash around 8am, though OS Fly still calling regularly


Mt. Davidson, 05/24/00 (7:00-8:25 AM)

Paul Saraceni <Paul.Saraceni@...>
 

Observations of local interest:

Band-tailed Pigeon 11
Olive-sided Flycatcher 1
Western Wood-Pewee 3
HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER 1 -- continues on the north-facing hillside at the
bottom of the Ravine trail (present since 5/12)
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 1

Warbling Vireo 3
Swainson's Thrush 2
Warblers:
Yellow 2
Wilson's 4
Western Tanager 1
Black-headed Grosbeak 5
Lazuli Bunting 3 m.
Lesser Goldfinch 5

Paul Saraceni
paul.saraceni@...


swifts at City College

James Armstrong <jarmstro@...>
 

On Monday morning (around 8:30) I had a group of around half-a-dozen all-dark swifts circling and chattering over the science building at City College.  I'm not good with swifts if they aren't white-throats (I've seen black swifts once, in Colorado), but these ones seemed at least as large as white-throats and somewhat slower-moving (at least on swift terms!).  I didn't have binocs with me and the birds were at treetop level, so "all-dark" about all I can say about them.  I'd love to call them blacks, but they'll just have to go as "dark swift sp" in my book....
 
Whatever they were, they departed to parts unknown within a minute or so of my arrival.
 
Jim Armstrong
 
P.S. Many thanks to those of you who gave me directions and advice about the "washes"!


Windy morning

fogeggs
 

There was a lot of activity at the Cliff house this morning in the high
winds. It was fun to watch, but was pretty much the usual crew, with the
exception of a couple of handfuls of Sooty Shearwaters between 6:15 and 6:45.
A few of them approached quite near the shore, just behind the rocks.
Heermann's are back in force, some Pac Loons in alt plumage, and beyond my
scope's ID range, some smaller Forster's-type terns heading north.
Brian


Re: Morning birds

GASSTATION@...
 

This morning, after checking a fogged in and windy East Waah, I ran into
Brian Fitch at the Cliff House. There were the usual species present, but I
spotted a Parasitic Jaeger, reasonablly near shore and got Brian on it. A
very nice adult bird. There were some good Sooty Shearwaters in the flocks
well off shore, and lots of Murres on the move. After Brain went to work I
decided on a whim to check out Ft. Miley, seeing as how the fog was lifting.
I parked (illegally) at the VA Hospital and walked in. Immedialy I heard an
unfamiliar warbler song. I tracked the bird up on to Battery James Chester,
where I eventually found the male MAGNOLIA WARBLER foraging and singing in
the pines and cypresses west of the batterey. The bird was very difficult to
see, as it spent most of the time high up in the trees, but sang almost
constantly, and was easy to keep track of. I rechecked the washes and they
were quiet

Kevin McKereghan
Gasstation@...


Fri AM

rferrick@...
 

I checked the East Wash, North Lake, and Middle Lake this morning (6:45-8:15) finding nothing of note. 2 Olive-Sided Flycathchers continue in the East Wash. Wilson's Warblers at Middle and North Lake.

Picked up Kevin's Birdbox message around 10:20 AM and headed over to Fort Miley and heard/saw the Magnolia Warbler(10:45AM). An aggressive Anna's Hummingbird flushed the Magnolia once, allowing me a few seconds of nice views. I had the bird just west of the NW corner of the VA parking lot behind the hospital, between the parking lot and all the Battery structures. There is a fence there that has a "Lot 16" sign and there is a cat-feeding station in the grass along that fence as well (north). The song led me in from a good distance away and when seen it was below the conifer canopy in the bushes with the small white flowers (sp?) Nice one, Kevin.

One other note, last evening at 7PM, at the north end of Lake Merced, an Osprey was perched on the telephone pole in the NW corner dining on a large fish.

Rich


Stow Lake, yesterday evening

David Armstrong
 

There wasn't anything very unusual there last night,
but we did observe the heron nest on the W side of the
island for awhile -- a Park Ranger told us there were
3 young in the nest, but they were out of sight.
On top of Strawberry Hill a redtailed hawk settled on
top of a tree to enjoy a dinner of fresh rat, and was
constantly harrassed by two scrub jays and then by a
red-shouldered hawk who landed on the same tree.
We noticed later why this was good hunting for hawks:
the rats swim across the lake fairly slowly and are
sitting ducks so to speak.
There were 2 gadwall on the fenced in pond about
halfway up the hill, 2 Canada Geese on the east side
of the lake, and a black-crowned night heron in its
favorite spot on the island where the waterfall runs
into the lake.


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Glen Park Canyon

Mark W. Eaton <mweaton@...>
 

This morning I birded Glen Park Canyon and identified nothing unusual. However,
I did have one unseen warbler which only sang a couple times which superficially
sounded like a YELLOW WARBLER, but after reading Kevin's post, it actually
sounds closer to MAGNOLIA WARBLER. Of course, this should be viewed with quite
a bit of scepticism.

Of the stuff identified, there was a (presumed) WESTERN TANAGER (three syllable
call), several grosbeaks of which the only one seen was a BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK,
at least three BULLOCK'S ORIOLES including one in a plumage that was unfamilar
to me. All of the flight featers were brown and there was almost no yellow on
it. I don't have Jaramillo here with me, but is this a juvenile plumage?

Other mentionables include OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER, a RED-TAILED HAWK
successfully hunting, a STELLER'S JAY and I found a PYGMY NUTHATCH nest that's
easily accessible if anyone's looking for a photo op.

Mark
--
Mark Eaton mailto:mweaton@...
SFBirds Web Page http://home.pacbell.net/mweaton
Golden Gate Audubon Web Page http://goldengate.ca.audubon.org

"Money can add nothing to what I already have. What enables me to live
better is ideals. Besides, money is like snow in winter. It
accumulates slowly, but melts away rapidly."

- Ba Jin, July 1944, from the Epilogue of "Garden of Repose"
(Foreign Language Press, Beijing, China, first edition 1988. ISBN
0-8351-1055-9)


Re: Morning birds

Janice Andersen <Janandersen@...>
 

Once I read Kevin's message, had trouble concentrating on my work, so I gave up
and went out to Ft. Miley, got there are about 11 a.m. Wandered around quite
awhile (never been to Battery James Chester before). Fairly quiet other than
Brewer's blackbirds harrassing ravens (and vice versa) and a few cowbirds
"singing." Then I heard the song I've never heard before. Reminded me of a
Reader's Digest version of Warbling Vireo, but not as "warbling". This was on
the northeast side of the battery. I looked carefuly in the trees--lots of
dense foliage, so hard to get clear views of anything--for about 20 minutes.
Never saw it, and then the bird stopped singing. I waited around another 10 or
15 minutes. There was a good-sized tent (homeless camp?) not too far from where
I was standing, which made me a little nervous. And I was getting nervous
because I have so much work to do. May go back later and try again.

Jan

GASSTATION@... wrote:

This morning, after checking a fogged in and windy East Waah, I ran into
Brian Fitch at the Cliff House. There were the usual species present, but I
spotted a Parasitic Jaeger, reasonablly near shore and got Brian on it. A
very nice adult bird. There were some good Sooty Shearwaters in the flocks
well off shore, and lots of Murres on the move. After Brain went to work I
decided on a whim to check out Ft. Miley, seeing as how the fog was lifting.
I parked (illegally) at the VA Hospital and walked in. Immedialy I heard an
unfamiliar warbler song. I tracked the bird up on to Battery James Chester,
where I eventually found the male MAGNOLIA WARBLER foraging and singing in
the pines and cypresses west of the batterey. The bird was very difficult to
see, as it spent most of the time high up in the trees, but sang almost
constantly, and was easy to keep track of. I rechecked the washes and they
were quiet

Kevin McKereghan
Gasstation@...

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Re: Windy morning

Harry Fuller <harry_fuller@...>
 

Hundreds of RT Loons streaming north past Pacheco/Ocesn Beach this morning.
Couple of Cl Grebe offshore, all the usual summer birds including some adult
Heer Gulls, few Sanderlings and Whimbrel lingering onshore. Nothing unusual,
missed any Jaeger ;-(


2 for 3 ain't bad

Jay Withgott <withgott@...>
 

My wife and I chased the 3 eastern warbler species known to be present
in SF this morning and found two.
- Kevin's Hooded W. was s. of the flycasting pools at GGP singing away
at 10-10:30.
- Kevin's Magnolia W. was singing off & on at the east end of the
Battery above Ft. Miley around noon. (but I was skunked in the fog &
wind there yesterday evening.)
- No luck w/ Hugh's Nor. Parula at East Wash around 11, though Josiah
thought he heard a Summer Tanager there before we got there.

Jay

******************************************
Jay Withgott
Freelance science writer
San Francisco, California
415-452-6763
withgott@..., withgott@...
******************************************


Hooded Warbler

GASSTATION@...
 

After pretty quiet visits to Cliff House, Ft. Miley and West Wash, I hit
Middle Lake and while poking around the glen heard a song I didn't recognize.
I followed the song through the brush leading up to the SW corner of the
Fly-casting Pool and eventually got on a male HOODED WARBLER singing midway
up a cypress. I was able to look at it for several minutes before it
continued moving around. Not much else in the area (1 active Hutton's Vireo
nest). Since the Triatholon was coming soon, I headed to Glen Canyon. Usual
suspects, 1 unidentifed warbler song, 3 Lazuli Bunting, 1 Warbling Vireo, 3
BH Grosbeaks, OS Flycatchers... Heard Hugh's message about the Parula and
gave it a shot, fought my way through the bike race and did a loop around
the 17th Hole and East Wash, nothing doing.

Kevin McKereghan
Gasstation@...


HOODED WARBLER @ Mt. Davidson, 05/27/00

Paul Saraceni <Paul.Saraceni@...>
 

This morning I observed a female HOODED WARBLER at Mt. D around 8:25 for
approx. 1 minute. The warbler was foraging in a large round bush with
bright red berries on the left side of the main trail as you head north and
down from the summit -- approx. 1/3 of the way from the summit to the top of
the Ravine trail. There is a white flowering plant in front of this bush.
The Hooded repeatedly fanned its tail and flashed its characteristic white
outer tail feathers during my observation. I was unable to relocate the
warbler after my initial observation; I left Mt. D at 9:45.

Observations of local interest:

Band-tailed Pigeon 9
Western Wood-Pewee 1
Ash-throated Flycatcher 1
Swainson's Thrush 2
Warblers:
Yellow 1
Wilson's 7
Western Tanager 1
Black-headed Grosbeak 3
Lesser Goldfinch 6

Paul Saraceni
paul.saraceni@...


Re: HOODED WARBLER @ Mt. Davidson, 05/27/00

Alan Hopkins <ash@...>
 

Mt. Davidson is the Hooded Warbler capitol of California! That must be
about the sixth record in less than ten years.


Alan


Hooded Warbler, Red-eyed Vireo

Mark W. Eaton <mweaton@...>
 

This morning, Eric Preston and I headed out to see what we could turn up.
Ft. Miley and the washes were quiet, so we headed to Middle Lake. The glen
at the south end of Middle Lake appeared to be quiet, but after a quick
pish, I heard a quick 'whip-whip', not unlike the call of a Curve-billed
Thrasher. The bird was active in the foliage at the south end of the glen
and both of us got excellent looks at the RED-EYED VIREO in short order.
The dark line between the supercilium and the crown and the red eye were
both evident. It then gave a more typical "cheerawee" or something of that
ilk and moved up into the eucalyptus canopy where we finally lost it. Also
present was a HUTTON'S VIREO.

On the circuit around the lake, we heard an unfamiliar song (we hadn't heard
Rich's report yet), so we chased this down and found a/the gorgeous singing
male HOODED WARBLER, in its moving from the willows and myoporum/pittisporum
up into its typically habitat, a tall cypress :-) Maybe the female at Mt.
Davidson will eventually find its way to GGP!

Other birds of note on an otherwise quiet morning was a WHITE-THROATED SWIFT
at the north end of Lake Merced between the parking lot and the wooden
bridge and a PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER seemingly lost deep in the eucalyptus
northwest of the parking lot at the north end of Lake Merced.

Mark
--
Mark Eaton mailto:mweaton@...
SFBirds Web Page http://home.pacbell.net/mweaton
Golden Gate Audubon Web Page http://goldengate.ca.audubon.org

"Leaders should lead as far as they can then vanish. Their ashes
should not choke the fire they have lit."

- H.G. Wells (1866-1946)


Re: HOODED WARBLER @ Mt. Davidson, 05/27/00

Htcotter@...
 

Alan,
Based on what info I have available this would be the 4 th since 89, on Mt D
birds have been seen in 92, 94, 98 and 2000. The two yesterday would be the
15th and 16th in the city since 89. Unfortunately I probably only have
partial data, so maybe sf in general should be the Capital. 92 was the year
with 4 seen in the city.

Interestingly today while unsuccessfully looking for the RE Vireo, we had the
Hooded (presumably the same one) in the same glade at middle lake and it was
giving a different song to that it had been giving all morning.
Beautiful bird,
Hugh


Song Sparrow song?

Allan Ridley <aridley@...>
 

There is a song sparrow at the west end of Quarry Lake at the intersection of
trails leading out to JFK and up to the Rhododenron Dell, who is singing a
very unique song in my experience. (Perhaps an escapee from Dr. Baptista's
Lab?) -- Allan


Not a bird, but...

Mark W. Eaton <mweaton@...>
 

...forgot to mention that Eric and I had a COMMON GARTER SNAKE in Glen Park
Canyon on Sunday. Probably aren't too many of these guys/gals left in the
city :-(

Mark
--
Mark Eaton mailto:mweaton@...
SFBirds Web Page http://home.pacbell.net/mweaton
Golden Gate Audubon Web Page http://goldengate.ca.audubon.org

"Leaders should lead as far as they can then vanish. Their ashes
should not choke the fire they have lit."

- H.G. Wells (1866-1946)


Re: RB Grosbeak

GASSTATION@...
 

This morning at 7:15 I found a male RB Grosbeak singing in the ravine on the
north side of Mt. Davidson. If you go down the small trail below the summit
heading north there is a large open area 3/4 of the way to the point where
the trail heads East. The bird was singing in the Euc's there and feeding in
the bushes with the red berries (Hawthorne?). I felt the song had a slightly
slower cadence than a BH Grosbeak, but they weren't singing for comparison.
Otherwise a fairly slow morning. Nothing much at East and West Washes, Middle
Lake or Glen Canyon.

Kevin McKereghan
Gasstation@...