Date   

locked Re: Warbler in Blackface

Rudyard Wallen
 

Thank you Melissa

-Rudy


On Wed, Jan 6, 2021 at 1:10 PM Melissa Ramos <mramos@...> wrote:
Blackface is a term used to describe a racist act of pretending to be Black. This is an offensive term to use regarding birds. Please do not use this type of language to describe birds or the natural environment. And please be more aware of the impact of your language and word choices. This bird is not in “blackface.” There are other ways to describe the bird’s appearance that do not have racist connotations. 

Thank you. 

On Wednesday, January 6, 2021, Maureen Lahiff via groups.io <MLahiff=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I concur that the black residue is likely from feeding in eucalyptus flowers. There may other resinous plants that an also lead to this.

Contrary to myth, this is not likely to endanger the bird's health.


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Bradus via groups.io <grizzledjay=yahoo.com@groups.io>
To: SFBirds <sfbirds@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Jan 6, 2021 12:50 pm
Subject: [SFBirds] Warbler in Blackface

Hi all

Late morning visit to El Polin cut short by the rain. While there I heard a sharp chip call repeated a few times and found this generally yellow warbler gleaning in the brush, mostly hidden in the vegetation. On a side view I assumed it was an Orange-crowned, but then I got a look at the face and was surprised and confused by the black front. I believe it is one messed up Orange-crowned, with the face blackened by eucalyptus gum (or other), but I would appreciate any opinions.

Thanks!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco


Photos:
Inline image

Inline image

Inline image



--
Melissa Ramos
Communications Manager
Golden Gate Audubon Society 

Inspiring people to protect Bay Area birds since 1917.


locked Re: Warbler in Blackface

Melissa Ramos <mramos@...>
 

Blackface is a term used to describe a racist act of pretending to be Black. This is an offensive term to use regarding birds. Please do not use this type of language to describe birds or the natural environment. And please be more aware of the impact of your language and word choices. This bird is not in “blackface.” There are other ways to describe the bird’s appearance that do not have racist connotations. 

Thank you. 


On Wednesday, January 6, 2021, Maureen Lahiff via groups.io <MLahiff=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I concur that the black residue is likely from feeding in eucalyptus flowers. There may other resinous plants that an also lead to this.

Contrary to myth, this is not likely to endanger the bird's health.


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Bradus via groups.io <grizzledjay=yahoo.com@groups.io>
To: SFBirds <sfbirds@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Jan 6, 2021 12:50 pm
Subject: [SFBirds] Warbler in Blackface

Hi all

Late morning visit to El Polin cut short by the rain. While there I heard a sharp chip call repeated a few times and found this generally yellow warbler gleaning in the brush, mostly hidden in the vegetation. On a side view I assumed it was an Orange-crowned, but then I got a look at the face and was surprised and confused by the black front. I believe it is one messed up Orange-crowned, with the face blackened by eucalyptus gum (or other), but I would appreciate any opinions.

Thanks!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco


Photos:
Inline image

Inline image

Inline image



--
Melissa Ramos
Communications Manager
Golden Gate Audubon Society 

Inspiring people to protect Bay Area birds since 1917.


locked Re: Warbler in Blackface

Maureen Lahiff
 

I concur that the black residue is likely from feeding in eucalyptus flowers. There may other resinous plants that an also lead to this.

Contrary to myth, this is not likely to endanger the bird's health.


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Bradus via groups.io <grizzledjay@...>
To: SFBirds <sfbirds@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Jan 6, 2021 12:50 pm
Subject: [SFBirds] Warbler in Blackface

Hi all

Late morning visit to El Polin cut short by the rain. While there I heard a sharp chip call repeated a few times and found this generally yellow warbler gleaning in the brush, mostly hidden in the vegetation. On a side view I assumed it was an Orange-crowned, but then I got a look at the face and was surprised and confused by the black front. I believe it is one messed up Orange-crowned, with the face blackened by eucalyptus gum (or other), but I would appreciate any opinions.

Thanks!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco


Photos:
Inline image

Inline image

Inline image


locked Warbler in Blackface

Richard Bradus
 

Hi all

Late morning visit to El Polin cut short by the rain. While there I heard a sharp chip call repeated a few times and found this generally yellow warbler gleaning in the brush, mostly hidden in the vegetation. On a side view I assumed it was an Orange-crowned, but then I got a look at the face and was surprised and confused by the black front. I believe it is one messed up Orange-crowned, with the face blackened by eucalyptus gum (or other), but I would appreciate any opinions.

Thanks!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco


Photos:
Inline image

Inline image

Inline image


Re: "Costa's" Hummingbird - an F2 hybrid?

Peter Pyle
 

California Bird Records Committee has been wrestling with this interesting question. Lately it has regarded Blue-winged Warblers in the state, few of which seem absolutely "pure," especially if phenotypically "pure" individuals may (or even likely) have genes from the alternate species. I've been advocating for a 7/8th threshold to consider an individual pure, e.g., F3 with 7 of 8 grandparents of one species. This would of course still involve a judgement call but it seems to be a better line to draw than one we can't even see.

Speaking of HERG x GWGU, SF birders, there was a good mixed gull flock this morning across from the SF Water Treatment Plant on Great Highway. Dominated by GWGU but many HERGs, some THGUs, and I'd say at minimum 5-6 HERG x GWGUs, likely more.

Good birding,

Peter

At 10:10 AM 1/6/2021, Adam Winer wrote:


On Wed, Jan 6, 2021 at 9:57 AM Alvaro Jaramillo <<mailto:chucao@...>chucao@...> wrote:

Adam et al.

Fascinating! But it proposes a philosophical question. What is pure? A large proportion of Townsend's Warblers have Hermit Warbler mtDNA from historical swamping of the northern portion of the historical range of Hermit (which went into Canada). Similarly many populations of western White-crowned Sparrows share identical mtDNA with Golden-crowns. And lets not even get into the gulls! So given that eBird requires you check a box and add a number, and people’s lists require that only "full species" be counted. What is the cut-off for what is acceptable on a list? I mean if you want to get strict about it, I bet that a sizeable number of the Thayer’s Gulls (Iceland now) reported in the state are likely hybrid Herring x Glaucous-winged, as that is not a bird that is on most people's radar. By sizeable, who knows maybe a quarter of them???? If you expand it to gene pools, as good species, there are many a good species which incorporate genes from adjacent species, are of hybrid origin, or have a bit of rogue DNA running around (I forget how much Neanderthal DNA I have from the 23andme results, but it is sizeable compared to the average population, and anyone who knows me would have predicted that).

     I don’t think there is an answer, but it is worth pondering. But if anyone is looking for absolutes, and “purityâ€&#65533; perhaps anything associated with biology and the real living world is not the place to be looking for that 😊.


Oh, absolutely - any notion that hybrids are "lesser" is silly, and should have last been acceptable around the time of Plato. I also surmise that once we get past very well-known phenotypes like "Brewster's" Warbler (or chicks seen emerging from mixed parentage nests), that these hybrid IDs are (at best) highly educated guesses, particularly when we're defining endpoints for "this is pure" and "that is not".

I'm also relieved that I had a female/immature Costa's Hummingbird on Mt. Davidson a few years back. So I don't need to worry about my city list here. I'm confident that was a pure Costa's because [STATIC, RECORDING ENDS].

More seriously, I've learned a lot more than I would have with an unambiguously pure Costa's. But now I have to figure out what to tell my kiddo to do with their lifer "Costa's" Hummingbird!

-- Adam


Alvaro

Â

Alvaro Jaramillo

<mailto:alvaro@...>alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

Â

From: <mailto:SFBirds@groups.io>SFBirds@groups.io <<mailto:SFBirds@groups.io>SFBirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Adam Winer
Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2021 9:29 AM
To: SF Birds <<mailto:sfbirds@groups.io>sfbirds@groups.io>
Subject: [SFBirds] "Costa's" Hummingbird - an F2 hybrid?

Â

An update on my backyard hummingbird!

Â

First off, it's still present today, and apparently is also being seen at hummingbird feeders at a home backing onto the "wild" area at the intersection of Cesar Chavez and Noe. I have no idea about actual public access to that plot of land, and you're looking into people's homes, so great care is needed if anyone tries via that path.

Â

Second, and more interestingly, the identification of this bird has gotten really interesting. There's a long discussion on Facebook (<https://www.facebook.com/groups/357272384368972/permalink/3535773546518824/>https://www.facebook.com/groups/357272384368972/permalink/3535773546518824/) but to summarize things that have been discovered since I first posted:
This bird gives both Costa's and Anna's Hummingbird songs. It's worth pointing out that this alone does not prove it's a hybrid, as hummingbirds (and specifically Costa's and Anna's Hummingbirds) can and do learn songs even as adults. But It's perhaps unprecedented to have one bird singing both!
This bird, in some lights, shows a very pink cast to the gorget (though at other times is glowing purple.) I've attached one such pink photo to this email, which also shows tail structure very well - there's others on eBird. (The question of "how pink is too pink" is still open.)
David Rankin (who's specifically studied Anna's x Costa's hybrids at UC Riverside) wrote "The tail feather shape seems very Costa’s-like, but r4 and r3 seem a bit thicker than normal. The gorget color is hard to interpret. I like this as a f2 backcross with Costa’s (3/4 Costa’s, 1/4 Anna’s).".

Â

This is all fairly mind-blowing - what are the odds that the first "Costa's" male in ages is a hybrid with 3 Costa's grandparents?!? And what does it say about the previous records of female/immature Costa's in SF? (I can't fathom an F2 female/immature being identifiable, and an F1 would be an enormous challenge if feasible.)

Â

Big thanks to some of the birders (Ethan Monk, Lucas Stephenson, Jonah Benningfield, to name a few) who took a look at the pictures of this bird (or listened to it in the field) and saw "something is off".

Â

If anyone encounters this bird in the field, please do try to get as much audio of it as possible (ideally accompanied with some photos so we know it really is *this* bird).

Â

Cheers,

Adam Winer

SF, CA

Â

[]



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Content-Disposition: inline; filename="image001.jpg"
Content-ID: <176d8dac6a64ce8e91>
X-Attachment-Id: 176d8dac6a64ce8e91


Re: "Costa's" Hummingbird - an F2 hybrid?

Adam Winer
 



On Wed, Jan 6, 2021 at 9:57 AM Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao@...> wrote:

Adam et al.

  Fascinating! But it proposes a philosophical question. What is pure? A large proportion of Townsend’s Warblers have Hermit Warbler mtDNA from historical swamping of the northern portion of the historical range of Hermit (which went into Canada). Similarly many populations of western White-crowned Sparrows share identical mtDNA with Golden-crowns. And lets not even get into the gulls! So given that eBird requires you check a box and add a number, and people’s lists require that only “full species” be counted. What is the cut-off for what is acceptable on a list? I mean if you want to get strict about it, I bet that a sizeable number of the Thayer’s Gulls (Iceland now) reported in the state are likely hybrid Herring x Glaucous-winged, as that is not a bird that is on most people’s radar. By sizeable, who knows maybe a quarter of them???? If you expand it to gene pools, as good species, there are many a good species which incorporate genes from adjacent species, are of hybrid origin, or have a bit of rogue DNA running around (I forget how much Neanderthal DNA I have from the 23andme results, but it is sizeable compared to the average population, and anyone who knows me would have predicted that).

     I don’t think there is an answer, but it is worth pondering. But if anyone is looking for absolutes, and “purity” perhaps anything associated with biology and the real living world is not the place to be looking for that 😊.


Oh, absolutely - any notion that hybrids are "lesser" is silly, and should have last been acceptable around the time of Plato.  I also surmise that once we get past very well-known phenotypes like "Brewster's" Warbler (or chicks seen emerging from mixed parentage nests), that these hybrid IDs are (at best) highly educated guesses, particularly when we're defining endpoints for "this is pure" and "that is not".

I'm also relieved that I had a female/immature Costa's Hummingbird on Mt. Davidson a few years back. So I don't need to worry about my city list here.  I'm confident that was a pure Costa's because [STATIC, RECORDING ENDS].

More seriously, I've learned a lot more than I would have with an unambiguously pure Costa's.  But now I have to figure out what to tell my kiddo to do with their lifer "Costa's" Hummingbird!

-- Adam


Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: SFBirds@groups.io <SFBirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Adam Winer
Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2021 9:29 AM
To: SF Birds <sfbirds@groups.io>
Subject: [SFBirds] "Costa's" Hummingbird - an F2 hybrid?

 

An update on my backyard hummingbird!

 

First off, it's still present today, and apparently is also being seen at hummingbird feeders at a home backing onto the "wild" area at the intersection of Cesar Chavez and Noe.  I have no idea about actual public access to that plot of land, and you're looking into people's homes, so great care is needed if anyone tries via that path.

 

Second, and more interestingly, the identification of this bird has gotten really interesting.  There's a long discussion on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/groups/357272384368972/permalink/3535773546518824/) but to summarize things that have been discovered since I first posted:

  • This bird gives both Costa's and Anna's Hummingbird songs.  It's worth pointing out that this alone does not prove it's a hybrid, as hummingbirds (and specifically Costa's and Anna's Hummingbirds) can and do learn songs even as adults.  But It's perhaps unprecedented to have one bird singing both!
  • This bird, in some lights, shows a very pink cast to the gorget (though at other times is glowing purple.)  I've attached one such pink photo to this email, which also shows tail structure very well - there's others on eBird.  (The question of "how pink is too pink" is still open.)

David Rankin (who's specifically studied Anna's x Costa's hybrids at UC Riverside) wrote "The tail feather shape seems very Costa’s-like, but r4 and r3 seem a bit thicker than normal. The gorget color is hard to interpret. I like this as a f2 backcross with Costa’s (3/4 Costa’s, 1/4 Anna’s).".

 

This is all fairly mind-blowing - what are the odds that the first "Costa's" male in ages is a hybrid with 3 Costa's grandparents?!?  And what does it say about the previous records of female/immature Costa's in SF?  (I can't fathom an F2 female/immature being identifiable, and an F1 would be an enormous challenge if feasible.)

 

Big thanks to some of the birders (Ethan Monk, Lucas Stephenson, Jonah Benningfield, to name a few) who took a look at the pictures of this bird (or listened to it in the field) and saw "something is off".

 

If anyone encounters this bird in the field, please do try to get as much audio of it as possible (ideally accompanied with some photos so we know it really is *this* bird).

 

Cheers,

Adam Winer

SF, CA

 


Re: "Costa's" Hummingbird - an F2 hybrid?

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Adam et al.

  Fascinating! But it proposes a philosophical question. What is pure? A large proportion of Townsend’s Warblers have Hermit Warbler mtDNA from historical swamping of the northern portion of the historical range of Hermit (which went into Canada). Similarly many populations of western White-crowned Sparrows share identical mtDNA with Golden-crowns. And lets not even get into the gulls! So given that eBird requires you check a box and add a number, and people’s lists require that only “full species” be counted. What is the cut-off for what is acceptable on a list? I mean if you want to get strict about it, I bet that a sizeable number of the Thayer’s Gulls (Iceland now) reported in the state are likely hybrid Herring x Glaucous-winged, as that is not a bird that is on most people’s radar. By sizeable, who knows maybe a quarter of them???? If you expand it to gene pools, as good species, there are many a good species which incorporate genes from adjacent species, are of hybrid origin, or have a bit of rogue DNA running around (I forget how much Neanderthal DNA I have from the 23andme results, but it is sizeable compared to the average population, and anyone who knows me would have predicted that).

     I don’t think there is an answer, but it is worth pondering. But if anyone is looking for absolutes, and “purity” perhaps anything associated with biology and the real living world is not the place to be looking for that 😊.

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: SFBirds@groups.io <SFBirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Adam Winer
Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2021 9:29 AM
To: SF Birds <sfbirds@groups.io>
Subject: [SFBirds] "Costa's" Hummingbird - an F2 hybrid?

 

An update on my backyard hummingbird!

 

First off, it's still present today, and apparently is also being seen at hummingbird feeders at a home backing onto the "wild" area at the intersection of Cesar Chavez and Noe.  I have no idea about actual public access to that plot of land, and you're looking into people's homes, so great care is needed if anyone tries via that path.

 

Second, and more interestingly, the identification of this bird has gotten really interesting.  There's a long discussion on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/groups/357272384368972/permalink/3535773546518824/) but to summarize things that have been discovered since I first posted:

  • This bird gives both Costa's and Anna's Hummingbird songs.  It's worth pointing out that this alone does not prove it's a hybrid, as hummingbirds (and specifically Costa's and Anna's Hummingbirds) can and do learn songs even as adults.  But It's perhaps unprecedented to have one bird singing both!
  • This bird, in some lights, shows a very pink cast to the gorget (though at other times is glowing purple.)  I've attached one such pink photo to this email, which also shows tail structure very well - there's others on eBird.  (The question of "how pink is too pink" is still open.)

David Rankin (who's specifically studied Anna's x Costa's hybrids at UC Riverside) wrote "The tail feather shape seems very Costa’s-like, but r4 and r3 seem a bit thicker than normal. The gorget color is hard to interpret. I like this as a f2 backcross with Costa’s (3/4 Costa’s, 1/4 Anna’s).".

 

This is all fairly mind-blowing - what are the odds that the first "Costa's" male in ages is a hybrid with 3 Costa's grandparents?!?  And what does it say about the previous records of female/immature Costa's in SF?  (I can't fathom an F2 female/immature being identifiable, and an F1 would be an enormous challenge if feasible.)

 

Big thanks to some of the birders (Ethan Monk, Lucas Stephenson, Jonah Benningfield, to name a few) who took a look at the pictures of this bird (or listened to it in the field) and saw "something is off".

 

If anyone encounters this bird in the field, please do try to get as much audio of it as possible (ideally accompanied with some photos so we know it really is *this* bird).

 

Cheers,

Adam Winer

SF, CA

 


"Costa's" Hummingbird - an F2 hybrid?

Adam Winer
 

An update on my backyard hummingbird!

First off, it's still present today, and apparently is also being seen at hummingbird feeders at a home backing onto the "wild" area at the intersection of Cesar Chavez and Noe.  I have no idea about actual public access to that plot of land, and you're looking into people's homes, so great care is needed if anyone tries via that path.

Second, and more interestingly, the identification of this bird has gotten really interesting.  There's a long discussion on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/groups/357272384368972/permalink/3535773546518824/) but to summarize things that have been discovered since I first posted:
  • This bird gives both Costa's and Anna's Hummingbird songs.  It's worth pointing out that this alone does not prove it's a hybrid, as hummingbirds (and specifically Costa's and Anna's Hummingbirds) can and do learn songs even as adults.  But It's perhaps unprecedented to have one bird singing both!
  • This bird, in some lights, shows a very pink cast to the gorget (though at other times is glowing purple.)  I've attached one such pink photo to this email, which also shows tail structure very well - there's others on eBird.  (The question of "how pink is too pink" is still open.)
David Rankin (who's specifically studied Anna's x Costa's hybrids at UC Riverside) wrote "The tail feather shape seems very Costa’s-like, but r4 and r3 seem a bit thicker than normal. The gorget color is hard to interpret. I like this as a f2 backcross with Costa’s (3/4 Costa’s, 1/4 Anna’s).".

This is all fairly mind-blowing - what are the odds that the first "Costa's" male in ages is a hybrid with 3 Costa's grandparents?!?  And what does it say about the previous records of female/immature Costa's in SF?  (I can't fathom an F2 female/immature being identifiable, and an F1 would be an enormous challenge if feasible.)

Big thanks to some of the birders (Ethan Monk, Lucas Stephenson, Jonah Benningfield, to name a few) who took a look at the pictures of this bird (or listened to it in the field) and saw "something is off".

If anyone encounters this bird in the field, please do try to get as much audio of it as possible (ideally accompanied with some photos so we know it really is *this* bird).

Cheers,
Adam Winer
SF, CA

P1050177.jpg


Re: Hammonds continues at Moscone

Richard Bradus
 

Need to clarify a couple of things:

The Moscone Softball Fields are the ones in the Marina (not the diMaggio playground in North Beach); eBird Hotspot: https://ebird.org/hotspot/L13091031

Also, reviewing photos of the Hammond's, it appears that the left wing is still not quite right as the bird sometimes holds it out slightly unfurled, though perhaps not as much as when first seen. In any case, it appears to be coping adequately, and giving quite a few people a nice show. As for the White-eye.... perhaps it is just laying low - I haven't given up hope!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco



On Tuesday, January 5, 2021, 1:54:45 PM PST, Richard Bradus <grizzledjay@...> wrote:


Hi all

To the benefit of a MOB that showed up after noon, the Hammond's Flycatcher was again seen along the north side fence at Moscone Playing Fields in North Beach after the sun came out, flycatching repeatedly from the fence and sometimes perching in the lower reaches of the large eucalyptus and other trees along the north edge. Its wing appears to be healed or improved, now nearly symmetric (and showing the characteristic long primary projection), and it did not appear to have any difficulty flying or hawking. Thankfully the many active Yellow-rumps did not hassle it today.

I had no luck - again - with the White-eye, unfortunately. As a poor consolation, there was a very bright yellow Lesser Goldfinch male, and a considerable amount of plumage variation among the large White-crowned flock; one partially leucitic with white edged wings and lower back, one with a gray mantle, and one with a very white throat but none of the other features of a White-throated. Also one of the Townsend's had a very pale mask, making it look a bit like a Hermit Warbler at first glance.

Have fun and keep looking up!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco


Hammonds continues at Moscone

Richard Bradus
 

Hi all

To the benefit of a MOB that showed up after noon, the Hammond's Flycatcher was again seen along the north side fence at Moscone Playing Fields in North Beach after the sun came out, flycatching repeatedly from the fence and sometimes perching in the lower reaches of the large eucalyptus and other trees along the north edge. Its wing appears to be healed or improved, now nearly symmetric (and showing the characteristic long primary projection), and it did not appear to have any difficulty flying or hawking. Thankfully the many active Yellow-rumps did not hassle it today.

I had no luck - again - with the White-eye, unfortunately. As a poor consolation, there was a very bright yellow Lesser Goldfinch male, and a considerable amount of plumage variation among the large White-crowned flock; one partially leucitic with white edged wings and lower back, one with a gray mantle, and one with a very white throat but none of the other features of a White-throated. Also one of the Townsend's had a very pale mask, making it look a bit like a Hermit Warbler at first glance.

Have fun and keep looking up!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco


Re: Costa's Hummingbird, Noe Valley 1/4

Adam Winer
 

The Costa's Hummingbird continued, albeit with long absences - last seen around 3pm.  Better pictures obtained:

P1040032-2.jpg


On Mon, Jan 4, 2021 at 1:14 PM Adam Winer <awiner@...> wrote:
In a break in the rain, there was a flurry of activity out back of our home - the usual sparrows and warblers and kinglet, and a Nuttall's Woodpecker and Northern Flicker joining.  I took a glance at a hummingbird perched in a neighboring yard and was more than a bit surprised to see a squat bird, gleaming purple gorget, flared at the sides.

So, yup, adult male Costa's Hummingbird.  It flew off to the east after a few minutes, then returned 10 minutes later.  Got some poor photos, the best of which is attached below.  I don't see any winter records for SF in eBird, and there isn't one on Mark Eaton's SF checklist.

Unfortunately, there's zero way to see this bird from any public location, and even if it proves regular (I assume it's overwintering), I can't invite people in to see it these days.  If someone's desperate, they might try exploring Noe Street between Cesar Chavez and 27th in the hopes of encountering it there.

-- Adam Winer

P1040060.jpg


Costa's Hummingbird, Noe Valley 1/4

Adam Winer
 

In a break in the rain, there was a flurry of activity out back of our home - the usual sparrows and warblers and kinglet, and a Nuttall's Woodpecker and Northern Flicker joining.  I took a glance at a hummingbird perched in a neighboring yard and was more than a bit surprised to see a squat bird, gleaming purple gorget, flared at the sides.

So, yup, adult male Costa's Hummingbird.  It flew off to the east after a few minutes, then returned 10 minutes later.  Got some poor photos, the best of which is attached below.  I don't see any winter records for SF in eBird, and there isn't one on Mark Eaton's SF checklist.

Unfortunately, there's zero way to see this bird from any public location, and even if it proves regular (I assume it's overwintering), I can't invite people in to see it these days.  If someone's desperate, they might try exploring Noe Street between Cesar Chavez and 27th in the hopes of encountering it there.

-- Adam Winer

P1040060.jpg


Re: Rachel Lawrence: A record setting year , 2020

Rachel Lawrence
 

Hi Dom, 
Thanks for being so magnanimous! I think we’re joint record holders on 273 though, as I understand eBird doesn’t filter for birds 
on the CA list. Oops Aaron just beat me to it
Anyway thanks for the comments
Rachel


From: SFBirds@groups.io <SFBirds@groups.io> on behalf of Dominik Mosur <dominikmosur@...>
Sent: Monday, January 4, 2021 10:57:42 AM
To: SF Birds <SFBirds@groups.io>
Subject: [SFBirds] Rachel Lawrence: A record setting year , 2020
 
I would like to congratulate Rachel Lawrence on setting a new single calendar year record for species observed in San Francisco county in 2020. Her eBird total of 277 eclipses the previous record  of 273 set in 2010(11?) if I recall correctly.

Great job putting in that work RACHEL!!

Dominik Mosur






Rachel Lawrence: A record setting year , 2020

 

I would like to congratulate Rachel Lawrence on setting a new single calendar year record for species observed in San Francisco county in 2020. Her eBird total of 277 eclipses the previous record of 273 set in 2010(11?) if I recall correctly.

Great job putting in that work RACHEL!!

Dominik Mosur


Rock, Shrike Jan 3

Dave Weber
 


Rock Sandpiper and Loggerhead Shrike both seen at their respective locations this morning. Details in ebird later.


Dave Weber,
Milpitas
By phone


1.3.21 just outside arboretum super active right now

lwpayne919
 

8:30 am near 9th ave by blue “reopen safely,” trash cans and gg park map

warbler city: orange crowned, townsend’s, and possibly a tennessee (?)

plus glimpse of the thrush with faded spots

plus anna’s

plus juncos

plus song sparrow

plus a loud robin

lewis


Re: Yosemite Slough access

Loretta
 

Thanks for the excellent directions, Rachel and Russ.

The shrike was on the wall this morning, hanging out, giving great looks to anyone who had a scope. Luckily, another birder there had one and let me take a look.

Good birding!

Loretta

On Thursday, December 31, 2020, 8:25:45 PM PST, Rachel Lawrence <rachelalawrence@...> wrote:


Hi Loretta and Lisa,
Drive to the end of Revere and park at the end on the left, at the moment a load of trash has been dumped , but somewhere in the trash is a parking space :)
Then looking at the pond from the alleyway to the southwest of Revere (ie turn right at the end), you should be able to see the shrike without fence crawling. I saw it yesterday from the alleyway but didn’t do an ebird checklist, I know that some have gone through the fence but it’s not necessary, it’ll pop up after a while,I was there about 10mins.
Yesterday there was someone gardening in an “altered state” but they seemed completely unaware of anything else let alone me. Still good to be cautious..
Good luck 
Rachel


From: SFBirds@groups.io <SFBirds@groups.io> on behalf of Lisa Morehouse <morehouse.lisa@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 7:20:04 PM
To: lchen89@... <lchen89@...>
Cc: SF Birds <sfbirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SFBirds] Yosemite Slough access
 
Loretta I did the exact same thing today, with no luck. Went to Heron's Head instead (which is always wonderful) but I'd love to check out Yosemite Slough!

Lisa

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 7:07 PM Loretta via groups.io <lchen89=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Birders,

I wonder if someone would pass along advice on getting to the Yosemite Slough pond / shrike / birding location?

I did two drive bys looking for obvious, legal trails in and didn't see any. Are folks entering via hole in fence and hiking in? (Saw a potential entry point, but it required maneuvering past someone in an altered state. Emoji

Or are we just looking through fences from the less than charming roads?

Thanks and happy new year!

Loretta

P.S. Birded the botanical garden this morning and was happy to see a couple varied thrushes by the moon garden.



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californiafoodways.com
@cafoodways
415.517.4132


SFCBC, Area 9, SOMA.

bitanangan
 

Hi Birders,
      SOMA, as an understated and minimally descriptive CBC area title, roughly stretches diagonally from Duboce Park to Pier 94 from one corner and from South Beach Marina to Upper Noe Valley on the slope of Diamond Heights on the other. Within this rough, jagged square is the Inner Mission, Bernal Heights and Potrero Hill.
    Superb birders counted birds over assigned parks and neighborhoods, so thanks to Erica Harris, Scott Bowers, Tod Plummer, Jim Weigand and Bob Gunderson with each contributing unique birds to the overall total.
     We found 90 species of birds with huge numbers of Zonotrichia sparrows seemingly thriving wherever sufficient habitat allowed. From Pier 94 we conservatively estimated a thick, mile-long skein of cormorants at 5000 Double-crested and 300 Pelagic (from photographic samples). This afternoon north-bound flight-stream lasted for over 10 minutes. We also counted large numbers of crows and pigeons.
Other highlights:
Eurasion Wigeon photographed by Bob at Pier 94.
Light-phase Ferruginous Hawk soaring above Alemany Farm: thanks to Todd for his excellent description with the midday sun preventing a photo.
Barn Owl at Dolores Park found by Erica.
Pacific Loon photographed by Scott Bowers at Tire Beach, now Warm Water Cove.
American Pipits at Mission Bay found by Jim.
Red Crossbills and a Varied Thrush at Haas Playground as seen near dawn from Billy Goat Hill in Noe Valley by myself.
Thanks all.

Russ Bright






 

      
       
      








Yosemite Slough pond?

Alan Hopkins
 

Yosemite Slough pond? I thought you would like to know that the pond has nothing to do with the state park around Yosemite Slough. The pond is part of Parcel E on the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. Once you go beyond the fence you are on the shipyard and so federal property. I have a pass to be on some parts of the shipyard, I still get stopped by guards when the see me with a camera.

Venture onto the shipyard at your own risk.

Here is some info on Parcel E:







Alan S. Hopkins
San Francisco, CA


Downtown SF CBC Area 1 Highlights

Mike Carozza
 

Hi Birders,

Our team hit the downtown area that consists of the northeast portion of the city including Lafayette, Sue Bierman, Salesforce Parks and Coit Tower, as well as some of the smaller Pac Heights/Russian Hill parks and the Embarcadero down to just north of the ballpark marina.

We covered as much as 8 people could and counted 58 species and 1,972 birds.  Highlights included:
  • RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER at Alta Plaza (Thanks Pete & Annie)
  • GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET, Leucistic (?) BLACK PHOEBE, 6 ACORN WOODPECKERS at Lafayette Park (Thanks to Lafayette's resident birder, Lori)
  • NASHVILLE WARBLER, BULLOCK'S ORIOLES at Jefferson Square Park (Thanks Augie & Anna)
  • BRANDT'S CORMORANT in the harbor at the ferry building piers
  • RED-THROATED LOON off Pier 7
  • WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS at various locations (Thanks Steve)
  • 5 FOX SPARROWS - Ina Coolbrith Park in Russian Hill, eating rice
  • PAIR OF PEREGRINES that dropped out of the sky at Salesforce Park to scare the feathers off two juvenile Red-tails. A coordinated ambush that lasted 5 seconds, but I'm sure the hawks won't forget it. (Thanks Loren for getting us on them.)
If I learned anything, its that Jefferson Square Park is a good bird park.  Aside from the two rarities, Augie counted over 90 sparrows there, a high number for any location in SF in my experience.  Thanks to the team for an excellent day of birding.

Photos of the Nashville and Phoebe (links below):
B_B00170.jpg
B_B00022.jpg


Mike Carozza
914-475-9355

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