Date   

Yellow bellied sapsucker

Rachel Lawrence
 

Refound yesterday by Rob Cullison continues in dead pine viewable east of dirt patch at end of dog park , Corona Heights. Likely same bird as in Buena Vista you can see the trees in Manor Park from here 


Red-throated Loon at Candlestick Point

Mick Griffin
 

Also at Candlestick point yesterday this Red-throated Loon molting into breeding plumage, quite close to shore south-east corner..







Mick Griffin
LONDON TILE
415.302.1489






CA Thrasher Photo

David Nelson
 

This is a photo I took at 1:20 am, of the CA Thrasher at Candlestick Point Park about 1:20pm today. It was cooperative if you stood very still.

Good birding!
David W. Nelson


CA Thrasher at Candlestick Point

David Nelson
 

Still here across from the restroom building at the end of the point (SE).

Good birding!

David W. Nelson


California Thrasher

Chris Vance
 

I made a mistake by saying the thrasher was on the southwestern side of the spit at Candlestick Pt.  
Here is where I saw the thrasher: 37.708682, -122.374811. It is southeastern.
Chris Vance


Re: Vireo reports

Adam Winer
 

As Dominik notes, there are exceedingly few records of any members of the "Solitary" Vireo complex at this time of year.  The image attached below is the eBird barcharts for the combined Bay Area counties - you'd conclude from this data that Plumbeous Vireo is equally likely if not more so than Cassin's, but none are likely at all.  (No, I'm not suggesting people saw Plumbeous.)  And none of those January/February/early March records in eBird are from San Francisco.  I can't say that any one of these records is certainly erroneous, but I can say that the notion that *all* of these reports are correct strains credulity.

At any rate, the basic rule applies:  these would be exceptional records, and therefore they need good documentation.  Even if one was seen well enough to confidently identify it as a "Solitary" Vireo, you'd still need careful elimination of both Blue-headed and Plumbeous Vireos.  And note that at this time of year, these would all typically be on the dull side, making identification even more challenging.

image.png

-- Adam Winer

On Mon, Mar 1, 2021 at 8:22 PM Dominik Mosur <dominikmosur@...> wrote:
John,

A Cassin’s vireo at this time of year in SF would almost certainly be an overwintering bird.

While we have a couple of winter records over the years, this seems to me a very normal occurrence of one inexperienced observers making an erroneous report that then convinces other inexperienced observers that’s it’s not time to start reporting the species.
This happens every year and is part of the learning process. No harm done.


On Mar 1, 2021, at 19:20, John Facchini <john.facchini@...> wrote:


Hello Dominik,

I followed up on Ken's post and saw a vireo that was mostly gray and had clear (but not very bold) white spectacles - the bill eliminated kinglets and warblers.  I only saw one and didn't hear any vocalizations.  I was focused on making sure I got a clear look at the spectacles and didn't get much of a view of the underside of the bird.  I was comfortable with a cassin's vireo ID.  Your post makes this seem like either an exceptional sighting or a mistaken ID.  I don't mean to ruffle any feathers and am ok removing my sighting from ebird if you would like me to. 

Regards, 
John Facchini

On Mon, Mar 1, 2021 at 2:10 PM Dominik Mosur <dominikmosur@...> wrote:
With all due respect to those posting: Regarding these reports of multiple Cassin’s Vireos from multiple locations , please note that over many decades now a typical arrival
Date for Cassins Vireo in SF is around the first days of April. A few exceptionally early birds have been noted by the third week of March.

Cassin’s vireos winter in Mexico. There’s typically a pulse of migrants noted in SoCal before we start seeing them up here.

Good birding,

Dominik


On Mar 1, 2021, at 10:40, Ken Moy <ken.moy62@...> wrote:


Hi all, 2 Cassin's vireos (1 seen, 2 heard) on Oak Woodlands on the wooden box steps leading to Stanyan and Fulton.

Good birding.

Ken Moy


Re: Vireo reports

 

John,

A Cassin’s vireo at this time of year in SF would almost certainly be an overwintering bird.

While we have a couple of winter records over the years, this seems to me a very normal occurrence of one inexperienced observers making an erroneous report that then convinces other inexperienced observers that’s it’s not time to start reporting the species.
This happens every year and is part of the learning process. No harm done.


On Mar 1, 2021, at 19:20, John Facchini <john.facchini@...> wrote:


Hello Dominik,

I followed up on Ken's post and saw a vireo that was mostly gray and had clear (but not very bold) white spectacles - the bill eliminated kinglets and warblers.  I only saw one and didn't hear any vocalizations.  I was focused on making sure I got a clear look at the spectacles and didn't get much of a view of the underside of the bird.  I was comfortable with a cassin's vireo ID.  Your post makes this seem like either an exceptional sighting or a mistaken ID.  I don't mean to ruffle any feathers and am ok removing my sighting from ebird if you would like me to. 

Regards, 
John Facchini

On Mon, Mar 1, 2021 at 2:10 PM Dominik Mosur <dominikmosur@...> wrote:
With all due respect to those posting: Regarding these reports of multiple Cassin’s Vireos from multiple locations , please note that over many decades now a typical arrival
Date for Cassins Vireo in SF is around the first days of April. A few exceptionally early birds have been noted by the third week of March.

Cassin’s vireos winter in Mexico. There’s typically a pulse of migrants noted in SoCal before we start seeing them up here.

Good birding,

Dominik


On Mar 1, 2021, at 10:40, Ken Moy <ken.moy62@...> wrote:


Hi all, 2 Cassin's vireos (1 seen, 2 heard) on Oak Woodlands on the wooden box steps leading to Stanyan and Fulton.

Good birding.

Ken Moy


Re: California Thrasher continues at Candlestick Park - ACCESS ISSUES

Chris Vance
 

I saw the California Thrasher this afternoon at 1:15 on the south western corner of the park. Hundreds of ground squirrels at this park which was maddening as they are about the same size as the thrasher. And no raptors in sight.
All the best,
Chris Vance

On Mon, Mar 1, 2021 at 1:57 PM Robbie Fischer <robbie22@...> wrote:
Joe Morlan and I tried to visit Candlestick Park this morning to look for the thrasher. We were unaware that all parking lots are closed and dilapidated RV'S and other vehicles line Hunter's Point Expressway in front of the park. We were uncomfortable parking our car for fear it would be vandalized so we did not stay. 

Just a heads up for anyone trying for the California Thrasher.

Robbie Fischer
Pacifica

On Sunday, February 28, 2021, 01:45:07 PM PST, David Assmann via groups.io <david_assmann=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


The CALIFORNIA THRASHER found Thursday at Candlestick Park continues this morning.  It was almost at the end of the spit in the south eastern corner of the park.


Vireo reports

 

With all due respect to those posting: Regarding these reports of multiple Cassin’s Vireos from multiple locations , please note that over many decades now a typical arrival
Date for Cassins Vireo in SF is around the first days of April. A few exceptionally early birds have been noted by the third week of March.

Cassin’s vireos winter in Mexico. There’s typically a pulse of migrants noted in SoCal before we start seeing them up here.

Good birding,

Dominik


On Mar 1, 2021, at 10:40, Ken Moy <ken.moy62@...> wrote:


Hi all, 2 Cassin's vireos (1 seen, 2 heard) on Oak Woodlands on the wooden box steps leading to Stanyan and Fulton.

Good birding.

Ken Moy


Re: California Thrasher continues at Candlestick Park - ACCESS ISSUES

Robbie Fischer
 

Joe Morlan and I tried to visit Candlestick Park this morning to look for the thrasher. We were unaware that all parking lots are closed and dilapidated RV'S and other vehicles line Hunter's Point Expressway in front of the park. We were uncomfortable parking our car for fear it would be vandalized so we did not stay. 

Just a heads up for anyone trying for the California Thrasher.

Robbie Fischer
Pacifica

On Sunday, February 28, 2021, 01:45:07 PM PST, David Assmann via groups.io <david_assmann@...> wrote:


The CALIFORNIA THRASHER found Thursday at Candlestick Park continues this morning.  It was almost at the end of the spit in the south eastern corner of the park.

_._,_._,_

--
Robbie Fischer
Pacifica, CA


Cassin's vireos in Oak Woodlands @ GGP

Ken Moy
 

Hi all, 2 Cassin's vireos (1 seen, 2 heard) on Oak Woodlands on the wooden box steps leading to Stanyan and Fulton.

Good birding.

Ken Moy


Cassin's vireo by Middle Lake

Loretta
 

Hi Folks,

I saw a Cassin's vireo yesterday morning, around 9:15 am. It was in the tall pines in the meadow south of Middle Lake, directly in front of the parking lot. Two Townsends were foraging in the general area as well.

Clear spectacles, a short rising call.

It flitted around for about 15 minutes, then disappeared. I wasn't able to refind it.

Apologies for the delayed report.

Good birding,

Loretta


California Thrasher continues at Candlestick Park

David Assmann
 

The CALIFORNIA THRASHER found Thursday at Candlestick Park continues this morning.  It was almost at the end of the spit in the south eastern corner of the park.


Re: How safe is it to visit Heron’s Head Park

Janet Carpinelli
 

Hi Elliotte

I walk my dog out there at least once/week often about that time if you want to meet some time. I concur with everyone---perfectly safe to walk, must not leave any valuables (at least not visible) and lock up!


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 8:12 AM Elliotte Rusty Harold <elharo@...> wrote:
Don't leave anything in your car, trunk included. Break-ins occur regularly here, as they do almost everywhere in San Francisco. Other than that, as long as you carry your scope with you, it's probably fine.

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 8:58 AM Joel Perlstein <joelperl@...> wrote:
I am thinking of visiting Heron’s Head Park later this week, around 4 pm.  I will be driving to the parking lot and then traveling by foot. I will be by myself. I am a man in my early 70’s and will have an expensive binoculars and scope with me. Do you think that would be reasonably safe?

 Thanks for whatever insight you can provide. 
--
Joel Perlstein 
San Francisco



--
Elliotte Rusty Harold
elharo@...



--
Janet Carpinelli
Manager Volunteer Services
Golden Gate Audubon Society


Shorebird Atlas

World Shorebirds Day
 

Hi All,


The Shorebird Conservation Society has launched its first global program, the Shorebird Atlas, aiming to map the distribution, habitats and threats of breeding shorebirds on a global level. The 5 years-long program starts this coming breeding season in the Northern Hemisphere. The survey site registration is now open and I encourage you to support this program. Registration is necessary to allocate the UTM grid to the contributor's survey location.

Please learn more about the program at https://www.shorebirdconservation.org/shorebird-atlas 


Should you have any questions, please send us an email to shorebirdconservationsociety@... address.

Please look after yourself. 


Best wishes, Szimi


Re: Ft. Mason - Two rubers?

Anna Klafter
 

Hi Richard- Can I ask where you saw the oriole? I was thinking of trying to go look this afternoon. 

Thanks
Anna


On Feb 25, 2021, at 2:12 PM, Richard Bradus via groups.io <grizzledjay@...> wrote:


Or intergrades??

Late this morning (Feb. 25) at Fort Mason while straining to find the Baltimore Oriole - which was eventually sighted - the appearance of two Red-breasted Sapsuckers at the same time raised some interesting questions.

The confiding bird identified by many as of the ruber subspecies was easily and repeatedly seen in the usual spot working its sap wells in a pittosporum near the tennis courts. It shows extensive red on the breast with a bit of yellowish coloration below. However, I am puzzled by the back, as the parallel rows of spots appear rather prominent and clearly whitish to me, not narrow and yellowish as is generally described in the guides. At the same time, another Red-breasted was seen working one of the large eucs at the south lawn near the General's House. This bird also showed an essentially all red head with red extending well down on the breast. I was unable to get a good long look at the back of this bird, but it also appeared to have whitish spots (though less prominent than on the first bird). And, yes, there were definitely two different birds as multiple observers saw them in the two locations at the same time.

So, do we have two different ruber subspecies Red-breasted at Fort Mason? Is the back pattern consistent with or within the range of variation expected for this subspecies? Or are these birds actually not "pure" representatives of the subspecies? - bearing in mind the common interbreeding and variation seen among both Red-breasted and Red-naped in the Pacific Northwest and elsewhere, I would not be surprised by various degrees of "intergrade" individuals.

Any opinions or clarification would be welcome.

BTW, the Red Bishop also continues in the Community Garden although the feeder in the center of the garden has been taken down (presumably to prevent the plague affecting siskins and the like).

Keeping an open mind,
Richard Bradus
San Francisco


Ft. Mason - Two rubers?

Richard Bradus
 

Or intergrades??

Late this morning (Feb. 25) at Fort Mason while straining to find the Baltimore Oriole - which was eventually sighted - the appearance of two Red-breasted Sapsuckers at the same time raised some interesting questions.

The confiding bird identified by many as of the ruber subspecies was easily and repeatedly seen in the usual spot working its sap wells in a pittosporum near the tennis courts. It shows extensive red on the breast with a bit of yellowish coloration below. However, I am puzzled by the back, as the parallel rows of spots appear rather prominent and clearly whitish to me, not narrow and yellowish as is generally described in the guides. At the same time, another Red-breasted was seen working one of the large eucs at the south lawn near the General's House. This bird also showed an essentially all red head with red extending well down on the breast. I was unable to get a good long look at the back of this bird, but it also appeared to have whitish spots (though less prominent than on the first bird). And, yes, there were definitely two different birds as multiple observers saw them in the two locations at the same time.

So, do we have two different ruber subspecies Red-breasted at Fort Mason? Is the back pattern consistent with or within the range of variation expected for this subspecies? Or are these birds actually not "pure" representatives of the subspecies? - bearing in mind the common interbreeding and variation seen among both Red-breasted and Red-naped in the Pacific Northwest and elsewhere, I would not be surprised by various degrees of "intergrade" individuals.

Any opinions or clarification would be welcome.

BTW, the Red Bishop also continues in the Community Garden although the feeder in the center of the garden has been taken down (presumably to prevent the plague affecting siskins and the like).

Keeping an open mind,
Richard Bradus
San Francisco


Orchard Oriole

Chris Vance
 

Seen now in red Honeysuckle in children’s garden.


Orchard Oriole continuing

Randy Collignon
 
Edited

Just saw Nico's juvenile male ORCHARD ORIOLE at the Botanical Garden - by the Children's Garden in the pond area seen from the path on the western side. 

Randy Collignon
San Francisco Inner Sunset


Orchard Oriole continues in Botanic Gardens in Golden Gate Park

David Assmann
 

The young male ORCHARD ORIOLE found yesterday by Nico in the Children's Garden in the Botanic Gardens continued there this afternoon.

901 - 920 of 26235