Date   

Re: Non-avian

Rudyard Wallen
 

 Call TMMC 415-289-7325

On Jul 29, 2021, at 7:56 AM, Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:

Since Sutro was fogged out, I walked the beach, and among the multiple corpses was a dying sea lion.  If anyone knows which agency might respond and be able to stop its suffering before the dogs get it, please contact them.  It’s at the foot of Moraga.  The medium brown fur, sloped forehead and white face make wonder about species.
Brian Fitch


Non-avian

Brian Fitch
 

Since Sutro was fogged out, I walked the beach, and among the multiple corpses was a dying sea lion.  If anyone knows which agency might respond and be able to stop its suffering before the dogs get it, please contact them.  It’s at the foot of Moraga.  The medium brown fur, sloped forehead and white face make wonder about species.
Brian Fitch


Re: Red Whiskered Bulbul at Fort Mason

janet ellis
 

I’ve seen a lot at the Los Angeles Arboretum and Botanical Gardens in Arcadia and the nearby neighborhoods. 

Janet Ellis
Newark




On Wednesday, July 28, 2021, 3:48 PM, Alok Singhal <gandalf013@...> wrote:

Same, I saw them in India all the time.  Apparently they are quite an invasive species so I think it's worrisome that they are in California.  http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1230:

Pycnonotus jocosus (red-whiskered bulbul) has been found to damage commercial crops, compete with and displace native passerines, prey on endemic young birds and arthropods, and spread invasive plant species (Clergeau & Mandon-Dalger, 2001; Linnebjerg et al. 2009; Linnebjerg et al., in press). In California this species has signficantly damaged citrus crops. On Oahu Island, Hawai'i it consumes commercial fruits and flowers such as papaya and orchids. Damage to agriculture has been documented in other parts of its introduced range in Florida, La Réunion and Mauritius.


On Wed, Jul 28, 2021 at 3:20 PM R K Bose via groups.io <fk94131=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
That sounds amazing!
Thanks!
Seen them in India, but astounded that one's appeared here.
(I just looked up Google, and it seems Miami has a small flock. Wonder if it can survive in California.)

Rupa Bose


On Wednesday, July 28, 2021, 08:40:16 AM PDT, David Assmann via groups.io <david_assmann=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Battery 


Re: Red Whiskered Bulbul at Fort Mason

Alok Singhal
 

Same, I saw them in India all the time.  Apparently they are quite an invasive species so I think it's worrisome that they are in California.  http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/species.php?sc=1230:

Pycnonotus jocosus (red-whiskered bulbul) has been found to damage commercial crops, compete with and displace native passerines, prey on endemic young birds and arthropods, and spread invasive plant species (Clergeau & Mandon-Dalger, 2001; Linnebjerg et al. 2009; Linnebjerg et al., in press). In California this species has signficantly damaged citrus crops. On Oahu Island, Hawai'i it consumes commercial fruits and flowers such as papaya and orchids. Damage to agriculture has been documented in other parts of its introduced range in Florida, La Réunion and Mauritius.


On Wed, Jul 28, 2021 at 3:20 PM R K Bose via groups.io <fk94131=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
That sounds amazing!
Thanks!
Seen them in India, but astounded that one's appeared here.
(I just looked up Google, and it seems Miami has a small flock. Wonder if it can survive in California.)

Rupa Bose


On Wednesday, July 28, 2021, 08:40:16 AM PDT, David Assmann via groups.io <david_assmann=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Battery 


Re: Red Whiskered Bulbul at Fort Mason

Adam Winer
 

Red-whiskered Bulbuls are on the California list as an introduced species, but entirely because of the well-established population in southern California (in the general vicinity of Los Angeles).

However, a bird in San Francisco is most likely a local escapee. 

On Wed, Jul 28, 2021 at 3:20 PM R K Bose via groups.io <fk94131=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
That sounds amazing!
Thanks!
Seen them in India, but astounded that one's appeared here.
(I just looked up Google, and it seems Miami has a small flock. Wonder if it can survive in California.)

Rupa Bose


On Wednesday, July 28, 2021, 08:40:16 AM PDT, David Assmann via groups.io <david_assmann=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Battery 


Re: Red Whiskered Bulbul at Fort Mason

R K Bose
 

That sounds amazing!
Thanks!
Seen them in India, but astounded that one's appeared here.
(I just looked up Google, and it seems Miami has a small flock. Wonder if it can survive in California.)

Rupa Bose


On Wednesday, July 28, 2021, 08:40:16 AM PDT, David Assmann via groups.io <david_assmann@...> wrote:


Battery 


Red Whiskered Bulbul at Fort Mason

David Assmann
 

Battery 


Re: Eurasian Collared Dove in Glen Park

 

Hi Roberta,

I wouldn’t worry about the Mourning Doves.  The Eurasian Collared Dove population in San Francisco appears to me to be on the decrease since it’s peak about a decade ago.

Interestingly in this past decade we’ve also seen the increase in Cooper’s hawks breeding in the city. Perhaps there’s a connection there?

Dominik 


On Jul 28, 2021, at 07:23, Roberta Guise <roberta@...> wrote:

At 7:10am Wed, July 28, my first-ever Glen Park Eurasian sighting on a wire across Diamond at Sussex. It put out a prolonged coo-coo sequence, was hyper-active, then flew off.

Is it an ominous sign for Mournings?

Roberta Guise


Eurasian Collared Dove in Glen Park

Roberta Guise
 

At 7:10am Wed, July 28, my first-ever Glen Park Eurasian sighting on a wire across Diamond at Sussex. It put out a prolonged coo-coo sequence, was hyper-active, then flew off.

Is it an ominous sign for Mournings?

Roberta Guise


Cook's Petrels and other tubenoses off our coast

Peter Pyle
 

Got a report from Kirsten Lindquist of the Greater Farallon Association of some Cook's Petrels and other interesting tubenoses seen during the ACCESS cruise over the past three days:

July 24 - Hawaiian Petrel (1), and Cook's Petrel (3 single observations over a 3 hr transit) Marin County off Bolinas in the proximity of the shelf break and off the shelf.

July 25 - Cook's Petrel (3 single observations over a 3 hr transit), Marin County off Point Reyes in the proximity of the shelf break and off the shelf.

July 26 - Cook's Petrel (5 single observations during a 3 hr transit), Manx Shearwater (1), Wilson's Storm-Petrel (1), Laysan Albatross (1) Sonoma County in the proximity of Cordell Bank and off the shelf.

The ACCESS research cruise (Applied California Current Ecosystem Studies) is conducted in partnership by Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary, Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, and Point Blue Conservation Science. For more information: https://www.facebook.com/ACCESSoceans and a map of the cruise track is here: https://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/ppreviews-plos-725668748/2598239/preview.jpg.

Looks like it may be one of those years in which COPEs are closer to shore than usual, perhaps due to the good ocean productivity during thei La Nina year.

Good birding, Peter


The first offshore pelagic of the season.

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Hello all,

   This last Saturday we operated our “summer pelagic” out of Pillar Point (Half Moon Bay), visiting the Pioneer Canyon in San Francisco county as well as the offshore waters to the south of there in San Mateo county. It was a heck of a good trip. We had low wind, which sometimes people worry about in terms of moving the birds around, but it was not an issue. Some of the common species were out in force such as Common Murre, Sooty Shearwater, yet we saw few Rhinoceros Auklets and Cassin’s Auklets, and moderate Pink-footed shearwaters and Northern Fulmar numbers. The Auklets might be hanging nearer to the Farallons still? As is typically the case at this time of year, great luck with Marbled Murrelets on our way out with 7 or so breeding plumaged adults.

    Things got interesting from the Pioneer Canyon on south. We located a Black Cod fishing boat, with over 70 Black-footed Albatross around it! Amazing, unfortunately no other albatross joined in, but in the end we saw more than 100 albatross for the day. Astounding. Heading south from there a few Ashy Storm Petrels showed up and we began to pick up Sabine’s Gulls. Recall that last year we had nearly no Sabine’s or offshore terns, so seeing a number of Sabine’s on Saturday was welcome. Although a total of only 4 or so jaegers were seen, they included all three species.

    The real surprises came a bit later when Zac Denning spotted a Leach’s Storm-Petrel, which was nicely photographed by Mark Rauzon. This bird showed up just as we saw a couple of Ashy and a Black storm-petrel rise from the surface. So unfortunately most of the boat were watching those, while the bow was looking at the Leach’s. Leach’s is seldom seen where we go, as they tend to feed well offshore. So it is definitely a local rarity. Just a tad later a Manx Shearwater took off from the water, and again was photographed by Mark, allowing us to see that it was molting inner primaries. Interesting! This bird was a county bird for Chris Hayward, who has been looking for one for years, and certainly was a “jinx” bird given how much time Chris has spent out on the ocean. Good stuff. A couple more Black Storm Petrels showed up later, which I find interesting as it is not a particularly warm water year and usually we do not find them this early in the season. Perhaps it is too warm farther south for them, and they are already moving up? A fly by Tufted Puffin was awesome, as were the many Humpback Whales, and Pacific White-sided Dolphins we saw.

  Photos of the goodies here:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S92256844

 

Our next trips are to the Farallon Islands. We actually have two openings for the July 31 trip (this Saturday), and we often have last minute cancellations. So if interested, do contact me offline. Otherwise, the next offshore pelagic is on Aug 14. Birds should be rocking by then given what we have already found!

      https://www.alvarosadventures.com/pelagic-dates-2021.html

 

good birding,

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 


Re: Snowy Plovers and Red-Necked Phalarope on Ocean Beach

Dominik Mosur
 

Margaret, David et al.,

Snowy plovers can and will nest on beach dune habitat anywhere along the central California coast. The only reason they don’t attempt do so at certain beaches like ocean beach in San Francisco is because of the rate of disturbance events (human, or other predator esp. in our region Common Raven)
If an experiment was to be conducted with a certain area of Ocean Beach fenced  off and  people/Dogs kept out I predict  snowy plovers would attempt to nest there and we’d posting observations of eggs and young being eaten by ravens.

Dominik 





On Jul 24, 2021, at 14:29, Stan Zeavin <margstan@...> wrote:


David,

Those dates are remarkable.  

We have always hesitated even to monitor at all during the summer since the city rents out Pacifica State beach to surfing camps during the week and surfing contests - including dog surfing which invites hundreds of dogs -  on the weekend. And now with COVID-19 the beach is always overrun with people who have discovered us all weekend. As reluctant as we are to visit the beach during the summer, it look like we need to start checking earlier at Linda Mar.

Thanks so much,

Margaret
On Friday, July 23, 2021, 08:25:27 PM PDT, David Assmann via groups.io <david_assmann@...> wrote:


There is one record from June 30th, and several from the first week of July.

On Friday, July 23, 2021, 8:14:22 PM PDT, Stan Zeavin <margstan@...> wrote:


Does anyone know what the previous earliest date for their return was?
In Pacifica we saw them one year toward the end of August, but there's no record of earlier.

Margaret Goodale

On Friday, July 23, 2021, 06:23:51 PM PDT, David Assmann via groups.io <david_assmann@...> wrote:


SNOWY PLOVERS are back on Ocean Beach - there were seven on the sand near Lawton this morning.  Lots of SANDERLINGS and WHIMBRELS. Also a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE in with the SANDERLINGS.


Re: Snowy Plovers and Red-Necked Phalarope on Ocean Beach

Stan Zeavin
 

David,

Those dates are remarkable.  

We have always hesitated even to monitor at all during the summer since the city rents out Pacifica State beach to surfing camps during the week and surfing contests - including dog surfing which invites hundreds of dogs -  on the weekend. And now with COVID-19 the beach is always overrun with people who have discovered us all weekend. As reluctant as we are to visit the beach during the summer, it look like we need to start checking earlier at Linda Mar.

Thanks so much,

Margaret

On Friday, July 23, 2021, 08:25:27 PM PDT, David Assmann via groups.io <david_assmann@...> wrote:


There is one record from June 30th, and several from the first week of July.

On Friday, July 23, 2021, 8:14:22 PM PDT, Stan Zeavin <margstan@...> wrote:


Does anyone know what the previous earliest date for their return was?
In Pacifica we saw them one year toward the end of August, but there's no record of earlier.

Margaret Goodale

On Friday, July 23, 2021, 06:23:51 PM PDT, David Assmann via groups.io <david_assmann@...> wrote:


SNOWY PLOVERS are back on Ocean Beach - there were seven on the sand near Lawton this morning.  Lots of SANDERLINGS and WHIMBRELS. Also a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE in with the SANDERLINGS.


Re: Snowy Plovers and Red-Necked Phalarope on Ocean Beach

Stan Zeavin
 

Does anyone know what the previous earliest date for their return was?
In Pacifica we saw them one year toward the end of August, but there's no record of earlier.

Margaret Goodale

On Friday, July 23, 2021, 06:23:51 PM PDT, David Assmann via groups.io <david_assmann@...> wrote:


SNOWY PLOVERS are back on Ocean Beach - there were seven on the sand near Lawton this morning.  Lots of SANDERLINGS and WHIMBRELS. Also a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE in with the SANDERLINGS.


Re: Snowy Plovers and Red-Necked Phalarope on Ocean Beach

David Assmann
 

There is one record from June 30th, and several from the first week of July.

On Friday, July 23, 2021, 8:14:22 PM PDT, Stan Zeavin <margstan@...> wrote:


Does anyone know what the previous earliest date for their return was?
In Pacifica we saw them one year toward the end of August, but there's no record of earlier.

Margaret Goodale

On Friday, July 23, 2021, 06:23:51 PM PDT, David Assmann via groups.io <david_assmann@...> wrote:


SNOWY PLOVERS are back on Ocean Beach - there were seven on the sand near Lawton this morning.  Lots of SANDERLINGS and WHIMBRELS. Also a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE in with the SANDERLINGS.


Snowy Plovers and Red-Necked Phalarope on Ocean Beach

David Assmann
 

SNOWY PLOVERS are back on Ocean Beach - there were seven on the sand near Lawton this morning.  Lots of SANDERLINGS and WHIMBRELS. Also a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE in with the SANDERLINGS.


Yosemite slough

Rachel Lawrence
 

Sorry I omitted to say Yosemite Slough Community Garden pond for Wilson’s phalarope 


Wilson’s phalarope

Rachel Lawrence
 

Currently there is a Wilson’s phalarope swimming and walking on the mud in the community garden pond west side of berm.  Caution: The situation down there is less inviting than ever….


Pier 94 report

Eddie Bartley
 

Pier 94: Noreen and I have been dropping by weekly trying to save some of the young plants from the drought conditions. Between us and others it's helping too. This is always the time of year for low bird diversity, but this summers seems lower than usual. 

A smattering of shorebirds with 2 Whimbrel and 1 LB Curlew, 4 HY Western Sandpipers on 7/5. Also we noted 23 Elegant Terns that day, which I think was early-ish. 6 days later 1 Least Sandpiper, age unknown.

Songbirds have been quiet for a while, Red-winged Blackbirds apparently dispersed early, one successful Bushtit nest.

Today was relatively a bonanza for breeding songbirds with one recently fledged White-crowned Sparrow and a fledgling Savannah Sparrow (first ever I found here). Yay for that!

Happy Trails!

Eddie Bartley


Crissy Lagoon Local Interest - Red-Necked Phalarope and the Changing of the Terns

David Assmann
 

The transition from CASPIAN TERNS to ELEGANT TERNS in Crissy Lagoon has followed the usual summer pattern.  CASPIAN TERNS first showed up in large numbers on June 30th (41), peaked on July 10th at 111, and are now down to about a dozen. There was only one ELEGANT TERN on June 30th, and they remained in low numbers through the first half of the month, and have increased over the past few days, with at least 350 there this morning. The AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS have been present virtually every day since June 24th, with as many as 7 at a time. Shorebirds have been trickling through in the past week, with a SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER, a MARBLED GODWIT, a LONG-BILLED CURLEW, a GREATER YELLOWLEGS, a BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, several WESTERN and LEAST SANDPIPERS, and today, a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE.  Recently hatched KILLDEER have been fun to watch in Quartermaster Reach.

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