Date   

Re: Log Cabin Chestnut-sided

Richard Bradus
 

A few details:

After spending an hour and a half looping the Log Cabin Trail area with Nico Stuurman, seeing some nice birds but nothing rare, I decided to stick around and encountered Frank Merino while toiling away trying to get photos of an elusive gray-headed Orange-crowned Warbler. Like the rest of us, he had no luck with the Magnolia Warbler, but he had encountered a Chestnut-sided and managed to get some decent photos. So I made my way slowly back east along the trail, eventually re-encountering Cliff Yap (who had been there longer than me!) and he also had seen the Chestnut-sided, but indicated that it had flown north, perhaps toward the trees extending off JFK Drive.

It took more than another half-hour of craning my neck peering into this row of trees, but eventually a vocal gang of three Yellow Warblers appeared and - ta-da! - high in the canopy another, light bottomed bird, our suspect. Really difficult to see well as it stayed very high in the trees, gleaning almost non-stop and stubbornly most of the time in dense foliage, but I managed to see all the important details. It is a drab HY bird, showing just a bit of light green on the top of the (otherwise grayish) head and the back, a definite white eye ring and two very nice bright tan-yellow wing bars. It did not vocalize as far as I could tell (probably unwilling to compete with the louder Yellows!).

And - talk about good timing! - Joachim showed up just as I was sending out the initial email, so he got some decent looks as well. Also in the area were some more typical warblers (Townsend's mostly but also Wilson's and Orange-crowned and Yellow-rumps) plus a surprise Common Yellowthroat, Ruby-crowned Kinglets (FOF for me), many of the other regulars plus a Red-breasted Sapsucker.

So, some rather hard-earned rewards on what turned out to be an uncomfortably hot (and smokey) day.

Good luck! 
Be safe and mind the air quality.

Richard Bradus
San Francisco



On Friday, October 2, 2020, 1:51:54 PM PDT, Richard Bradus via groups.io <grizzledjay@...> wrote:


No Magnolia but a Chestnut-sided trees off JFK Drive

Richard






Log Cabin Chestnut-sided

Richard Bradus
 

No Magnolia but a Chestnut-sided trees off JFK Drive

Richard


Oct 1 Ft. Mason Battery: Virginia's or extremely gray Nashville?

Eddie Bartley
 

Photos (cropped and reduced to 100dpi only) of putative Virginia's Warbler or extremely gray Nashville at Ft. Mason Battery on October 1 embedded in this checklist:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S74293481

Eddie Bartley


Re: Pectoral/Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at the Yosemite Slough Pond

Aaron Maizlish
 

SF Birders,

I put up a gallery of photos of the sandpiper in question tonight on my eBird checklist at:  https://ebird.org/checklist/S74304777 

Like I said, the bird was very distant at the back end of the pond toward the right.  I shot this with a 500mm lens.   Going through my photos I am also detecting two different Pectoral  Sandpipers, seen on opposite ends of the pond on my first past through (it’s late and I hope I’m not confusing one with the third bird.)

From consulting Sibley and Nat Geo, I’m still not sure, though I’m leaning to Sharp-tailed Sandpiper - but I sure wish the photos were a lot sharper so I could really see the breast pattern more clearly.  The white supercilium, rufous cap, and orange wash on breast all point to S-T.  The facial pattern and breast pattern are somehow different than what I’ve seen in Pectoral variation.

Bird was photographed at about 1:45pm today.  High tide, very smoky air, 82 degrees.  If the bird returns tomorrow and is closer to the fence that would quickly resolve the issue.  I may check again tomorrow near high tide (12:12pm), but maybe try earlier in the day when the heat shimmer hasn’t built up.

There were about ten dowitchers on the pond and an early Dunlin.

Educated opinions welcome.



Aaron Maizlish








On Oct 1, 2020, at 5:48 PM, Aaron Maizlish via groups.io <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

SF Birders,

I just wanted to get the word out before it gets dark, though I haven’t done all of my due diligence and I’m not making the call yet.

I spent some time this afternoon getting distant photos of what I believe is a 1st year Sharp-tailed Sandpiper.   I had meetings all afternoon and didn’t get to look at the photos until just now but I think this looks promising.

Yosemite Slough “Community Garden” pond.  Park at the very end of Revere Street (unfortunately filled with trash right now) and look through the fence at the pond.  On the left half of the pond was a juvenile Pectoral Sandpiper.   On the right half of the pond at the very far back were about 100 peeps.  Among them is a first year Pectoral/Sharp-tailed.   Buffy unstreaked breast, strong white supercilium, brown cap - no eye ring (probably variable in a HY bird.).  Worth checking out!

As always be safe and aware at this spot.  Homeless people have all been very friendly to birders - let’s keep it that way.   

Good luck,

Aaron


<IMAGE 2020-10-01 17:47:43.jpg>


Re: Unusual Sapsuckers

Brian Fitch
 

I just recalled my old Kaufman guide to advanced birding, and the section on sapsuckers.  In it he states that Red-naped Sapsuckers develop an adult head pattern before migration, by mid-September at the latest, and he also describes the crown as dark brown.  The flyby at the battery was beige on the crown, and had no adult patterning on the head at all, so my first statement about Red-naped not being ruled out appears to be in error, and the bird was a juvenile Yellow-bellied.

I'm not doing a big year, and have already seen Yellow-bellied in SF twice, so this change is not driven by any of the competitive issues that have been degrading SF birding recently.
Brian Fitch


On Mon, Sep 28, 2020 at 5:16 PM Brian Fitch via groups.io <fogeggs=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Another theme day, with 2 unidentified birds as the focus.  The first was a northbound flyby at Battery Godfrey, a juvenile sapsucker with white wing patches and mostly beige body color, seen only as it flew away from the group.  If it had a white rump, I was unable to see it.  The beigeness implies Yellow-bellied, but the view was inadequate to rule out Red-naped.

The second bird was seen by many at El Polin, and was close in appearance to an adult male Red-naped, except that some red feathering was on the breast, and there was more red on the head than the guides show.  It stayed tucked into a tree such that no one got photos.

The battery was a letdown, as the forecasted wind never materialized in any notable way.  Over a thousand Vaux's Swifts fluttering through in very diffuse flocks were the other highlight.
Brian Fitch


Re: Bobolink at Crissy

H Cotter
 

Following on a sighting at the westside of the lagoon - approx. 45 minutes later I had another Bobolink sighting on the east side of the lagoon with a sparrow flock near the parking area just east of the path that comes from the lagoon bridge.
From photographs it looks like these may be different birds. Hugh

image.jpeg
image.jpeg



On Thu, Oct 1, 2020 at 9:18 AM H Cotter via groups.io <chatwren=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Currently in area on the NE side of the main lawn near the lagoon - dunes, willows and grass 
Dozens of pipits around 
Hugh


Jefferson Square is punching above its weight

Smokey Bear
 

It must be raining warblers if even Jefferson Square is producing goodies.

Last Friday passing through on my way to play tennis I found six YELLOW WARBLERS, a BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, a WILSON’S WARBLER, an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER and a TOWNSEND’S WARBLER, a haul I would be happy with from any park.

Today I didn’t want to breathe too much smoke so I sauntered back to sad little Jefferson Square after work. Lucky I had my binoculars. Among the TOWNSEND’S WARBLER, the 3 YELLOW WARBLERS, a YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER was....

a NASHVILLE WARBLER!!! (If I ever have a band, that will be the name.) I got great looks at its gray-sided head, yellow throat, complete eye-ring, and white lower belly.

Among the Yellow Warblers was one bird that stymied me - it was dun-colored overall, as opposed to the greenish dull Yellow Warblers, and its eyes lacked the subtle Yellow Warbler eyering. The eyes seemed to bug out a bit, which put me in the mind of a vireo of some kind, but the eyes lacked a strong white stripe or ring seen on a vireo. I spent a long time looking. Maybe it was a funny Warbling Vireo or a very unusually dull Yellow Warbler, I couldn’t quite tell. I can’t think of anything more exotic it could be.

A Cooper’s Hawk, lots of parrots, some Black Phoebes, and good hummers and corvids rounded out the evening.

Anna


Rock Wren continues in the Presidio

David Nelson
 

The Rock Wren reported by Logan this morning was re-found on the roof of 511 Simonds Loop, then flew down to the ground across the street from 512 Simonds Loop.

Good Birding!

David W. Nelson


Pectoral/Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at the Yosemite Slough Pond

Aaron Maizlish
 

SF Birders,

I just wanted to get the word out before it gets dark, though I haven’t done all of my due diligence and I’m not making the call yet.

I spent some time this afternoon getting distant photos of what I believe is a 1st year Sharp-tailed Sandpiper.   I had meetings all afternoon and didn’t get to look at the photos until just now but I think this looks promising.

Yosemite Slough “Community Garden” pond.  Park at the very end of Revere Street (unfortunately filled with trash right now) and look through the fence at the pond.  On the left half of the pond was a juvenile Pectoral Sandpiper.   On the right half of the pond at the very far back were about 100 peeps.  Among them is a first year Pectoral/Sharp-tailed.   Buffy unstreaked breast, strong white supercilium, brown cap - no eye ring (probably variable in a HY bird.).  Worth checking out!

As always be safe and aware at this spot.  Homeless people have all been very friendly to birders - let’s keep it that way.   

Good luck,

Aaron



Eagle (bald ?)

Rachel Lawrence
 

Going south over Glen Canyon 
I think but am driving so trying to look at the road as well


Magnolia warbler

Erica Harris
 

On log cabin trail; mid-trail east of meadow working the blackberry bushes amongst the ivy on south side of trail


Cont. Philly

Brian Fitch
 

I just came home from El Polin, where the Philadelphia Vireo made a brief appearance.  It was in the large native willow that branches out from the ground, adjacent to the stone well and benches in the middle of the trail loop.  The bird was associating with the dark capped Warbling Vireo for good comps.  The hybrid sapsucker was in the big weeping willow, and also took a bath in the spring.

No luck with the Bobolink at Crissey.  A few Vaux's Swifts and a single Northern Harrier were the highlights at Battery Godfrey.
Brian Fitch


Lark Sparrow at Fort Mason

David Assmann
 

A LARK SPARROW was in front of the headquarters building this morning.  The PALM WARBLER continues as well.  An AMERICAN PIPIT was on the Great Meadow, and a CHIPPING SPARROW was south of the General's House.  Also had an unsatisfactory look at a skulking sparrow with a little orange behind the tennis courts.  Yesterday there was an AMERICAN REDSTART in the Battery.


Rock Wren Simonds Loop

Logan Kahle
 

Hi All,

Just a brief note that a Rock Wren has been present on Simonds Loop since 9/29. The bird was first heard on that day by Eric Heisey and later by myself. We relocated it this morning and were able to get visuals. It is pretty hard to see at times given how exposed the habitat it is, seeming to spend most of its time on rooftops picking through shingles for invertebrates. We saw it on the 513 and 512 duplexes. It would call infrequently and erratically. The bird can most easily be seen from the roads so please don’t poke around in the back yards if you try for it.

Eric had a good wave of other migrants this morning—mockingbird, say’s phoebe, bh grosbeak, and bt gray warbler among them. Still plenty to be found!

Best,
Logan


Bobolink at Crissy

H Cotter
 

Currently in area on the NE side of the main lawn near the lagoon - dunes, willows and grass 
Dozens of pipits around 
Hugh


Re: Pulse of migrants today?

Bob Hall
 

After seeing black-throated grey, Nashville w.and yellow warbler at home, I skipped some chores on the hunch that a pulse of migrants was flowing through. I did a bike loop that included GGP Oak woodlands, Strawberry Hill, Mountain Lake, Crissy Lagoon and El Polin Spring. There were lots of warning vireos, fox sparrows, hermit thrushes and crowned sparrows around.

The GGP Park Log cabin trail had a lot of action:
WW Pewee
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-rumped w
Orange-crowned w
Wilson’s w
Townsend w
Lincoln’s sparrow
Highlight for me was the MacGillvray’s warbler

On the way to Strawberry Hill, Nancy Palmer and Ken Loy pointed out the hermit warbler to me in a cypress across from Stow Lake.

Not much action in the Presidio.

Bob Hall



--
Bob Hall
San Francisco, CA
"There is no better high than discovery." - E.O. Wilson


migration doesn’t stop for smoke breaks 10/1/2020

 

Despite the haze from the fires small burtss of Violet-green Swallows Vaux’s Swifts, Yellow-rumped Warblers et al. are passing south past Corona Hill at 450-550’ or so.

Enjoy the day,
Dominik Mosur


Continuing Waterthrush

Brian Fitch
 

Five hours of birding Lake Merced and Golden Gate Park turned up a decent number of regular western migrants, and the/a Northern Waterthrush at the concrete bridge.  I heard the bird calling repeatedly as it approached the bridge from the willows to the NE, and then it popped up directly below me for a good but quick view before flying back into the reeds.

I haven't seen the beach at South Lake Merced so extensive in years, so watching it for shorebirds or other unusual species is worth some effort.  It made me recall the Nelson's Sparrow from 2001, a bird that spent some hours running along this little stretch of barren mud.

Brian Fitch


Pulse of migrants today?

Bob Hall
 

I've already had Nashville, yellow and black-throated gray in my backyard. Could be a good day to skip out on chores.
--
Bob Hall
San Francisco, CA
"There is no better high than discovery." - E.O. Wilson


Things are building offshore! Pelagic on Sunday 4th.

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Hello all,

   We did not have any trips from Half Moon Bay this last weekend. We were down south in Morro Bay and Monterey Bay, and our friends (Redwood Region Ornithological Society) had a great trip out of Bodega Bay. The story is that South Polar Skuas are in, Buller’s Shearwaters are building, multiple Flesh-footed Shearwaters were seen, and storm-petrels continue to be common and findable. Numbers of Black-footed Albatross are building again, as the late summer is when their numbers are lowest, and in Morro Bay the Black-vented Shearwaters had arrived and seem to be moving north. So if you were out earlier in the season, things have shifted, with later season birds now having arrived. If you want a good shot at seeing Flesh-footed Shearwater, Buller’s and South Polar Skua all are likely and hoped for this weekend. We are heading out on Sunday the 4th.  We have 4 spots remaining, we will be going to SF and San Mateo counties.

     Note also that recently we have seen big pods of dolphins, and last time we were out Blue Whales were seen from Half Moon Bay.

 

https://www.alvarosadventures.com/pelagic-dates-2020.html

 

take care and good birding!

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

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