Date   

Escapee? Ring-necked Pheasant male GGHeights Park!

Trace K
 

Odd sighting!  Spotted just before 9am on Quintara. Last seen at Q x 12th Ave, heading up & into Golden Gates Hts Park thru the overgrown, steep slope on the Southern edge of the park.

Trace K

 


Herring run at AT&T Park right now

Josiah Clark
 

Probably one of the best opportunities to look at gulls in the city all year.

Josiah Clark | Habitat Potential | Consulting Ecologist | 415.317.3978
License #1043929


Summer Tanager at Fort Mason

David Assmann
 

Young male in Community Garden ECS


Hammond's flycatcher continues at Moscone Playground

Michele Liapes
 

I hadn't seen it, or other reports on it for a while, but stopped by Moscone today on an off-chance, and and so was surprised to see it still  here, actively foraging between the usual pine and fence. At one point, it appeared to be flexing (perhaps exercising?) the drooping left wing, and emitted a sharp high call each time it did. But it still seems to be maneuvering as well as ever.  I watched it for close to an hour from about 1 - 2 pm.  
 
Michele Liapes
San Francisco  


Presidio ramble

David Armstrong
 

68 species observed on a leisurely hike from Inspiration Point down to Crissy and back through Fort Scott. Highlights were the continuing Least Flycatcher (usual spot) and Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker (seen in the eucs near the corner of W. Pacific and Arguello), 3 different Spotted Towhees, 2 Wilson's Snipe at Crissy, a Lincoln's Sparrow at the cemetery, Pine Siskins in several locations, and a surprise Bullock's Oriole that I first heard chattering then briefly saw at the Lover's Lane bridge.

David Armstrong


Western Bluebirds at Fort Mason Community Garden

Taylor Lapeyre
 

A quiet evening at the garden this afternoon (except for the parrots), but some kind folks told me that they noticed a pair of Western Bluebirds that were searching for a nesting area across Pope Rd. Sure enough, there was one in a tree that let me have a nice look. Thought I'd pass along the info.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S79299702

I also noticed that many of the birds I saw, especially one Ruby-Crowned Kinglet, had concerning amounts of feather damage from eucalyptus sap around their beaks. It looked like it couldn't be comfortable. Those eucalyptus trees are always busy.

Good birding,

Taylor


Pier 94 and Fort Mason Local Interest

David Assmann
 

At least one of the GADWALLS was on the Hanson Pond at Pier 94 this morning.  One of the wigeons looked like an AMERICAN x EURASIAN WIGEON.  The RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER that I've been seeing at Fort Mason looks like the Northern Subspecies, not the commonly seen Southern Subspecies.




Re: Ocean Beach Shorebird

Peter Pyle
 

I first observed it in March 2020
https://ebird.org/checklist/S66295358
as well as this past fall. P

At 11:54 AM 1/14/2021, PAUL SARACENI wrote:
Brian's photos caused me to jog my memory as well -- I looked back at my photo archive and have photos of what is likely the same, distinctive LB Curlew from 12/22/19 on the beach near the south end of the Great Highway. Will put into eBirds and share link later.

Paul Saraceni
San Francisco
On 01/14/2021 11:43 AM Peter Pyle <ppyle@birdpop.org> wrote:


Hi Brian and all-

I've referred to this individual as a "Short-billed Long-billed Curlew" It has been on Funston Beach since August or so. I posted some photos to eBird which I can link up later. It certainly gives an interesting first impression, but just a bird with some sort of bill deformity.

Good birding, Peter

On Jan 14, 2021, at 11:12, Brian Fitch <fogeggs@gmail.com> wrote:

Seen this morning around Lawton. I don't think I'm looking for an ID, but am interested in whether others have seen such a bill shape before. This is my first photo post on the list, so I hope it works.
Brian Fitch
<P1020133.jpg>

<P1020128.jpg>


Lake Merced loop: Tree Swallows, Bluebirds, probable LT weasel

Eddie Bartley
 

Jan. 14: Noreen and I met a non-birder friends at the Boathouse, for the 3 mile walk around the lakes, which is 5.48 miles per eBird if you use the concrete bridge cut-off.

Began by walking down the sloped drive to the north shore of the south lake, lot's of passerine activity. Right away Noreen saw what she is fairly sure was a Long-tailed Weasel run across the lane and into the marsh. Dang, I missed it. But a park staff dude saw it too, asked if anyone knew what that animal was and when Noreen suggested weasel he thought that seemed right. Anyone else see LT weasel here before?

Lot's of the usual critters (we were mostly socializing) but when we got to the wooden bridge just north of the Harding Golf course we tried to count Tree Swallows above the course, 8 to 12 best guess, also Western Bluebirds calling. 

Happy Trails!

Eddie Bartley


Re: Ocean Beach Shorebird

Paul Saraceni
 

Brian's photos caused me to jog my memory as well -- I looked back at my photo archive and have photos of what is likely the same, distinctive LB Curlew from 12/22/19 on the beach near the south end of the Great Highway.  Will put into eBirds and share link later.
 
Paul Saraceni
San Francisco

On 01/14/2021 11:43 AM Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi Brian and all-
 
I’ve referred to this individual as a ‘Short-billed Long-billed Curlew’ It has been on Funston Beach since August or so. I posted some photos to eBird which I can link up later. It certainly gives an interesting first impression, but just a bird with some sort of bill deformity.
 
Good birding, Peter 

On Jan 14, 2021, at 11:12, Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:

Seen this morning around Lawton.  I don't think I'm looking for an ID, but am interested in whether others have seen such a bill shape before.  This is my first photo post on the list, so I hope it works.
Brian Fitch
<P1020133.jpg>
 
<P1020128.jpg>


Re: Ocean Beach Shorebird

Brian Fitch
 

Since August?  Our Balkanized reporting systems strike again.  I'm glad it's moved up to the main beach where it's more accessible.
Brian


On Thu, Jan 14, 2021 at 11:44 AM Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
Hi Brian and all-

I’ve referred to this individual as a ‘Short-billed Long-billed Curlew’ It has been on Funston Beach since August or so. I posted some photos to eBird which I can link up later. It certainly gives an interesting first impression, but just a bird with some sort of bill deformity.

Good birding, Peter 

On Jan 14, 2021, at 11:12, Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:


Seen this morning around Lawton.  I don't think I'm looking for an ID, but am interested in whether others have seen such a bill shape before.  This is my first photo post on the list, so I hope it works.
Brian Fitch
<P1020133.jpg>


<P1020128.jpg>



Re: Ocean Beach Shorebird

Peter Pyle
 

Hi Brian and all-

I’ve referred to this individual as a ‘Short-billed Long-billed Curlew’ It has been on Funston Beach since August or so. I posted some photos to eBird which I can link up later. It certainly gives an interesting first impression, but just a bird with some sort of bill deformity.

Good birding, Peter 

On Jan 14, 2021, at 11:12, Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:


Seen this morning around Lawton.  I don't think I'm looking for an ID, but am interested in whether others have seen such a bill shape before.  This is my first photo post on the list, so I hope it works.
Brian Fitch
<P1020133.jpg>


<P1020128.jpg>



Ocean Beach Shorebird

Brian Fitch
 

Seen this morning around Lawton.  I don't think I'm looking for an ID, but am interested in whether others have seen such a bill shape before.  This is my first photo post on the list, so I hope it works.
Brian FitchP1020133.jpg

P1020128.jpg


Sequoia Audubon Society January Monthly Meeting with Mary Ellen Hannibal!

Davena Gentry
 

"Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird" is one of Wallace Stevens' most beloved poems, taught in many an English class, and accessible even to those who don't love poetry. Given the seasonality of the poem, it is likely Stevens was writing about a Rusty Blackbird, evidently so common as to be taken for granted as part of the scenery. The bird is not given a name, a history, or its own reality outside the mind of the poet.

In this presentation, noted Bay Area author Mary Ellen Hannibal will take a look at Stevens' poem alongside the natural history and current situation of the Rusty Blackbird. Questioning whether Stevens was really looking at a blackbird and not just thinking about one, she will highlight how citizen science helps reveal the deepest truths about the world. She'll discuss how the group mind of citizen science, which aggregates millions of individual observations into discernable patterns, has an emerging poetry all its own. And the blackbird “is involved” in a starring role.

Mary Ellen Hannibal is the author of numerous significant works on the ecology of our times, most prominently Citizen Scientist and The Spine of the Continent. She has been a speaker in the Wallace Stegner Lecture Series with Peninsula Open Space Trust, and delivered a TedTalk on Citizen Science in 2020. She has been a favorite speaker at Sequoia before, and it is an honor to welcome her back.

Sequoia Audubon Society has consistently forefronted the importance of participatory science initiatives like eBird, iNaturalist, and official seasonal Bird Counts. We have also endeavored to make birding multidimensional, understanding how it includes science, art, literature, history, and all dimensions of community. This talk will unite many of these elements.

Please register here: http://www.sequoia-audubon.org/meetings.html

"Socializing" at 6:30, the meeting will start at 7pm! 

 

For those wanting to re-read the Wallace Stevens’ poem in advance -

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45236/thirteen-ways-of-looking-at-a-blackbird


Gray Raily Day & C Merg

Brian Fitch
 

I went to Lake Merced this morning, but the birds were extremely quiet early on.  After sitting out the brief rain under a leafless willow, I went back out onto the northeast corner of the concrete bridge, where the rails came out to play.  A Sora and a Virginia had a short conversation which seemed to work well, as they passed quite close to each other without hostility.  The Sora then climbed up onto the large patch of fallen tules and spent several minutes feeding on them in full view.  At one point it did a quick flap and hop maneuver that I've seen sparrows do when they want something just out of reach, but this was a first for me with rails.  Upon checking the south side of the bridge, another Sora was along the shore there as well. 

Up at the wooden bridge, another Virginia was directly below on the southeast.  But the highlight was the merganser, especially as Common Merganser was the only bird on my "even slightly expectable list" that I did not see in the city last year.  This bird lifted off the water out of view from me and I first saw it flying away low toward the ocean.  It was distant, but the wing patches looked good for Common, and I begged the bird to turn back toward me.  It pulled a U-turn and flew directly toward and over me on the bridge, showing the marks I wanted to see, a female type Common.  It then flew to the far east end of the lake, did another 180, and flew back west at some altitude and then north out of sight.

Brian Fitch


Swainson’s Hawk

Oscar Moss
 

Just viewed a southbound swainson’s hawk from my house. This is an exceptional winter record for San Francisco. It was headed toward the Bernal Heights area. Photos will be posted on eBird later. You never know what might fly over when you take a look up.

Oscar


Re: Deceased Backyard Bird Id?

Kay Voyvodich
 

Thank you for your help. Typically when I find birds I have taken them to the Academy of Science but I gave this little one an honorable burial.


Deceased Backyard Bird Id?

Kay Voyvodich
 

Greetings Sf Birders,

I would like to know if it is ok to post two photos here of a deceased bird I found in my backyard for identification and guesses to cause of death. Rigor mortise had not set in so I was able to photograph the underwing open.

Kay
San Francisco


Re: Requesting help with Bird IDs

tracy_farrington
 

Alex,
I.D.’s look good to me. And I think you’re getting a very good start by applying an analytical approach. Welcome to the rich and rewarding world of birding!
Best,
Tracy Farrington
Walnut Creek


On Jan 12, 2021, at 8:22 AM, Alex Loucks <admail1776@...> wrote:

Hi all,
 
Excited to join the birding world. I'm new to the activity, but have thoroughly enjoyed my interactions with the community thus far.  (Having a terrible time navigating groups.io though! Sorry if you've gotten random posts that make no sense!)
 
In the midst of the pandemic, it's difficult to ID birds since I can't walk around with experts every weekend and absorb, so I'm hoping I can post some photos here and get some confirmations on ID (also shout out to Dawn Lemoine, Whitney Grover, and Keith Maley for their zoom classes!). In particular, I would love to hear the rationale for any IDs relative to similar species, or tips on what field marks to look for when out and about, or how my provided rationale was incorrect.
 
Below I've put my guess and the location/timing, # photos in the set, my rationale, and then what Merlin BirdID suggested it was (used after I came up with my own rationale).
 
(Oh, and by all means tell me if this is an inappropriate place to ask for IDs!)
 
Thank you!!!
Alex Loucks
 
1) Lincoln Sparrow? - Mission Bay, Jan '21 -- 1 photo
My rationale: This sparrow was lighter than the surrounding sparrows that I would classify as song sparrows. The streaking is thin and sharp-edged, not smudgy. It seems like the coloring on the breast is "buffier" than a song sparrow. He ran off before I could get better lighting.
Merlin BirdID app "Photo ID": Suggests it's a Lincoln Sparrow (or one of the sparrows not in the US West Coast pack, which seems unlikely)
 
2) Red-shouldered Hawk? Sacramento NWR, Dec '20 (technically not SF, but I'm hoping you guys can still help me out!) - 1 photo
My rationale: Based on breast pattern/color and tail, I would think Cooper's, Sharp-shinned, or Red-shouldered. Size I would think Red-shouldered. The black tail bands also seem to be too thick to be Cooper's or Sharp-shinned. And there's no dark "cap" on the head. I don't think red-tailed bc of the breast patterning.
Merlin BirdID app "Photo ID": Suggests Red-shouldered Hawk or a RTH
 
3) Savannah Sparrow? - Heron's Head, Jan '21 -- 3 photos
 
 
My rationale: Pretty much the yellow coloring around the eye
Merlin BirdID app "Photo ID": Suggests Savannah or Vesper Sparrow (I don't think it's the Vesper)
 
4) Mallard Hybrid? - Lake Merced, Jan '21 -- 2 photos
My rationale: Looks like a mallard, swims with mallards, acts like a mallard.... but the beak is like that of a scaup, light "blue" with a black tip! The tip doesn't seem to be as extensive as that of a wigeon. The white ring around the neck also seems less marked than the neighboring mallards. But he doesn't look like a scaup or a wigeon to me.
Merlin BirdID app "Photo ID": Suggests Mallard, Greater Scaup, American Wigeon
 
5) Great-tailed Grackle? Lake Merced, Jan '21 -- 2 photos
My rationale: Watched them for awhile; male is black-ish in color, not multi-colored like a common grackle.
Merlin BirdID app "Photo ID": Suggests Great-tailed Grackle
 
Sadly I appear to have photographed every sparrow at Vista Canal except for the swamp sparrow.... maybe next time...

(In case my photo order gets screwed up on attachment...)

3339 - Lincoln Sparrow?
3710 - Red-shouldered Hawk?
3840, 3849, 3847 - Savannah Sparrow?
4267, 4271 - Mallard hybrid?
4287, 4301 - Great-tailed Grackle?
<_DSC3339-Email.jpg>
<_DSC3710-Email.jpg>
<_DSC3840-Email.jpg>
<_DSC3847-Email.jpg>
<_DSC3849-Email.jpg>
<_DSC4267-Email.jpg>
<_DSC4271-Email.jpg>
<_DSC4287-Email.jpg>
<_DSC4301-Email.jpg>


Re: Requesting help with Bird IDs

Alex Loucks
 

Hi all,
 
Excited to join the birding world. I'm new to the activity, but have thoroughly enjoyed my interactions with the community thus far.  (Having a terrible time navigating groups.io though! Sorry if you've gotten random posts that make no sense!)
 
In the midst of the pandemic, it's difficult to ID birds since I can't walk around with experts every weekend and absorb, so I'm hoping I can post some photos here and get some confirmations on ID (also shout out to Dawn Lemoine, Whitney Grover, and Keith Maley for their zoom classes!). In particular, I would love to hear the rationale for any IDs relative to similar species, or tips on what field marks to look for when out and about, or how my provided rationale was incorrect.
 
Below I've put my guess and the location/timing, # photos in the set, my rationale, and then what Merlin BirdID suggested it was (used after I came up with my own rationale).
 
(Oh, and by all means tell me if this is an inappropriate place to ask for IDs!)
 
Thank you!!!
Alex Loucks
 
1) Lincoln Sparrow? - Mission Bay, Jan '21 -- 1 photo
My rationale: This sparrow was lighter than the surrounding sparrows that I would classify as song sparrows. The streaking is thin and sharp-edged, not smudgy. It seems like the coloring on the breast is "buffier" than a song sparrow. He ran off before I could get better lighting.
Merlin BirdID app "Photo ID": Suggests it's a Lincoln Sparrow (or one of the sparrows not in the US West Coast pack, which seems unlikely)
 
2) Red-shouldered Hawk? Sacramento NWR, Dec '20 (technically not SF, but I'm hoping you guys can still help me out!) - 1 photo
My rationale: Based on breast pattern/color and tail, I would think Cooper's, Sharp-shinned, or Red-shouldered. Size I would think Red-shouldered. The black tail bands also seem to be too thick to be Cooper's or Sharp-shinned. And there's no dark "cap" on the head. I don't think red-tailed bc of the breast patterning.
Merlin BirdID app "Photo ID": Suggests Red-shouldered Hawk or a RTH
 
3) Savannah Sparrow? - Heron's Head, Jan '21 -- 3 photos
 
 
My rationale: Pretty much the yellow coloring around the eye
Merlin BirdID app "Photo ID": Suggests Savannah or Vesper Sparrow (I don't think it's the Vesper)
 
4) Mallard Hybrid? - Lake Merced, Jan '21 -- 2 photos
My rationale: Looks like a mallard, swims with mallards, acts like a mallard.... but the beak is like that of a scaup, light "blue" with a black tip! The tip doesn't seem to be as extensive as that of a wigeon. The white ring around the neck also seems less marked than the neighboring mallards. But he doesn't look like a scaup or a wigeon to me.
Merlin BirdID app "Photo ID": Suggests Mallard, Greater Scaup, American Wigeon
 
5) Great-tailed Grackle? Lake Merced, Jan '21 -- 2 photos
My rationale: Watched them for awhile; male is black-ish in color, not multi-colored like a common grackle.
Merlin BirdID app "Photo ID": Suggests Great-tailed Grackle
 
Sadly I appear to have photographed every sparrow at Vista Canal except for the swamp sparrow.... maybe next time...

(In case my photo order gets screwed up on attachment...)

3339 - Lincoln Sparrow?
3710 - Red-shouldered Hawk?
3840, 3849, 3847 - Savannah Sparrow?
4267, 4271 - Mallard hybrid?
4287, 4301 - Great-tailed Grackle?

681 - 700 of 25896