Date   
Common merganser?

Ralph McKinnon
 

Any confirmation of the eBird report yesterday for this unusual species at Crissy Lagoon?

Thanks

RM



Barn Swallows

David Assmann
 

Six BARN SWALLOWS flew north along the beach past Fort Funston this morning - undoubtedly part of the early migration that Dominik mentioned earlier.

Woodpecker variety in northeast GGP

Richard Bradus
 

Hi all

Spent a bit of the noon hour along the Phil Arnold Oak Woodland Trail in GGP (north of McLaren Lodge and around the Horseshoe Courts). While I did not see the Red-naped Sapsucker that Brian T. reported on the 10th, there were five species of woodpecker and a couple of different subspecies, most of which spent some time in a couple of adjoining eucalyptus trees (but frustratingly high up - I have the resulting stiff neck!). 

The expected contingent included Red-shafted Flicker, Nuttal's, Downy and Hairy plus a typical Red-breasted Sapsucker (presumably daggetti). Providing some interesting contrast (as reported on eBird yesterday by Peter and Rudy et. al.) was a darker red-headed and breasted (ruber) Sapsucker showing a yellowish upper belly. And there was an intergrade Flicker with a red nape crescent and partly black, partly red whisker stripe that, interestingly, showed what looked to me like mostly reddish wing linings. And, befitting the mostly sunny and warm mid-day, there was some early breeding activity with a few songs or fragments from some of the small birds, plus a mating pair of Red-tails. 

Worth skipping lunch for! Though, if you decide to check out the area, I would advise going either in the morning or mid-afternoon, as the sun (and bright sky) was a major hindrance to fully visualizing these birds up high.

Richard Bradus
San Francisco


Black Skimmer preening (video)

Mila Zinkova
 

Probable 6th Black Skimmer

Rachel Lawrence
 

One in Crissy wildlife protection area east of pier seen from viewing platform around 2pm and  the 5 were still on the mudflat in the lagoon a few minutes later

5 Black Skimmers Crissy Lagoon

Rachel Lawrence
 

Currently 5 at Crissy

Black (Skimmer) Power at Crissy

Richard Bradus
 

On this M.L. King, Jr. Day there was a treat - the Black Skimmers put on quite a show late this afternoon at Crissy Field and beach. As David Assmann already reported, there were three resting on the exposed mudflats at low tide around 4pm on the lagoon. As the tide started rising and the evening approached they took flight, variously skimming individually or as a group, first along the bay shoreline and lagoon, later all along the shoreline from further east than we could see all the way out to Fort Point and maybe beyond. I had the fortune to meet up with Felix Rigau (as well as Rachel Lawrence and others) to share the spectacle. Some photos can be seen on our eBird checklists: https://ebird.org/checklist/S63617552 and https://ebird.org/checklist/S63617558

Richard Bradus
San Francisco

Black Skimmers and other local interest

David Assmann
 

There were 3 BLACK SKIMMERS in Crissy Lagoon this afternoon (first spotted yesterday) so we currently have Skimmers at two locations in San Francisco. Yesterday at the GGAS walk at Fort Mason, participants had good looks at the continuing adult male ORCHARD ORIOLE and the YELLOW-SHAFTED NORTHERN FLICKER. A BONAPARTE’S GULL was in Aquatic Park early yesterday morning and a NASHVILLE WARBLER continues in the Community Garden. On Saturday I had my FOS ALLEN’S HUMMINGBIRD at Fort Mason. Also on Saturday a RED-NECKED GREBE was in the water north of the Wave Organ.

continuing Rock Sandpiper

rosita94598
 

Rosita and I drove to Heron's Head this afternoon, walked out to the end and fairly easily found the Rock Sandpiper.  She tried to photograph the bird with her phone and spotting scope, but the bird kept going behind the large pieces of concrete rip-rap.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek

Merlin at Lafayette Park

Allan Ridley
 

A Merlin was hunting from the TV antenna on the apartment building on the NW corner of Sacramento and Octavia Sts. (1:00pm) The bird made a couple of high speed passes before coming up with a sparrow size meal, eaten back on the aerial. Carried prey away after a RTHA showed up.

Zonotrichia Hybrid Fort Scott 1/17

Logan Kahle
 

Hi All,

Bounced around a couple spots in the Presidio on Friday morning. The highlight was a hybrid Zonotrichia at Fort Scott at the north end of the Ball Fields opposite the Log Cabin. It was foraging on and around Storey ave, working from the north side of the road to the Ball Fields.

One of the parents is clearly a Golden-crowned Sparrow, but I'm still not sure if the other one is a White-throated or a White-crowned. I'm leaning towards the former, but could well be wrong. Any insights (especially for people with field experience with these hybrids) would be greatly appreciated.

In size and structure, the bird appeared like a typical Golden-crowned. The malar markings seemed stronger than Golden-crowned, the body was grayer overall. The bird's crown was gold in front with bright white towards the rear, and with distinctly yellow lores. The supercillium was quite broad. The bill was dark.

A few marginal doc shots are here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S63485450
A few better shots by Jonah from later in the day are here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S63496528

Good birding,

Logan

Summer Tanager

Ralph McKinnon
 

Eye level near beehive just north of Glen Canyon recreation center. Great for close up photos. 





Re: Yellow-bellied/Red-naped Sapsucker (McLaren Park: McNab Pond)

Daniel Scali
 

Birders,

I’ve updated my ebird list based on studying with Peter Pyle. We’re calling it more than likely Red-naped but can’t rule out hybrid with Yellow-bellied.

It needs refinding for better photos.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S63324624

And thanks again to Wesley Fritz and Rudy for their help.

Good searching!
Dan

Aquatic Park Skimmer

Jonah Benningfield
 

Today at 7:15 pm (!), I observed a Black Skimmer skimming along the Aquatic Park beach. The bird made many passes over 5 minutes spent watching it, and at times came close enough to shore that it skimmed the surf. Great binocular views, but sadly my digibin skills couldn’t keep up with the lack of light. If not for all the artificial light there I doubt I even would have noticed it, as I cannot see in the dark.

all the best,
Jonah B.

bay ducks 1/15/20

 

An estimated 3,000 diving ducks (primarily Greater Scaup) and other assorted waterfowl/Grebes are in several big rafts at the county line between San Francisco and San Mateo.

This is an annual mid winter occurrence but definitely worth taking in before these flocks move off or disperse as well as an opportunity to find less common diving ducks in the mix.

Good vantage points for San Francisco birders are from Candlestick State Recreation Area main parking lot, candlestick point and Last Port. A bit tougher for San Mateo, with no publicly accessible sites I'm aware of besides walking along the shoreline at low tide from Candlestick SRA "Last Port" unit.
Most of the birds are however technically south of the county line in San Mateo hence the post to both lists.

Scope absolutely essential to observe/count/sort through all but the closest rafts.

Dominik Mosur
San Francisco

Black Skimmer

Dan Harris
 

Continuing at same spot as yesterday at 12:05p. Right side of main trail on long, narrow rocky peninsula between bay and inlet. 
--
—Dan

Re: Wilson's warblers on Rosemary

 

Hi Barbara,

I suspect you're probably seeing Lesser or American Goldfinches. They too are small yellowish birds with black caps.

They likelihood of seeing "3 (or more)"!! Wilson's Warblers in Northern California mid-winter is extremely low and I dare say unheard of.

Even when this species is moving through at peak migration (April-May and again August-September) seeing multiple birds together away from good habitat is unusual in the City.

Dominik


On Jan 15, 2020, at 10:33, Barbara London via Groups.Io <sfcraig2005@...> wrote:

We have had 3 (or more) wilson's warblers visit our yard (outer, outer Parkside) and they really like our rosemary shrubs.   We have the shorter, prostrating (but not prostrate) forms of this plant. We have seen these birds in our yard in December.   I was under the impression that these birds are not in San Francisco during the winter.  Easy to recognize with their black caps and yellowish bodies.

Re: Wilson's warblers on Rosemary

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

HI Barbara. Thanks for Posting your sighting here. You are right, Wilson’s Warbler would be very rare in winter in SF. As well it would be unusual for them to feed in Rosemary. The bird that is common on Rosemary and fits the description is Lesser Goldfinch. They are yellowish with dark caps, at least the males. Have a look and see if that makes sense. If not, snap a photo and post it.

  Good birding!

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: SFBirds@groups.io <SFBirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Barbara London via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 10:34 AM
To: SFBirds@groups.io
Cc: SFBirds@groups.io
Subject: [SFBirds] Wilson's warblers on Rosemary

 

We have had 3 (or more) wilson's warblers visit our yard (outer, outer Parkside) and they really like our rosemary shrubs.   We have the shorter, prostrating (but not prostrate) forms of this plant. We have seen these birds in our yard in December.   I was under the impression that these birds are not in San Francisco during the winter.  Easy to recognize with their black caps and yellowish bodies.

Wilson's warblers on Rosemary

Barbara London
 

We have had 3 (or more) wilson's warblers visit our yard (outer, outer Parkside) and they really like our rosemary shrubs.   We have the shorter, prostrating (but not prostrate) forms of this plant. We have seen these birds in our yard in December.   I was under the impression that these birds are not in San Francisco during the winter.  Easy to recognize with their black caps and yellowish bodies.

SF bayside: No place for old bunnies.

bitanangan
 

Hi Birders,
     This morning at Yosemite Slough Restoration an early F,M pair of Barn Swallows were foraging above the garden pond. Also watched an unattended/feral dog (stocky, orange-brown) chase (at high speed) a jack rabbit, and that after it forced about 20 geese into flight. It appeared the rabbit may have been too quick for the dog and quite possibly made it to the fence and maybe beneath it to the safety of the shipyard. A second unattended dog, an extremely porky white pit bull, watched from the plateau. These animals may be living at a nearby homeless camp and are not the same unleashed dogs that live at the corner of Thomas and Griffith. This, after watching several evocative episodes of The Hunt with David Attenborough last night. Anyway this park is a worsening mess: busted main gate allowing in trucks and cars, muddy tire ruts, motocross track and dumped trash. The city’s last, remaining Black-tailed Jackrabbits residing mainly at CSRA and in the adjacent shipyard seem doomed to local extirpation. I question the state of California’s ability to manage this otherwise unique and interesting park, indeed it appears that State Parks is no longer trying! 
     Logan Kahle’s Black Skimmer was still visible at 1 PM at Heron’s Head resting near a tidal outlet-channel.
     Hillpoint park has a banded immature Redtail: purple K27. Photo on ebird.
Russ Bright
SF