Date   

Snow Geese Back at Candlestick

Kevin Liberg
 

I was at Bayview Park this morning and when I looked down towards Candlestick Point, I could see white geese in the field.  When I got down to the field west of the fenced off Aux parking lot, there were 8 Snow Geese.  Maybe one was the Ross x Hybrid, I need to check photos.  There was also a Greater White-fronted with them.

I had not seen any Snow Geese there since December 24.  The main parking lot is open again with access from Gilman Ave.

Kevin Liberg
San Francisco


Re: Banded White-crowned sparrow

David Webster
 

Thanks all, for weighing in on this!

David Webster


On Thu, Jan 13, 2022 at 10:43 AM Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
I asked Mark Dettling of Point Blue for an update
on this project and it is pasted in below. I too
have been seeing these banded birds regularly at
the east end of the Concrete Bridge - all adults
this winter. I presume these are all nuttalli (as
opposed to pugentensis) but I don't know this for certain. Cheers, Peter

Hi Peter,
   These WCSP are part of a study that Elizabeth
Derryberry (now at the University of Knoxville)
has been running investigating differences in
song between urban (the SF birds) and rural (the
Bolinas/Pt Reyes birds) sites. The most recent
grad student to work on the project is Ruth
Simberloff. Our current lead bander at Palo, Mike
Mahoney, worked with Ruth last year and might
provide more detail (and pass along the sighting
to Ruth). They banded at both Lobos Creek and
Lake Merced, so these are their birds.

Mark

At 05:16 PM 1/12/2022, Linda Swanson wrote:
>This may be one of the banded White-crowned
>Sparrows from a research project in 2014 and
>2015. 41 White-crowned Sparrows were banded in
>SF in 2014 (unknown location) and additional
>White-crowned Sparrows were banded in 2015 at
>Lake Merced near the Concrete Bridge, and at
>Golden Gate Park near the Polo Fields.
>
>Here is info about the project from the sign used in the field:
>"Summary: We are investigating several factors
>affecting the song of local White-Crowned
>Sparrows. We are putting on color bracelets to
>keep track of the individual birds and working
>with audio recordings to analyze song and
>behavior. This study will provide valuable
>insights into avian communication.â€
>Researchers: from San Francisco State University and Tulane University
>Research Permit #032014 SF Parks and Rec
>#GOGA-2014-SCI-0017"
>
>I had the pleasure of being a volunteer field
>assistant to the grad student from SFSU working on this research project.
>Attached is a photo of a just-banded
>White-crowned Sparrow, Golden Gate Park, 4/24/2015.
>Linda Swanson
>
>
>
>>On Jan 12, 2022, at 3:54 PM, David Webster
>><<mailto:davisigno@...>davisigno@...> wrote:
>>
>>Just curious if anyone might know anything
>>about these bands. It's the first time I've
>>come across a banded sparrow. Seen in Lobos Creek this afternoon.
>>
>>David Webster
>>
>><DSCF3762.jpg>
> >


Re: Banded White-crowned sparrow

Peter Pyle
 

I asked Mark Dettling of Point Blue for an update on this project and it is pasted in below. I too have been seeing these banded birds regularly at the east end of the Concrete Bridge - all adults this winter. I presume these are all nuttalli (as opposed to pugentensis) but I don't know this for certain. Cheers, Peter

Hi Peter,
These WCSP are part of a study that Elizabeth Derryberry (now at the University of Knoxville) has been running investigating differences in song between urban (the SF birds) and rural (the Bolinas/Pt Reyes birds) sites. The most recent grad student to work on the project is Ruth Simberloff. Our current lead bander at Palo, Mike Mahoney, worked with Ruth last year and might provide more detail (and pass along the sighting to Ruth). They banded at both Lobos Creek and Lake Merced, so these are their birds.

Mark

At 05:16 PM 1/12/2022, Linda Swanson wrote:
This may be one of the banded White-crowned Sparrows from a research project in 2014 and 2015. 41 White-crowned Sparrows were banded in SF in 2014 (unknown location) and additional White-crowned Sparrows were banded in 2015 at Lake Merced near the Concrete Bridge, and at Golden Gate Park near the Polo Fields.

Here is info about the project from the sign used in the field:
"Summary: We are investigating several factors affecting the song of local White-Crowned Sparrows. We are putting on color bracelets to keep track of the individual birds and working with audio recordings to analyze song and behavior. This study will provide valuable insights into avian communication.â€&#65533;
Researchers: from San Francisco State University and Tulane University
Research Permit #032014 SF Parks and Rec
#GOGA-2014-SCI-0017"

I had the pleasure of being a volunteer field assistant to the grad student from SFSU working on this research project.
Attached is a photo of a just-banded White-crowned Sparrow, Golden Gate Park, 4/24/2015.
Linda Swanson



On Jan 12, 2022, at 3:54 PM, David Webster <<mailto:davisigno@...>davisigno@...> wrote:

Just curious if anyone might know anything about these bands. It's the first time I've come across a banded sparrow. Seen in Lobos Creek this afternoon.

David Webster

<DSCF3762.jpg>


Re: Banded White-crowned sparrow and Reporting Banded Birds

Linda Swanson
 

Always a good practice, and appreciated, to report encounters with banded, wing-tagged, collared (geese) birds to the North American Bird Banding Program. Please Report Bands at www.reportband.gov 

A Certificate of Appreciation will be sent, and includes data that is known, such as age and sex of bird, and the location and date of banding. To learn more about the USGS Bird Banding Lab https://www.usgs.gov/labs/bird-banding-laboratory  

A little long, but interesting, from the U.S. Geological Survey and Canadian Wildlife Service:
"Bird banding is important for studying the movement, survival and behavior of birds. About 60 million birds representing hundreds of species have been banded in North America since 1904. About 4 million bands have been recovered and reported. 

Data from banded birds are used in monitoring populations, setting hunting regulations, restoring endangered species, studying effects of environmental contaminants, and addressing such issues as Avian Influenza, bird hazards at airports, and crop depredations. Results from banding studies support national and international bird conservation programs such as Partners in Flight, the North American Waterfowl Management Plan, and Wetlands for the Americas.

The North American Bird Banding Program is under the general direction of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Canadian Wildlife Service. Cooperators include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mexico's National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity and Secretary of the Environment and Natural Resources; other federal, state and provincial conservation agencies; universities; amateur ornithologists; bird observatories; nature centers; nongovernmental organizations such as Ducks Unlimited and the National Audubon Society; environmental consulting firms and other private sector businesses. However, the most important partner in this cooperative venture is you, the person who voluntarily reported a recovered band. Thank you for your help.”

Linda Swanson

On Jan 12, 2022, at 5:16 PM, Linda Swanson via groups.io <lswanson@...> wrote:

This may be one of the banded White-crowned Sparrows from a research project in 2014 and 2015. 41 White-crowned Sparrows were banded in SF in 2014 (unknown location) and additional White-crowned Sparrows were banded in 2015 at Lake Merced near the Concrete Bridge, and at Golden Gate Park near the Polo Fields.

Here is info about the project from the sign used in the field:
"Summary: We are investigating several factors affecting the song of local White-Crowned Sparrows. We are putting on color bracelets to keep track of the individual birds and working with audio recordings to analyze song and behavior. This study will provide valuable insights into avian communication.”
Researchers: from San Francisco State University and Tulane University
Research Permit #032014 SF Parks and Rec
#GOGA-2014-SCI-0017"

I had the pleasure of being a volunteer field assistant to the grad student from SFSU working on this research project.
Attached is a photo of a just-banded White-crowned Sparrow, Golden Gate Park, 4/24/2015.
Linda Swanson

<IMG_2370.jpeg>

On Jan 12, 2022, at 3:54 PM, David Webster <davisigno@...> wrote:

Just curious if anyone might know anything about these bands. It's the first time I've come across a banded sparrow. Seen in Lobos Creek this afternoon.

David Webster

<DSCF3762.jpg>



Re: Banded White-crowned sparrow

Linda Swanson
 

This may be one of the banded White-crowned Sparrows from a research project in 2014 and 2015. 41 White-crowned Sparrows were banded in SF in 2014 (unknown location) and additional White-crowned Sparrows were banded in 2015 at Lake Merced near the Concrete Bridge, and at Golden Gate Park near the Polo Fields.

Here is info about the project from the sign used in the field:
"Summary: We are investigating several factors affecting the song of local White-Crowned Sparrows. We are putting on color bracelets to keep track of the individual birds and working with audio recordings to analyze song and behavior. This study will provide valuable insights into avian communication.”
Researchers: from San Francisco State University and Tulane University
Research Permit #032014 SF Parks and Rec
#GOGA-2014-SCI-0017"

I had the pleasure of being a volunteer field assistant to the grad student from SFSU working on this research project.
Attached is a photo of a just-banded White-crowned Sparrow, Golden Gate Park, 4/24/2015.
Linda Swanson


On Jan 12, 2022, at 3:54 PM, David Webster <davisigno@...> wrote:

Just curious if anyone might know anything about these bands. It's the first time I've come across a banded sparrow. Seen in Lobos Creek this afternoon.

David Webster

<DSCF3762.jpg>


Banded White-crowned sparrow

David Webster
 

Just curious if anyone might know anything about these bands. It's the first time I've come across a banded sparrow. Seen in Lobos Creek this afternoon.

David Webster


Sapsucker behavior question Golden Gate Park botanical gardens

Jim Chiropolos
 

Work took me to SF today and I visited the golden gate park botanical gardens where I enjoyed three different sapsuckers- all in different well trees maybe about 75 yards apart.

Sapsucker 1 - Mostly red-breasted with prominent white face stripe.
Sapsucker 2 - Intergrade red-naped red-breasted with black cheek and white face stripe.
Sapsucker 3 - Female red-naped.

These birds are so different its like they are banded! I always thought a sapsucker would use one tree well/location, and defend it, but ebird reports suggest they are traveling - maybe trap lining!

I will not visit again but can a local who visits the garden on a regular basis verify if they are trap-lining or only using one territory? Its rare to have three unique birds use the same area and I am fascinated about behavior. If an observer staked out one tree would they see all three over the course of the day in a single well tree? If trap lining is their schedule similar from day to day in which tree and time they appear at? This could be a cool easy research paper!

I wish I was a local and could answer  these questions by patch birding!

And a big thanks to Alan H for giving me a tour as he knew all the well tree locations ! Finally, both Alan and myself remarked how overall non- birdy the garden seemed to be compared to previous years.

Jim Chiropolos 
always asking questions from the east bay!


Crissy waterfowl Jan 11

Dave Weber
 


Common Merganser was upstream in the quartermasters reach, under the Marina offramp. GWF Goose and Common Goldeneye on the lagoon. Male GW Teal on the bay off parking lot.


Dave Weber,
Milpitas
By phone


Sequoia Monthly Meeting - Thurs. Jan 13 - Birds of POST lands

Sequoia Audubon Society
 

January 13 Birds of Protected Lands – POST’s enrichment of Bay Area avifauna Diane and Peter Hart

Diane and Peter Hart are adult-onset birders who slouched into birding and bird photography while winding down their professional careers. Diane as an educator and author of 20 textbooks, Peter as an Artificial Intelligence and robotics pioneer, founded or led half a dozen companies and international research centers. They have complemented their field time with volunteer service to the word of birds, Diane as past president of the Santa Clara Valley Audubon Society, and Peter as a Board member of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

In the Summer of 2020, as the full scope and impact of COVID became apparent, Diane had the bright idea of using the enforced isolation and separation from others as an opportunity to start a new bird photography project. Her concept was to create a photographic record of the avifauna found on lands protected by POST, the Peninsula Open Space Trust.

Working as a team, they have photographed birds on more than 50 POST-protected locations and created the photo gallery Birds of Protected Lands (https://birds.smugmug.com). The gallery currently holds nearly 2,000 photos representing 196 species from 49 avian families. The photos are organized taxonomically by family and species, as you would find in any field guide.

Our talk will present the best-of-the-best of these photos, organized not taxonomically but as you would find species if you visited the many distinct habitats that POST has protected. 
This meeting is on ZOOM, not in-person. Register: http://www.sequoia-audubon.org/meetings.html
Join us at 6:30 for online socializing, meeting starts at 7:00pm 


Crissy Common Merganser

Jonah Benningfield
 

Hey all,

I might just be out-of-the-loop here, but Augie Kramer and I were surprised today to see a female Common Merganser awkwardly waddling its elongated body along the mudflats at Quartermaster Reach. However, we ran into Moses Alvarez (finder of the White Wagtail last spring), who informed us that the bird has been around for a week now, and mentioned his iNat post from January 8th (http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/104596777)

I looked on eBird for any other reports, and noted that nobody has submitted to the main Crissy Field hotspot yet in 2022, so maybe we just haven’t been looking. Matt Zlatunich has an eBird report up from this morning reporting 2 from offshore (https://ebird.org/checklist/S100511030); not sure if one of those is the same bird we saw. 

all the best,
Jonah B. 


Great Horned Owls at Bison paddock nesting site

zombieaaroneleven@...
 

Heading home from North lake I noticed two GHOs in the tree they used to nest in a couple of years ago. The single tree on south side of JFK across from the bison shelter. One was in the nest, one above.


Blackburnian Warbler at Holly Park

Rajan Rao
 

Foraging in the flowers around backstop.


Battery Godfrey Brant

Daniel Scali
 

Happy New Year birders!

Battery watch turned up 2 Brant floating reasonably close in about an hour ago. Maybe a couple 100 m out. They were near some floating logs. Stayed put the whole time.

Good 2022 birding,
Dan Scali, sf


Yellow Bellied Sapsucker in Botanical Garden

David Assmann
 

Yellow Bellied Sapsucker in Coast Live Oak - north east of California Garden in Botanical Garden in Golden Gate Park - making nasal meow like calls


WW Dove continues Jan 9

Dave Weber
 

White-winged Dove well-seen this morning at Lafayette Park. Moving around west part, somewhat centered around the restroom. 

Dave Weber,
Milpitas
By phone


Rock Sandpiper continues, Heron's Head Park

tracy_farrington
 

After a patient search of around an hour, Hugh Harvey and I spotted the continuing
Rock Sandpiper on the north side of the jetty, 100+ feet from the end, at around 11am. 
Quite unperturbed, it patiently gleaned through wet vegetation on the rock
surfaces nearest the water. A fine looking little bird, it is. Hope those of you interested are able 
to get over and see it.

Good birding, all.
Tracy Farrington
Walnut Creek


Final tally from Richmond CBC

Derek
 

The eBird Trip Report link below uses new functionality rolled out by eBird just in time for the CBC’s.  It is a very nice way to drill down on the data from our January 2 count day:

 

https://ebird.org/tripreport/29772

 

Some highlights from count week:

·       172 species, 5 better than our original projection.

·       Nine of the 172 species seen on count week not count day.

·       Highlight species of count week include Tundra Swan, Rock Wren, Caspian Tern, Heermann’s Gull, Black Scoter, Golden Eagle, Bald Eagle, Saw-whet Owl, Ferruginous Hawk and Short-eared Owl.

·       Amazingly, despite the king tide not one rail was seen on count day.  Other expected (our first count so a little hard to judge) but missed were Pine Siskin, Wood Duck and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher.

·       48,677 birds seen of which 8,172 were not classified down to the species level; for example 4,475 were classified as Great/Lesser Scaup. 

·       180 total participants. We had quite a few cancels, possibly due to this being the first count but also to the Covid surge. But still a great turnout nonetheless as we originally set 150 as our goal.

 

One last thank to everyone who helped make this event a successful launch.  This was also basically a kick-off of GGAS’s initiative to significantly increase its presence in Richmond and surrounding communities. Look for related announcements in the months ahead and please consider contributing to that effort.

 

Derek Heins and Karen Noel

Co-compilers

 


White-Winged Dove at Lafayette Park

David Assmann
 

The WHITE-WINGED DOVE last report in Lafayette Park was there again this morning, hanging out on the tennis courts with EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVES and MOURNING DOVES.  And a NASHVILLE WARBLER was in the Community Garden at Fort Mason (first seen yesterday - a few days too late for the CBC).


Inaugural Richmond CBC preliminary results

Derek
 

In cold, clear weather today’s teams in the field found 158 species, with highlights being Rock Wren, Redheads at two locations, Caspian Tern, Lark Sparrow, Heermann’s Gull, Black Scoter, Golden and Bald Eagle.  Despite a mid-morning king tide not one Sora, Virginia Rail or Ridgeway’s Rail was reported.  Wow.  Other misses were Cinnamon Teal, Semipalmated Plover and Pine Siskin. 

Our count week started on Thursday and in those 3 preceding days we picked up Ridgeway’s Rail, Barn Owl, Semipalmated Plover, Ferruginous Hawk, Rufous-crowned Sparrow, Surfbird, Barn Swallow, Short-eared Owl and Tundra Swan, putting us at 167 species with the next 3 days to pick up more.

We don’t have previous years for comparison, but I had projected 167 species based on eBird history in the circle, etc. Some targets to be on the lookout for through the end of our count week Wednesday include Cinnamon Teal, Short-billed Dowitcher, Sora, Pine Siskin, Virginia Rail, Red Knot, Pacific Loon, Red-necked Grebe, Barrow’s Goldeneye, Wood Duck, Western Screech-Owl, Northern Saw-whet Owl, and Blue-Winged Teal.  If you do see something you think might be new to our count and don’t report on eBird please either post it on EBB or email me at dlheins@....

Lastly, a big thanks to everyone who joined today, many who were first time CBC participants.  We have the next twelve months for next steps in our long-term goal of engaging with organizations (environmental, community gardens, schools, etc.) in Richmond and its surrounding communities to spread the joy of birding and engaging with nature.  Please join in these efforts as they are announced by GGAS.

Derek Heins

 


Re: San Francisco Christmas Bird Count - tomorrow is the last day of Count Week

Donald Lewis
 

Hooded Mergansers at North Lake.

 

Saturday there were at least eleven (seen at once) and probably at least 20 Hooded Mergansers at North Lake.

 

Don Lewis

Lafayette, CA

 

 

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