Date   

Cassin's vireos in Oak Woodlands @ GGP

Ken Moy
 

Hi all, 2 Cassin's vireos (1 seen, 2 heard) on Oak Woodlands on the wooden box steps leading to Stanyan and Fulton.

Good birding.

Ken Moy


Cassin's vireo by Middle Lake

Loretta
 

Hi Folks,

I saw a Cassin's vireo yesterday morning, around 9:15 am. It was in the tall pines in the meadow south of Middle Lake, directly in front of the parking lot. Two Townsends were foraging in the general area as well.

Clear spectacles, a short rising call.

It flitted around for about 15 minutes, then disappeared. I wasn't able to refind it.

Apologies for the delayed report.

Good birding,

Loretta


California Thrasher continues at Candlestick Park

David Assmann
 

The CALIFORNIA THRASHER found Thursday at Candlestick Park continues this morning.  It was almost at the end of the spit in the south eastern corner of the park.


Re: How safe is it to visit Heron’s Head Park

Janet Carpinelli
 

Hi Elliotte

I walk my dog out there at least once/week often about that time if you want to meet some time. I concur with everyone---perfectly safe to walk, must not leave any valuables (at least not visible) and lock up!


On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 8:12 AM Elliotte Rusty Harold <elharo@...> wrote:
Don't leave anything in your car, trunk included. Break-ins occur regularly here, as they do almost everywhere in San Francisco. Other than that, as long as you carry your scope with you, it's probably fine.

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 8:58 AM Joel Perlstein <joelperl@...> wrote:
I am thinking of visiting Heron’s Head Park later this week, around 4 pm.  I will be driving to the parking lot and then traveling by foot. I will be by myself. I am a man in my early 70’s and will have an expensive binoculars and scope with me. Do you think that would be reasonably safe?

 Thanks for whatever insight you can provide. 
--
Joel Perlstein 
San Francisco



--
Elliotte Rusty Harold
elharo@...



--
Janet Carpinelli
Manager Volunteer Services
Golden Gate Audubon Society


Shorebird Atlas

World Shorebirds Day
 

Hi All,


The Shorebird Conservation Society has launched its first global program, the Shorebird Atlas, aiming to map the distribution, habitats and threats of breeding shorebirds on a global level. The 5 years-long program starts this coming breeding season in the Northern Hemisphere. The survey site registration is now open and I encourage you to support this program. Registration is necessary to allocate the UTM grid to the contributor's survey location.

Please learn more about the program at https://www.shorebirdconservation.org/shorebird-atlas 


Should you have any questions, please send us an email to shorebirdconservationsociety@... address.

Please look after yourself. 


Best wishes, Szimi


Re: Ft. Mason - Two rubers?

Anna Klafter
 

Hi Richard- Can I ask where you saw the oriole? I was thinking of trying to go look this afternoon. 

Thanks
Anna


On Feb 25, 2021, at 2:12 PM, Richard Bradus via groups.io <grizzledjay@...> wrote:


Or intergrades??

Late this morning (Feb. 25) at Fort Mason while straining to find the Baltimore Oriole - which was eventually sighted - the appearance of two Red-breasted Sapsuckers at the same time raised some interesting questions.

The confiding bird identified by many as of the ruber subspecies was easily and repeatedly seen in the usual spot working its sap wells in a pittosporum near the tennis courts. It shows extensive red on the breast with a bit of yellowish coloration below. However, I am puzzled by the back, as the parallel rows of spots appear rather prominent and clearly whitish to me, not narrow and yellowish as is generally described in the guides. At the same time, another Red-breasted was seen working one of the large eucs at the south lawn near the General's House. This bird also showed an essentially all red head with red extending well down on the breast. I was unable to get a good long look at the back of this bird, but it also appeared to have whitish spots (though less prominent than on the first bird). And, yes, there were definitely two different birds as multiple observers saw them in the two locations at the same time.

So, do we have two different ruber subspecies Red-breasted at Fort Mason? Is the back pattern consistent with or within the range of variation expected for this subspecies? Or are these birds actually not "pure" representatives of the subspecies? - bearing in mind the common interbreeding and variation seen among both Red-breasted and Red-naped in the Pacific Northwest and elsewhere, I would not be surprised by various degrees of "intergrade" individuals.

Any opinions or clarification would be welcome.

BTW, the Red Bishop also continues in the Community Garden although the feeder in the center of the garden has been taken down (presumably to prevent the plague affecting siskins and the like).

Keeping an open mind,
Richard Bradus
San Francisco


Ft. Mason - Two rubers?

Richard Bradus
 

Or intergrades??

Late this morning (Feb. 25) at Fort Mason while straining to find the Baltimore Oriole - which was eventually sighted - the appearance of two Red-breasted Sapsuckers at the same time raised some interesting questions.

The confiding bird identified by many as of the ruber subspecies was easily and repeatedly seen in the usual spot working its sap wells in a pittosporum near the tennis courts. It shows extensive red on the breast with a bit of yellowish coloration below. However, I am puzzled by the back, as the parallel rows of spots appear rather prominent and clearly whitish to me, not narrow and yellowish as is generally described in the guides. At the same time, another Red-breasted was seen working one of the large eucs at the south lawn near the General's House. This bird also showed an essentially all red head with red extending well down on the breast. I was unable to get a good long look at the back of this bird, but it also appeared to have whitish spots (though less prominent than on the first bird). And, yes, there were definitely two different birds as multiple observers saw them in the two locations at the same time.

So, do we have two different ruber subspecies Red-breasted at Fort Mason? Is the back pattern consistent with or within the range of variation expected for this subspecies? Or are these birds actually not "pure" representatives of the subspecies? - bearing in mind the common interbreeding and variation seen among both Red-breasted and Red-naped in the Pacific Northwest and elsewhere, I would not be surprised by various degrees of "intergrade" individuals.

Any opinions or clarification would be welcome.

BTW, the Red Bishop also continues in the Community Garden although the feeder in the center of the garden has been taken down (presumably to prevent the plague affecting siskins and the like).

Keeping an open mind,
Richard Bradus
San Francisco


Orchard Oriole

Chris Vance
 

Seen now in red Honeysuckle in children’s garden.


Orchard Oriole continuing

Randy Collignon
 
Edited

Just saw Nico's juvenile male ORCHARD ORIOLE at the Botanical Garden - by the Children's Garden in the pond area seen from the path on the western side. 

Randy Collignon
San Francisco Inner Sunset


Orchard Oriole continues in Botanic Gardens in Golden Gate Park

David Assmann
 

The young male ORCHARD ORIOLE found yesterday by Nico in the Children's Garden in the Botanic Gardens continued there this afternoon.


Re: How safe is it to visit Heron’s Head Park

Siobhan Ruck
 

And if you have a bird-friendly yard at your home, be sure to stop at Bay Natives (across the street) for a really great selection of native plants.  It’s not too late to get a few more natural hummingbird feeders in your yard this year!  

With all the concerns of sick siskins this year, remember that bird-friendly plantings are a good way to bring birds to your yard without clustering them in ways that can lead to disease outbreaks.

Siobhan Ruck


On Feb 23, 2021, at 1:14 AM, Aimee Goggins via groups.io <aimgoggins@...> wrote:

We go regularly at all times of day and there are always other people there—birdwatching, walking, biking, fishing. It feels safe and I frequently see others with binocs, cameras, and scopes. 

Practice usual urban awareness and caution, and enjoy!

On Feb 23, 2021, at 12:58 AM, Joel Perlstein <joelperl@...> wrote:

I am thinking of visiting Heron’s Head Park later this week, around 4 pm.  I will be driving to the parking lot and then traveling by foot. I will be by myself. I am a man in my early 70’s and will have an expensive binoculars and scope with me. Do you think that would be reasonably safe?

 Thanks for whatever insight you can provide. 
--
Joel Perlstein 
San Francisco


Re: How safe is it to visit Heron’s Head Park

Elliotte Rusty Harold
 

Don't leave anything in your car, trunk included. Break-ins occur regularly here, as they do almost everywhere in San Francisco. Other than that, as long as you carry your scope with you, it's probably fine.

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 8:58 AM Joel Perlstein <joelperl@...> wrote:
I am thinking of visiting Heron’s Head Park later this week, around 4 pm.  I will be driving to the parking lot and then traveling by foot. I will be by myself. I am a man in my early 70’s and will have an expensive binoculars and scope with me. Do you think that would be reasonably safe?

 Thanks for whatever insight you can provide. 
--
Joel Perlstein 
San Francisco



--
Elliotte Rusty Harold
elharo@...


Re: How safe is it to visit Heron’s Head Park

Aimee Goggins
 

We go regularly at all times of day and there are always other people there—birdwatching, walking, biking, fishing. It feels safe and I frequently see others with binocs, cameras, and scopes. 

Practice usual urban awareness and caution, and enjoy!

On Feb 23, 2021, at 12:58 AM, Joel Perlstein <joelperl@...> wrote:

I am thinking of visiting Heron’s Head Park later this week, around 4 pm.  I will be driving to the parking lot and then traveling by foot. I will be by myself. I am a man in my early 70’s and will have an expensive binoculars and scope with me. Do you think that would be reasonably safe?

 Thanks for whatever insight you can provide. 
--
Joel Perlstein 
San Francisco


How safe is it to visit Heron’s Head Park

Joel Perlstein
 

I am thinking of visiting Heron’s Head Park later this week, around 4 pm.  I will be driving to the parking lot and then traveling by foot. I will be by myself. I am a man in my early 70’s and will have an expensive binoculars and scope with me. Do you think that would be reasonably safe?

 Thanks for whatever insight you can provide. 
--
Joel Perlstein 
San Francisco


Baltimore and Bullock's Orioles at Fort Mason

David Assmann
 

There have been at least two Orioles at Fort Mason since late fall. A  BALTIMORE ORIOLE was found and photographed by John Colbert and Erica Rutherford on New Year's Eve.  The BULLOCK'S ORIOLE has been photographed many times since the fall.  This morning both Orioles were in front of the General's House - at one point chasing each other. Other birds of note - the NORTHERN RED BISHOP has been seen daily since February 3rd at the feeder in the garden.  A RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD was near the Battery on Saturday, and yesterday a PACIFIC LOON swam outside of Aquatic Park.


Re: Continuing Oriole(s)? at Ft Mason*** please read

Brian Fitch
 

Just a quick note to say that both Bullock’s and Baltimore Orioles were seen in the eucs in front of the General’s house at Ft Mason earlier today.  Photos and details coming soon from others.  Thanks for the heads up Lucas.

And some of those photo folks found that the White-winged Scoter is a young male.
Brian Fitch

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 7:59 AM Lucas Stephenson via groups.io <Navigator44=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
It appears that a Baltimore Oriole has been photographed at the Ft. Mason Gardens for the past 3 months or so. The bird has showed features of an oranger belly, oranger face, lacking grayish tones anywhere on the body looks like a perfect match to me for a Baltimore. I have found a new appreciation for reviewers asking for photos every time a rarity has been posted. Would be awesome if some more people could gather some more photos as the bird has likely been here all winter. The bird has molted into a more obvious baltimore “type” plumage. The bird hasn’t been photographed as a bullocks since december 6th before the february 7th and 20 images.
The best,
Lucas Stephenson






Re: W-w Scoter again

Ken Moy
 

Just sighted in raft of surf scoters @ Baker Beach, white wing patch clearly visible and appears larger than adjacent female surf scoters.


On Mon, Feb 22, 2021, 8:01 AM Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:
She’s sitting on the water off of Baker Beach, visible from the Battery Godfrey bluffs.
Brian Fitch


W-w Scoter again

Brian Fitch
 

She’s sitting on the water off of Baker Beach, visible from the Battery Godfrey bluffs.
Brian Fitch


Continuing Oriole(s)? at Ft Mason*** please read

Lucas Stephenson
 

It appears that a Baltimore Oriole has been photographed at the Ft. Mason Gardens for the past 3 months or so. The bird has showed features of an oranger belly, oranger face, lacking grayish tones anywhere on the body looks like a perfect match to me for a Baltimore. I have found a new appreciation for reviewers asking for photos every time a rarity has been posted. Would be awesome if some more people could gather some more photos as the bird has likely been here all winter. The bird has molted into a more obvious baltimore “type” plumage. The bird hasn’t been photographed as a bullocks since december 6th before the february 7th and 20 images.
The best,
Lucas Stephenson


Mountain Bluebird @ Battery Godfrey, 2/21/21

Paul Saraceni
 

This morning I spent several hours up on Battery Godfrey. There were intermittent, light NE winds, but not enough to produce a movement of waterfowl.
 
Western Bluebirds were on the move early this morning and I observed at least 15 in groups of 5 / 3 / 3 / 2  + several singles. Some of these birds were high-flying and appeared to continue on their way, either S or N over the Bay.
 
One group of 3 bluebirds very briefly landed on the utility pole & wires just behind (E of) the Battery and N of the old building adjacent to the parking lot, around 7:40 AM. I managed a photograph of one of them just before they took off and flew E in the general direction of Ft. Scott, not to return again to BG while I was present. On uploading the photo when I returned home, I confirmed my quick impression -- a MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD, showing overall blue plumage, especially on its upperparts, no rusty color, longish primary projection and tail, and a thin, pointy bill.  From my quick look at the perched group the other 2 appeared to be Western Bluebirds.   Other bluebirds that I managed to photograph in flight early this morning were Westerns.  Perhaps this is the individual observed by Hugh Cotter and I as a calling flyover @ BG on 1/23, but not since then, or another in the small coastal movement this winter.
 
I will post the photo later today in an ebird report.
 
Other observations at the Battery this morning included a Merlin, 35 Band-tailed Pigeons, and single Tree and Violet-green  Swallows.
 
Paul Saraceni
San Francisco 
 

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