Date   

Clay Colored Sparrow at Lafayette Park

David Assmann
 
Edited

Hopping around on lawn above Gough Street with White Crowns


Fort Mason Local Interest

David Assmann
 
Edited

A lot of activity at Fort Mason on the weekend, with 60 species seen each day (birded each day with John and Erica).  On Saturday the day started with a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW foraging with other sparrows on the west side of the garden. Later a TROPICAL KINGBIRD spent time on the west edge of the garden. Altogether nine species of sparrow, including my FOS WHITE-THROATED SPARROW (also CHIPPING SPARROW and SAVANNAH SPARROW). Counted at least 14 WESTERN MEADOWLARKS. 2 WESTERN TANAGERS and 2 YELLOW WARBLERS were in the Battery. A MERLIN sat on the top of a Cypress south of the Battery (and showed up in the same spot on Sunday). Sunday a female BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK was in the garden (likely the same one seen by Eddie and Noreen on Saturday), a NASHVILLE WARBLER was in the Battery, and there were at least two LINCOLN'S SPARROWS (one in the garden and one in the Battery). A late HOODED ORIOLE was calling in the garden. A WARBLING VIREO was in front of the General's House, close to two RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKERS that were vocalizing loudly and chasing each other. Saturday checklist https://ebird.org/checklist/S74968420, and Sunday https://ebird.org/checklist/S75050771


Red-naped Sapsucker at GGP Horseshoe Pits

Elliot Janca
 

There is currently a Red-naped Sapsucker in the eucalyptus trees south of the Golden Gate Park Horseshoe Pits. See https://ebird.org/checklist/S75045026 for photos. Presumed last years returning bird. Coordinates: 37.7731095, -122.4554171.

-Elliot Janca


Oct. 17: Late migrants, Bald Eagle

Eddie Bartley
 

Noreen and I got a late start but when we arrived at Ft. Mason bird activity was still very high. Upon exiting our ride we heard alarm calls immediately looked up to an adult Peregrine with a yellowish-looking songbird in it's clutch. Missed both of David's rarities but located a female BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK, 2 Western Tanagers and a Nashville Warbler in the battery. SO many Yellow-rumps! https://ebird.org/checklist/S74987051

From El Polin Springs we heard a Red-tail complaint call looked up to a juvenile (first or second cycle) BALD EAGLE slow flapping over Inspiration Point, heading SE. Another "getting late" migrant was a WILSON"S WARBLER. https://ebird.org/checklist/S74986873


Traffic was a mess in northwest SF (everybody heading to Battery Godfrey maybe :) so we redirected to Mountain Lake where we were rewarded with another late migrant, a very pale WARBLING VIREO. Utterly failed at turning it into a Bell's Vireo by plumage, bill and size. Another bright Western Tanager on the way out was nice topper. https://ebird.org/checklist/S74997999

Happy Trails!

Eddie Bartley


Tropical Kingbird Clay Colored Fort Mason

David Assmann
 

In garden


Battery Godfrey Jackpot

Brian Fitch
 

Some newer birders saw multiple city lifers today, while several of us older folk had some great city year birds, all over many hours of watching from the battery, and amazingly almost all spotted by Eli Gross.  He noted that they would all have been sighted eventually by someone else, but today he was the finder extraordinair.

Highlights included a female Gadwall tucked in with scoters, two Canvasbacks (not sure who spotted those), a single White-faced Ibis flying east over the Golden Gate channel, two Broad-winged Hawks, a very close Short-eared Owl that appeared along the bluff, circled and finally flew off to the SE, another Short-eared that was kettling over Marin and then flew west toward Pt Bonita without crossing while visible, and a Tropical Kingbird that landed in front of us in the big cypress.  Hugh got us on a Golden Eagle that soared over the headlands for a while, but teasingly stayed in Marin.

A hot but really good day, with possibly the biggest crew I've ever seen on the battery.  There may be more to report later, as I left from pure exhaustion, while Joachim, Max and Eli were still watching.

Brian Fitch


Tropical Kingbird ElkGlen Lake

Richard Bradus
 

Flycatching from north side trees now!

RB
SF


Blackpoll Warblers

Joe Morlan
 

This morning there were two BLACKPOLL WARBLERS at the North end of Vista
Grande Canal near Lake Merced. Photos:

https://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/BlackpollWarblerIMG_0659.htm

Dropped pin: https://goo.gl/maps/Vh5KBmj3JhmHw5oz6
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA


Re: Towhee Juveniles?

Sally M. Walters
 

Nice! The bill among other things makes it the sparrow, and not the thrush.  The breast mostly hidden but what is shown are the distinctive teepee shapes of the brown feathers against white.  I was fooled at first. 
Thanks.


Sally M Walters



On Oct 13, 2020, at 10:35 AM, Peter & Amy <oshunoxt@...> wrote:

Pretty sure that’s what I saw too.  New for my backyard.  Thanks.

Amy

On Oct 13, 2020, at 8:55 AM, dominikmosur@... wrote:

That’s a fox sparrow.


On Oct 13, 2020, at 08:49, Andrew R <reckersandrew@...> wrote:


Interesting. I also saw a bird of that description yesterday in my backyard for the first time, and thought it was a pac fox sparrow. Maybe hermit thrush is a better match. I have a mediocre photo

On Mon, Oct 12, 2020 at 11:33 PM Marie McNulty via groups.io <salviavian=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hermit thrush perhaps.




On Monday, October 12, 2020, 3:26 PM, Peter & Amy <oshunoxt@...> wrote:

Forgive my not having a picture.  In my yard in the St. Mary’s Park area I have a pair of birds which I cannot identify.  They are the size and shape of CA Towhees and are acting exactly like the Towhee I am used to seeing in my backyard, staying on the ground and engaging in lots of digging and scratching.

But their plumage doesn’t match up.  One is the grey/brown I expect in a Towhee but no peachy area underneath and the breast is entirely striped. The other is lighter brown and striped top and bottom.  They are hanging closely together.

Is there anything other than a Towhee that these might be or might they be juveniles?  Or is it more likely that I’m seeing Pacific Fox Sparrows which I’ve never seen here in the past?

Any help would be much appreciated.

Amy Kuhlmann






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Laker Merced and Sutro Heights

Bob Hall
 

Birded Lake Merced from 9:30-12:30 and struck out on the goodies. Swarms of yellow-rumps in early on. There was a Bewick's wren in the brush pile near the willow trail. Cool to see eared grebes back on the lake. Spent a lot of time on the green towhee spot (Vista Grande) with no success. Got to see a bathing hermit warbler, though.

At Sutro Heights I heard there was a Brewer's sparrow there but what I saw looked more like a possible juvenile lark sparrow: central breast spot, black fu man chu, noticable white in the tail feathers. I also saw an enraged house wren.

Not sure how I missed the goodies. 2020.
--
Bob Hall
San Francisco, CA
"There is no better high than discovery." - E.O. Wilson


Re: Spellchecked Ferruginous

Brian Fitch
 

Just saw Rachel's photos, and will amend the report to note that the rug was an adult.  That's what I get for letting the bird go too early and trying to get others on it.

Brian Fitch


On Wed, Oct 14, 2020 at 2:10 PM Brian Fitch via groups.io <fogeggs=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
My account wasn't hacked by a rug salesperson, nor was I hallucinating about seeing an Aladdin type flyby, I was just trying to get the word out quickly for those who live nearby and haven't seen a Ferrug in the city yet.  Despite the report getting delayed by spell check, Joachim was able to see it a little later, and Rachel may have obtained some record photos of the high flying bird.

Besides the juvenile hawk, highlights included a Bonaparte's Gull and Parasitic Jaeger flying over the bridge parallel to each other, two juvenile harriers heading north and a female heading south, and a flock of 52 Cackling Geese going east.  Band-tailed Pigeons, Surf Scoters and Greater Scaup were on the increase, while no Broad-winged Hawks or Violet-green Swallows were noted. 

Brian Fitch


Spellchecked Ferruginous

Brian Fitch
 

My account wasn't hacked by a rug salesperson, nor was I hallucinating about seeing an Aladdin type flyby, I was just trying to get the word out quickly for those who live nearby and haven't seen a Ferrug in the city yet.  Despite the report getting delayed by spell check, Joachim was able to see it a little later, and Rachel may have obtained some record photos of the high flying bird.

Besides the juvenile hawk, highlights included a Bonaparte's Gull and Parasitic Jaeger flying over the bridge parallel to each other, two juvenile harriers heading north and a female heading south, and a flock of 52 Cackling Geese going east.  Band-tailed Pigeons, Surf Scoters and Greater Scaup were on the increase, while no Broad-winged Hawks or Violet-green Swallows were noted. 

Brian Fitch


Philly V still there at 1:30

Siobhan Ruck
 

Thanks, Russ! The vireo popped up directly above the sign just now. 

Siobhan Rick


On Oct 14, 2020, at 1:05 PM, bitanangan <birdbright@...> wrote:

Hi Birders,
     The vireo was seen again c 11:40 in the willows near the brown “No Fishing” sign south of the concrete bridge. The towhee continues now just N of the black pipe along the Vista Grande Canal.
Russ Bright
SF


Continuing Green-tailed Towhee and Philadelphia Vireo.

bitanangan
 

Hi Birders,
     The vireo was seen again c 11:40 in the willows near the brown “No Fishing” sign south of the concrete bridge. The towhee continues now just N of the black pipe along the Vista Grande Canal.
Russ Bright
SF


Ferruginous Hawk yard

Joachim Gonzalez
 

Ferruginous Hawk going east over Lone Mountain. Likely on a similar trajectory as the Bald Eagle a few days ago. 

Good Birding,
Joachim Gonzalez


Hooded merganser Stow Lake

Stefanie Arthur
 


Stefanie Arthur
San Francisco


Sent from my Samsung Galaxy


Re: Get rug

Brian Fitch
 

Ferruginous hawk not rug


On Wed, Oct 14, 2020 at 11:46 AM Brian Fitch via groups.io <fogeggs=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Southbound from battery Godfrey


Get rug

Brian Fitch
 

Southbound from battery Godfrey


The other seabird island - and my Big Walk.

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

SF birders,

   Ok, I realize that Southeast Farallon Island is amazingly important world wide for seabirds, monitoring and conservation. However, remember that concept about putting all of your eggs in one basket? There is another local island where auklets breed, elephant seals snort and biologists work their magic to understand the world of seabirds. That is Año Nuevo Island, in southern San Mateo County. I have never landed on SE Farallon, but I have been on Año Nuevo, and it is amazing and important! With that in mind, let me tell you a bit about what is going on there and my “Big Walk for Auklets.”

 

    For 28 seasons, a project has been happening right in our neighborhood which most birders do not know about. The monitoring and restoration of the seabird colony at Año Nuevo Island, in San Mateo county. This work is being done by the amazing biologists, interns, and volunteers for Oikonos Ecosystems Knowledge a non-profit working to study and conserve seabirds throughout the world. Their major projects are in Chile, Hawaii, and here at Año Nuevo. https://oikonos.org/

    On Año Nuevo Island the biologists have deployed artificial ceramic nests for both Rhinoceros and Cassin’s auklets, and they have restored habitat with native coastal plants that hold the soil and prevent the erosion that can be so troubling for the auklets. Since habitat improvements started in 2010, the population of auklets has more than doubled on the island, the effort works! At the same time the biologists are monitoring a total of 8 seabird species, including growth rates, population numbers, and food being brought to the nest. In 2020 for example Cassin’s Auklets were a month early in their breeding due to abundance of krill offshore, and Rhinoceros Auklets brought bay only Pacific Anchovy to the nests. Usually the Rhinos bring back a diversity of fish, but anchovy was so plentiful in 2020 that they became specialists on this fish!

    How will all of this change as marine heat waves become the norm? We do not know, but we are certain that long term monitoring programs, and seabird conservation initiatives such as this one are vital to understanding the dynamics of change, and perhaps what we need to do to adapt as well.

   Recently I joined the board at Oikonos and have been amazed that all of this was happening right here in the Bay Area and that most birders are not entirely aware of the work. That is the main goal of this not, to let you know that this near shore island near the border between Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties is a hotbed for seabird conservation and research. The biologists I have met working at Oikonos are also amazing, a creative and dedicated group of people who are changing the world either here or in other parts of the world where they are working. As well, each year new biologists and conservationists are trained as part of these projects, the future of seabirds and their conservation will be in the hands of these young biologists!

     As this is a challenging year economically for so many organizations, it is not surprising perhaps that funds are needed to keep this long-term project happening. That is why tomorrow I am doing my “Big Walk for Auklets.” The idea is to walk within a 5 mile radius of my house in Half Moon Bay, see as many species of birds as I can, and hopefully survive the nearly 20 mile jaunt I will do in my quest to beat 110 species on foot power. Please have a look at this website if you want to donate to the project and to my fundraiser. https://secure.givelively.org/donate/oikonos-ecosystem-knowledge/alvaro-jaramillo-1

   Thanks so much. Good birding and wish me and the auklets luck.

 

Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 


Green-tailed Towhee and Red Phalarope Oct 13

Dave Weber
 

Green-tailed Towhee was seen this morning around 11:15 am on west side of Vista Grande Canal about 60 yards north of black pipe with graffiti and at 12:15pm about 25 yards closer to same pipe. Both times on slope between black chain-link fence and edge of golf course scratching in leaf litter with Fox Sparrows. The Red Phalarope was on Lake Merced around noon.

Dave Weber,
Milpitas
By phone

361 - 380 of 25320