Date   

Re: Northern Mockingbird (video)

Donna Hayes
 

Seems to have lots of American robin in there.

Donna Hayes 


On Mar 21, 2020, at 6:34 PM, Mila Zinkova <Milazinkova@...> wrote:


Hello.
I wonder what birds he incorporates in this video?
Thank you!
Mila.


Northern Mockingbird (video)

Mila Zinkova <Milazinkova@...>
 

Hello.
I wonder what birds he incorporates in this video?
Thank you!
Mila.


2 Orioles at Fort Mason

David Assmann
 

A nice male HOODED ORIOLE and a WILSON'S WARBLER were the only new migrants at Fort Mason today.  The ORCHARD ORIOLE in the garden was a little bolder than yesterday. The WANDERING TATTLER was on the abandoned pier in Aquatic Park.  Many of the remaining YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS are singing.  The NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD in the garden is now singing non stop for hours, having incorporated many different species' repertoires, including Red-Masked Parakeet, California Scrub Jay, American Robin, California Towhee, and others. The Yellow-Shafted NORTHERN FLICKER spent a little time at the bird bath. 


Grebes a'Bobbing

Richard Bradus
 

Hi all

Went out to India Basin near noon today but my timing remains lousy: came at low tide the first time there (last December) and this time just after high tide, which meant disappointingly few shorebirds. Plus lots of sleeping ducks and grebes.

No matter. Now that spring has officially arrived, those hormones are surging. A mockingbird sang intermittently much of the time I was there, moving all around but failing to attract anything (a good repertoire, but nothing like the Mockingbird that held forth yesterday in the Fort Mason Community Garden, with a whole slew of robin variations and other treats as it sang almost continuously). But the grebes are getting on. I was able to watch as first a pair of Western Grebes and, closer in, a pair of Clark's engaged in nice bonding displays, with synchronized head bobbing and neck swaying. Neither did an actual "dance" but I suspect that is not far off. Reason enough to get out there and enjoy nature's blessings (socially distanced, of course).

Stay safe (and sane).

Richard Bradus
San Francisco



Spring Migrants at Fort Mason - Bullock's Oriole, Western Kingbird

David Assmann
 

A small migrant push was evident at Fort Mason this morning.  A male BULLOCK'S ORIOLE flew into the Eucalyptus trees west of the garden early this morning, and a WESTERN KINGBIRD flew into the Battery and landed at the top of a tree. A SAVANNAH SPARROW in the garden was presumably also a migrant. The male ORCHARD ORIOLE continues (yesterday it was very vocal - today it was much quieter and skittish). The three WESTERN BLUEBIRDS have now been around for weeks, and hopefully it will mean nesting - this could possibly be a pair and a younger "helper." The number of YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS has dropped dramatically over the past week. Two VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOWS flew over the Great Meadow. Both the YELLOW-SHAFTED NORTHERN FLICKER and the Integrade were in the garden. BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS have returned - I counted at least five. A CHESTNUT-BACK CHICKADEE was carrying nesting material.


Re: Goldeneye @ Stow on 3/17

Dario Taraborelli
 

The goldeneye was there at the end of the day (6pm) on the south-east side of the lake. I don’t have photos but I think I saw yellow eyes which would potentially rule out a juvenile. I’ll try and go back later and check out the lake again. 


On Wed, Mar 18, 2020 at 11:08 AM Ken Moy <ken.moy62@...> wrote:
Hi, sorry for the late post. Yesterday, during my solo and socially distanced foray in GGP, I spotted a female or immature goldeneye @ 9:30 am between the stone bridge and the boat house. Refound it near the boat house around 10:30. Both times it tended to dive and forage close to the surface of the water and I as able to track its progress through eddies and bubbles. The bird had a medium brown head with dark brown/black bill, white collar at the base of the neck, light gray breast and sides and blackish wings with minor white streaks. Could not determine whether it was a Barrow's or Common but the high forehead inclined me towards Barrow's. Hooded merganser continues at Stow but the cinnamon teal did not appear. Also had the red-breasted sapsucker (ruber) in the first  eucalyptus on the south side of the Oak Woodland that heads west from the water fountain behind McLaren Lodge around 11:30.

Happy birding and be well.

Ken Moy


Goldeneye @ Stow on 3/17

Ken Moy
 

Hi, sorry for the late post. Yesterday, during my solo and socially distanced foray in GGP, I spotted a female or immature goldeneye @ 9:30 am between the stone bridge and the boat house. Refound it near the boat house around 10:30. Both times it tended to dive and forage close to the surface of the water and I as able to track its progress through eddies and bubbles. The bird had a medium brown head with dark brown/black bill, white collar at the base of the neck, light gray breast and sides and blackish wings with minor white streaks. Could not determine whether it was a Barrow's or Common but the high forehead inclined me towards Barrow's. Hooded merganser continues at Stow but the cinnamon teal did not appear. Also had the red-breasted sapsucker (ruber) in the first  eucalyptus on the south side of the Oak Woodland that heads west from the water fountain behind McLaren Lodge around 11:30.

Happy birding and be well.

Ken Moy


hooded oriole

Rachel Lawrence
 

on east side of Holly Park, Bernal Heights 20 minutes ago
happy birding
Rachel


Re: Birding during the Current Shelter-in-Place Order

Siobhan Ruck
 

Because if the Arboretum (or other city facilities) are open, workers need to come in and staff the place, and areas need to be cleaned repeatedly and thoroughly - with cleaning supplies that are getting harder to find.  The idea is to keep the bare minimum of people on the streets for now.  We have plenty of other options for getting outside, so we should not be forcing people to go to work just so we don’t have to give up a preferred outdoor space.  The more seriously we take this now, the sooner things can begin returning to normal.

Siobhan Ruck



On Mar 16, 2020, at 8:28 PM, Chrisand Lorelei <chrisandlorelei@...> wrote:

But why? Even before the Arb started charging non-SF admission, it was an uncrowded space. Since then, being within 6 feet of anyone else has been rare and totally avoidable. Mostly, it's more like 60 feet. 
Thanks for the head's up. *sigh*


From: SFBirds@groups.io <SFBirds@groups.io> on behalf of Dario Taraborelli <dario.taraborelli@...>
Sent: Monday, March 16, 2020 7:07 PM
To: Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...>
Cc: SF Birds <SFBirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SFBirds] Birding during the Current Shelter-in-Place Order
 
Thanks, Aaron. 

Just an additional heads up to this list that the Botanical Garden closes tonight through April 7 following the public health order. 

On Mar 16, 2020, at 17:21, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

Birding friends,

As most of you hopefully know by now, a joint order was sent out today by the Public Health Departments for San Francisco, San Mateo, Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara, Marin Counties and the City of Berkeley (which has its own public health department.).  The public health order instructs residents to Shelter-in-Place at their place of residence except for to conduct Essential Activities.  The order extends through April 7th, and makes it a misdemeanor to ignore the order.  The Public Health Order defines Essential Activities and defines appropriate Social Distancing Requirements that you must use when you are in a public space.

This is not the right forum to discuss and debate what will remain open and what will constitute an essential activity, and I’m not a medical professional or public health official anyway so you shouldn’t take advice from me. I will say however that it would be wise for you to read the notice that went out for your county rather than rely on social media and public opinion to tell you what you can and can’t do.  The notices (which are mostly the same by county) are clearly written. Take special note of the additional instructions for older people and people with health conditions.

For birding, it is important to note that outdoor exercise is covered as an allowable Essential Activity.  

a. For purposes of this Order, individuals may leave their residence only to perform any of the following “Essential Activities.” But people at high risk of severe illness from COVID-19 and people who are sick are urged to stay in their residence to the extent possible except as necessary to seek medical care...

iii. To engage in outdoor activity, provided the individuals comply with Social Distancing Requirements as defined in this Section, such as, by way of example and without limitation, walking, hiking, or running.

Put simply, if you are healthy and not at high risk for illness you are legally permitted to engage in outdoor activities provide that you maintain six foot distance from others and practice other sanitary practices as outlined in the Order.  Whether you choose to do so or not is up to you.  I expect we will all learn in the next few days what is considered socially acceptable.  Speaking for myself, I plan to do some birding in order to get out of the house and get some exercise (since the gym is closed anyway), but I will probably choose regional parks and rural beaches rather than city parks in order to maintain isolation.  Also, I don’t plan to bird with a group or engage in any other group activities outside of the home. I did get a notice last night from East Bay Regional Parks that all facilities will be closed, but all parks and trails will remain open.  This too could change day to day.

I hope that the opportunity to get some sunshine and to look at birds in spring migration will be a welcome break from the stress of living under quarantine. 

Here are a few of the Public Health Orders.


I hope you all find this helpful.

Stay healthy!


Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco, CA




Re: Birding during the Current Shelter-in-Place Order

Chrisand Lorelei
 

But why? Even before the Arb started charging non-SF admission, it was an uncrowded space. Since then, being within 6 feet of anyone else has been rare and totally avoidable. Mostly, it's more like 60 feet.
Thanks for the head's up. *sigh*


From: SFBirds@groups.io <SFBirds@groups.io> on behalf of Dario Taraborelli <dario.taraborelli@...>
Sent: Monday, March 16, 2020 7:07 PM
To: Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...>
Cc: SF Birds <SFBirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SFBirds] Birding during the Current Shelter-in-Place Order
 
Thanks, Aaron. 

Just an additional heads up to this list that the Botanical Garden closes tonight through April 7 following the public health order. 

On Mar 16, 2020, at 17:21, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

Birding friends,

As most of you hopefully know by now, a joint order was sent out today by the Public Health Departments for San Francisco, San Mateo, Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara, Marin Counties and the City of Berkeley (which has its own public health department.).  The public health order instructs residents to Shelter-in-Place at their place of residence except for to conduct Essential Activities.  The order extends through April 7th, and makes it a misdemeanor to ignore the order.  The Public Health Order defines Essential Activities and defines appropriate Social Distancing Requirements that you must use when you are in a public space.

This is not the right forum to discuss and debate what will remain open and what will constitute an essential activity, and I’m not a medical professional or public health official anyway so you shouldn’t take advice from me. I will say however that it would be wise for you to read the notice that went out for your county rather than rely on social media and public opinion to tell you what you can and can’t do.  The notices (which are mostly the same by county) are clearly written. Take special note of the additional instructions for older people and people with health conditions.

For birding, it is important to note that outdoor exercise is covered as an allowable Essential Activity.  

a. For purposes of this Order, individuals may leave their residence only to perform any of the following “Essential Activities.” But people at high risk of severe illness from COVID-19 and people who are sick are urged to stay in their residence to the extent possible except as necessary to seek medical care...

iii. To engage in outdoor activity, provided the individuals comply with Social Distancing Requirements as defined in this Section, such as, by way of example and without limitation, walking, hiking, or running.

Put simply, if you are healthy and not at high risk for illness you are legally permitted to engage in outdoor activities provide that you maintain six foot distance from others and practice other sanitary practices as outlined in the Order.  Whether you choose to do so or not is up to you.  I expect we will all learn in the next few days what is considered socially acceptable.  Speaking for myself, I plan to do some birding in order to get out of the house and get some exercise (since the gym is closed anyway), but I will probably choose regional parks and rural beaches rather than city parks in order to maintain isolation.  Also, I don’t plan to bird with a group or engage in any other group activities outside of the home. I did get a notice last night from East Bay Regional Parks that all facilities will be closed, but all parks and trails will remain open.  This too could change day to day.

I hope that the opportunity to get some sunshine and to look at birds in spring migration will be a welcome break from the stress of living under quarantine. 

Here are a few of the Public Health Orders.


I hope you all find this helpful.

Stay healthy!


Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco, CA



Re: Birding during the Current Shelter-in-Place Order

Dario Taraborelli
 

Thanks, Aaron. 

Just an additional heads up to this list that the Botanical Garden closes tonight through April 7 following the public health order. 

On Mar 16, 2020, at 17:21, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

Birding friends,

As most of you hopefully know by now, a joint order was sent out today by the Public Health Departments for San Francisco, San Mateo, Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara, Marin Counties and the City of Berkeley (which has its own public health department.).  The public health order instructs residents to Shelter-in-Place at their place of residence except for to conduct Essential Activities.  The order extends through April 7th, and makes it a misdemeanor to ignore the order.  The Public Health Order defines Essential Activities and defines appropriate Social Distancing Requirements that you must use when you are in a public space.

This is not the right forum to discuss and debate what will remain open and what will constitute an essential activity, and I’m not a medical professional or public health official anyway so you shouldn’t take advice from me. I will say however that it would be wise for you to read the notice that went out for your county rather than rely on social media and public opinion to tell you what you can and can’t do.  The notices (which are mostly the same by county) are clearly written. Take special note of the additional instructions for older people and people with health conditions.

For birding, it is important to note that outdoor exercise is covered as an allowable Essential Activity.  

a. For purposes of this Order, individuals may leave their residence only to perform any of the following “Essential Activities.” But people at high risk of severe illness from COVID-19 and people who are sick are urged to stay in their residence to the extent possible except as necessary to seek medical care...

iii. To engage in outdoor activity, provided the individuals comply with Social Distancing Requirements as defined in this Section, such as, by way of example and without limitation, walking, hiking, or running.

Put simply, if you are healthy and not at high risk for illness you are legally permitted to engage in outdoor activities provide that you maintain six foot distance from others and practice other sanitary practices as outlined in the Order.  Whether you choose to do so or not is up to you.  I expect we will all learn in the next few days what is considered socially acceptable.  Speaking for myself, I plan to do some birding in order to get out of the house and get some exercise (since the gym is closed anyway), but I will probably choose regional parks and rural beaches rather than city parks in order to maintain isolation.  Also, I don’t plan to bird with a group or engage in any other group activities outside of the home. I did get a notice last night from East Bay Regional Parks that all facilities will be closed, but all parks and trails will remain open.  This too could change day to day.

I hope that the opportunity to get some sunshine and to look at birds in spring migration will be a welcome break from the stress of living under quarantine. 

Here are a few of the Public Health Orders.


I hope you all find this helpful.

Stay healthy!


Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco, CA



Birding during the Current Shelter-in-Place Order

Aaron Maizlish
 

Birding friends,

As most of you hopefully know by now, a joint order was sent out today by the Public Health Departments for San Francisco, San Mateo, Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara, Marin Counties and the City of Berkeley (which has its own public health department.).  The public health order instructs residents to Shelter-in-Place at their place of residence except for to conduct Essential Activities.  The order extends through April 7th, and makes it a misdemeanor to ignore the order.  The Public Health Order defines Essential Activities and defines appropriate Social Distancing Requirements that you must use when you are in a public space.

This is not the right forum to discuss and debate what will remain open and what will constitute an essential activity, and I’m not a medical professional or public health official anyway so you shouldn’t take advice from me. I will say however that it would be wise for you to read the notice that went out for your county rather than rely on social media and public opinion to tell you what you can and can’t do.  The notices (which are mostly the same by county) are clearly written. Take special note of the additional instructions for older people and people with health conditions.

For birding, it is important to note that outdoor exercise is covered as an allowable Essential Activity.  

a. For purposes of this Order, individuals may leave their residence only to perform any of the following “Essential Activities.” But people at high risk of severe illness from COVID-19 and people who are sick are urged to stay in their residence to the extent possible except as necessary to seek medical care...

iii. To engage in outdoor activity, provided the individuals comply with Social Distancing Requirements as defined in this Section, such as, by way of example and without limitation, walking, hiking, or running.

Put simply, if you are healthy and not at high risk for illness you are legally permitted to engage in outdoor activities provide that you maintain six foot distance from others and practice other sanitary practices as outlined in the Order.  Whether you choose to do so or not is up to you.  I expect we will all learn in the next few days what is considered socially acceptable.  Speaking for myself, I plan to do some birding in order to get out of the house and get some exercise (since the gym is closed anyway), but I will probably choose regional parks and rural beaches rather than city parks in order to maintain isolation.  Also, I don’t plan to bird with a group or engage in any other group activities outside of the home. I did get a notice last night from East Bay Regional Parks that all facilities will be closed, but all parks and trails will remain open.  This too could change day to day.

I hope that the opportunity to get some sunshine and to look at birds in spring migration will be a welcome break from the stress of living under quarantine. 

Here are a few of the Public Health Orders.


I hope you all find this helpful.

Stay healthy!


Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco, CA



Northern Gannet longevity

Joe Morlan
 

The only California record of Northern Gannet was first noted on the
Farallons 25 April 2012 and continued at various locations around San
Francisco Bay for almost eight years. The latest eBird record seems to be
28 January 2020 also from the Farallons.

Is anybody aware of more recent sightings of this individual? Given the pet
name "Morris" (Morus?) by some, is he gone?
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA


Re: Seeking ID assistance

Jessica Bolton
 

Hi all,

Here is the verdict on the species ID and a collation of the feedback regarding key characteristics:

1. Red-breasted sapsucker
  • Sapsuckers usually show a prominent white wing stripe, but it can get hidden, and other features look good.  The red on the head seems rather limited, so I'd say a juvenile (or molting)
    Red-breasted Sapsucker.

2. Nuttall’s Woodpecker 
  • Downy or Hairy (the other common species in SF) don’t have that barred pattern. 
  • Note the stripes on the back.
  • note ladder-back, and not a vertical white line down back like downy or hairy woodpecker
  • Nuttall’s has bars Downey is black with Center white stripe
  • You can tell by the stripes across his back
  • strongly "ladder-backed", and extensive red on crown. 

3. Hermit thrush
  • the only catharus thrush here in winter.  The second photo doesn't show as strong markings below as some, but it does show the eye ring, and the rusty tail i  the first photo is a giveaway.


4. Red-tailed hawk 
  • 1st year bird so it doesn’t yet have red tail. 
  • White upper chest and but does have dark belly feathers
  • Note the dark belly band. 
  • note white upper breast and blobby dark belly band, tails are brown in their first year of life


5. Red-shouldered hawk 
  • Note the reddish breast and belly 
  • A red-shouldered has a reddish unmarked chest and black and white bars on the tail
  • superficially like Cooper's hawk, and similar size, but note white speckling on wings, brown head and, while not a great field mark in the field, eye color is helpful in this photo. Buteos like Red-shoulders have tan/brown eyes whereas accipiters like Coops have yellow eyes that turn orange to red as they age
  • a Cooper's would not show then strongly barred wings.
  • probably a juvenile Red-shouldered - similar comments about bulk and tail.


Thanks again for tips and advice!

Cheers,
Jess

On Mar 14, 2020, at 2:19 PM, Aimee G <aimgoggins@...> wrote:

Can you please share the responses? They weren’t visible to the group. Thanks, and welcome!

On Mar 14, 2020, at 1:30 PM, Jessica Bolton <jessicajanebolton92@...> wrote:

Thanks so much everyone for the feedback! Some great pointers on features to look out for on the hawks and woodpecker. I really appreciate all the tips! 

Cheers,
Jess


On Mar 14, 2020, at 1:28 PM, Sarah Barsness <slbarsness@...> wrote:

Hi Jessica,
Not sure if anyone responded...you have these all pretty much right!

The second woodpecker is a Nuttal's. You can tell by the stripes across his back. 

The two hawks are Red-tailed and Red-shouldered.

Have fun! Sarah

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 12:04 PM Jessica Bolton <jessicajanebolton92@...> wrote:
Hi all,

I am new to SF birding scene (I moved here from Australia last year) and I am really enjoying getting to know the local species. That said, I have come across a few species that I haven’t been able to verify. I was hoping to get some assistance in ID-ing the following birds. I have narrowed them down to the species I think they might be but I would love confirmation from some local experts. 

1a+1b: Red-breasted Sapsucker? SF Botanical Garden
2: Downy Woodpecker or Nuttall’s Woodpecker? SF Botanical Garden
3a+3b: Hermit thrush? SF Botanical Garden
4: Red-shoulderd Hawk? SF Botanical Garden
5: Cooper’s Hawk? SF Botanical Garden

Many thanks, and happy birding!! 

Cheers,
Jess 

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<TBC_2JPG.jpeg>
<TBC_3a.jpeg><TBC_3bJPG.jpeg><TBC_4.jpeg>
<TBC_5.jpeg>





Kittiwake Fulton & Ocean Beach

basquebirder
 

There’s a Black-legged Kittiwake in the gull flock at Ocean Beach on Fulton Ave. There were 2 additional birds at the south end off of Sloat too in offshore gull flock. 
Cheers, 
Cédric


Re: Seeking ID assistance

Jessica Bolton
 

Thanks so much everyone for the feedback! Some great pointers on features to look out for on the hawks and woodpecker. I really appreciate all the tips! 

Cheers,
Jess


On Mar 14, 2020, at 1:28 PM, Sarah Barsness <slbarsness@...> wrote:

Hi Jessica,
Not sure if anyone responded...you have these all pretty much right!

The second woodpecker is a Nuttal's. You can tell by the stripes across his back. 

The two hawks are Red-tailed and Red-shouldered.

Have fun! Sarah

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 12:04 PM Jessica Bolton <jessicajanebolton92@...> wrote:
Hi all,

I am new to SF birding scene (I moved here from Australia last year) and I am really enjoying getting to know the local species. That said, I have come across a few species that I haven’t been able to verify. I was hoping to get some assistance in ID-ing the following birds. I have narrowed them down to the species I think they might be but I would love confirmation from some local experts. 

1a+1b: Red-breasted Sapsucker? SF Botanical Garden
2: Downy Woodpecker or Nuttall’s Woodpecker? SF Botanical Garden
3a+3b: Hermit thrush? SF Botanical Garden
4: Red-shoulderd Hawk? SF Botanical Garden
5: Cooper’s Hawk? SF Botanical Garden

Many thanks, and happy birding!! 

Cheers,
Jess 

<TBC_1aJPG.jpeg><TBC_1b.jpeg>
<TBC_2JPG.jpeg>
<TBC_3a.jpeg><TBC_3bJPG.jpeg><TBC_4.jpeg>
<TBC_5.jpeg>




Seeking ID assistance

Jessica Bolton
 

Hi all,

I am new to SF birding scene (I moved here from Australia last year) and I am really enjoying getting to know the local species. That said, I have come across a few species that I haven’t been able to verify. I was hoping to get some assistance in ID-ing the following birds. I have narrowed them down to the species I think they might be but I would love confirmation from some local experts. 

1a+1b: Red-breasted Sapsucker? SF Botanical Garden
2: Downy Woodpecker or Nuttall’s Woodpecker? SF Botanical Garden
3a+3b: Hermit thrush? SF Botanical Garden
4: Red-shoulderd Hawk? SF Botanical Garden
5: Cooper’s Hawk? SF Botanical Garden

Many thanks, and happy birding!! 

Cheers,
Jess 


Re: FOS Western Flycatcher @ Children's Garden in Botanical Garden

 

Western Flycatcher is synonymous with Pacific-slope/Cordilleran. The species split occurred in 1989 and Field Guides prior to then referred to it as Western Flycatcher.

You will often see people refer to silent Pacific-slope/Cordilleran Flycatchers as Western Flycatchers in respect of the difficulty in telling the two species apart visually. 

While the majority of Western Flycatchers that pass through here on the coast are probably Pacific-slope, and the early arrivals to known breeding grounds such as today's Golden Gate Park bird almost certainly so, I have no issue with reports using "Western" Flycatcher. Empidonax are difficult in the field and flippant attitude can often lead problem astray, so no issue with being extra cautious.

For what it's worth, Pacific-slope Flycatcher was unrecorded in the early 90s San Francisco Breeding Bird Atlas but since around 2010 it's been documented as a increasingly common nester in the Presidio, parts of Golden Gate Park and Glen Canyon. Similarly other parts of the state like the coastal slope of San Diego county have been colonized by pacific-slope Flycatchers which appear to be adapting to the mixed exotic "forest" habitat along edges of city parks and throughout suburbs.

Let me know if you have additional questions.

Dominik 


On Mar 13, 2020, at 15:27, Ralph McKinnon <mckinnon_ralph@...> wrote:

My field guides don't show a species named Western Flycatcher. I'm missing something. Maybe you mean Pac Slope?




On Friday, March 13, 2020, 3:20 PM, Dominik Mosur <dominikmosur@...> wrote:

Ralph,

Does original poster's description not match up with what you saw in the field?

Western Wood pewee doesn't typically arrive until mid April at the earliest , main pulse of migrants passing late April through May. They also don't exhibit any sort of "eye ring"

Description and timing are fine for a Western Flycatcher, albeit slightly earlier than the usual 3/20-3/25 range in recent years.

Let us all know, please.

Dominik Mosur



On Mar 13, 2020, at 15:14, Ralph McKinnon via Groups.Io <mckinnon_ralph@...> wrote:

Maybe WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE? Not sure...




On Friday, March 13, 2020, 2:58 PM, Ken Moy <ken.moy62@...> wrote:

Seen this morning around 10:30 for over 5 minutes: upright posture, orange yellow lower mandible and eyering extended past back of eye. Did not vocalize. It was above Muir Pond along with orange crowned and yellow-rumped warblers, pine siskins and ruby-crowned kinglets. Sighted calling Hutton's vireo on path to the pond for the flycatcher/kinglet/vireo trifecta.


Re: FOS Western Flycatcher @ Children's Garden in Botanical Garden

Dario Taraborelli
 

FWIW I was in the exact same location of the Children's Garden as Ken but earlier this morning and later confirmed with him the field marks of the bird I saw around 8:30 on a branch right above the pond at the John Muir Nature Trail and they are consistent with a pac-slope flycatcher. I stayed in the garden a bit longer and scanned again the same trees around 11 but couldn't find it again.


On Fri, Mar 13, 2020 at 3:20 PM Dominik Mosur <dominikmosur@...> wrote:
Ralph,

Does original poster's description not match up with what you saw in the field?

Western Wood pewee doesn't typically arrive until mid April at the earliest , main pulse of migrants passing late April through May. They also don't exhibit any sort of "eye ring"

Description and timing are fine for a Western Flycatcher, albeit slightly earlier than the usual 3/20-3/25 range in recent years.

Let us all know, please.

Dominik Mosur



On Mar 13, 2020, at 15:14, Ralph McKinnon via Groups.Io <mckinnon_ralph@...> wrote:

Maybe WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE? Not sure...




On Friday, March 13, 2020, 2:58 PM, Ken Moy <ken.moy62@...> wrote:

Seen this morning around 10:30 for over 5 minutes: upright posture, orange yellow lower mandible and eyering extended past back of eye. Did not vocalize. It was above Muir Pond along with orange crowned and yellow-rumped warblers, pine siskins and ruby-crowned kinglets. Sighted calling Hutton's vireo on path to the pond for the flycatcher/kinglet/vireo trifecta.


Re: FOS Western Flycatcher @ Children's Garden in Botanical Garden

 

Ralph,

Does original poster's description not match up with what you saw in the field?

Western Wood pewee doesn't typically arrive until mid April at the earliest , main pulse of migrants passing late April through May. They also don't exhibit any sort of "eye ring"

Description and timing are fine for a Western Flycatcher, albeit slightly earlier than the usual 3/20-3/25 range in recent years.

Let us all know, please.

Dominik Mosur



On Mar 13, 2020, at 15:14, Ralph McKinnon via Groups.Io <mckinnon_ralph@...> wrote:

Maybe WESTERN WOOD-PEWEE? Not sure...




On Friday, March 13, 2020, 2:58 PM, Ken Moy <ken.moy62@...> wrote:

Seen this morning around 10:30 for over 5 minutes: upright posture, orange yellow lower mandible and eyering extended past back of eye. Did not vocalize. It was above Muir Pond along with orange crowned and yellow-rumped warblers, pine siskins and ruby-crowned kinglets. Sighted calling Hutton's vireo on path to the pond for the flycatcher/kinglet/vireo trifecta.

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