Date   
Re: Diving birds?

Peter Pyle
 

Hi Mila - There are some more splashes at 2:48 and 3:15-20. My best guess would be sea lions given the pattern to the splashes and apparent rate of movement through the water. Nice short - good ending!

Peter

At 08:03 PM 10/7/2019, Mila Zinkova wrote:
Hi everybody,

Tonight I was filming sunset mirage, and mirage of Farallon Islands to the left of the sun. At 2:06 into the video there are some splashes in the water. Do you believe these could have been made by diving pelicans or terns? See them?
What do you think?
<https://youtu.be/TZfxjT9EkCY>https://youtu.be/TZfxjT9EkCY
Thank you!

Sequoia Audubon and Santa Clara Audubon present: Jeffrey Gordon, President of ABA, Friday, October 11.

Leslie Flint
 

Jeffrey Gordon, President of the American Birding Association
“It’s Too Late to Stop Now:  Sharing the Gospel of Birding in the 21st Century”

Friday, October 11, 2019, 7 pm
Belmont Sports Conference Center
550 Island Parkway, Belmont, CA 94001

Join us for a humorous, heartfelt, and opinionated look at the joys, virtues and occasional frustrations of a life spent birding, the road we’ve explored together, and what lies ahead.  American Birding Association President, Jeffrey Gordon, will celebrate the power of birding to heal and transform, not only our own lives but even our world.  Jeff will share some of the highlights of the ABA’s first half century and experiences from his own 40+ years as a birder.  Most of all he will talk about the path to 2069:  how we advance boldly toward making the world better for the birds and birders who will follow us.

ADA Accessible.  Less than a mile from Belmont Caltrain.  
Free to the public.  Donations accepted.

See you there!

Leslie Flint
San Mateo

8 Warbler Sp.’s at North Lake GGP

Mike Carozza
 

Quick note on an 8 warbler day at N. Lake GGP

-MACGILLIVRAYS (NW Area 1st year)
-CHESTNUT-SIDED (Both sides of lake same 1st yr look)
-BLACK-THROATED GRAY
-YELLOW

Along with Yellowthroat, Orange-crowned, Yellow-rumped, Townsend’s

Red-breasted Nuthatches calling frequently. 

-MC
--
Mike Carozza
914-475-9355

C Merganser & C-c Sparrow

Brian Fitch
 

I spent some time at the Sutro Baths today, despite the failure of the predicted winds to materialize yet again.  A few duck species were moving, the highlight being Common Merganser, with one male and two apparent females together and two males flying with pintail.  Northern Pintail flocks were 10 and 25, Greater Scaup only one flock of 15, and there were several small groups of Surf Scoters.  No geese at all.  The three regular loons, a handful of distant phalarope sp. and a few Parasitics were also out there.

I later found a small mixed flock just south of the Beach Chalet that included a Clay-colored Sparrow, a hybrid flicker, and a Western Tanager (by "hewee?" call) that was very bright yellow-green on the undersides and head, but light gray on the wing, with no apparent wingbars.

Brian Fitch


Local Interest - Orchard Oriole at Fort Mason

David Assmann
 

The ORCHARD ORIOLE continues in the Fort Mason Community Garden, now entering its 3rd week.  Otherwise, just a handful of migrants - 3 WESTERN TANAGERS, 2 ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS, a WESTERN/PACIFIC SLOPE FLYCATCHER, a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, a YELLOW WARBLER, 3 TOWNSEND'S WARBLERS, and 38 YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS. The WANDERING TATTLER was on the pier in Aquatic Park. A HUTTON'S VIREO was in one of the bird baths in the garden.

Re: 8 Warbler Sp.’s at North Lake GGP

Teale Fristoe
 

Mike's Chestnut-sided warbler continues at North lake. It was just seen on the west side of the lake both north and south of the wooden bridge.

Happy migration,
Teale Fristoe
Berkeley

On Wed, Oct 9, 2019, 11:37 AM Mike Carozza <mike.carozza@...> wrote:
Quick note on an 8 warbler day at N. Lake GGP

-MACGILLIVRAYS (NW Area 1st year)
-CHESTNUT-SIDED (Both sides of lake same 1st yr look)
-BLACK-THROATED GRAY
-YELLOW

Along with Yellowthroat, Orange-crowned, Yellow-rumped, Townsend’s

Red-breasted Nuthatches calling frequently. 

-MC
--
Mike Carozza
914-475-9355

Blackburnian on Log Cabin Trail 10/10

Nancy Palmer
 

Most likely continuing bird. Spotted in trees behind barbecue area at 9:50 this morning. See fuzzy ID photos below. ;)
Happy Birding!

Nancy Palmer
San Francisco

Battery Godfrey; 10/10

Brian Fitch
 

All night easterlies gave some of us hope of good bird movement today, but results were less exciting than we wished for.  Sightings of interest included:

Greater White-fronted Goose - 1, and 5 over Marin
Cackling Goose - 7 with 5 White-fronts over Marin
Canada Goose - apparent Lessers, with small beaks and small dark bodies, a little too large for Cacklers
Gadwall - 3
American Wigeon - a few
Northern Shoveler -  "  "
Northern Pintail - few flocks
Greater Scaup - "  "
Surf Scoter - "  "
Common Merganser - 2 F
American White Pelican - flock of 21 spotted by Joachim Gonzalez; only the 2nd time I've seen the species from BG
Osprey - 3
Northern Harrier - 1
Sharp-shinned, Cooper's, Red-sh, & Red-tailed Hawks - a few each
American Kestrel - 1
Merlin - 1
Black-bellied Plover - 2 through the Gate
Killdeer - flock of 19
Red-breasted Sapsucker - 2
Northern Flicker - orange, yellow, and mixed
Cassin's Vireo - 1
Varied Thrush - 10+
American Pipit - 150+
prob Clay-colored Sparrow - flyby small sparrow with unstreaked pale undersides
Western Meadowlark - flock of 18, mult. others

Brian Fitch

Mallard Lake — local interest

Daniel Scali
 

Hi there,

Had a few decent fall/winter birds — Varied Thrush, Flicker, Lincoln’s Sparrow, and at least 2 adult plumage male Common Yellowthroats — at Mallard Lake this afternoon. Mostly along the south side.

Good cold-weather birding (soon)
Dan Scali

Birding in Tahoe Area

Brandy Deminna Ford
 

Good Morning SF Birders,

I am heading to Tahoe for a few days and wanted to reach out to the group before leaving to see if anyone has been birding there recently. If anyone can recommend birding spots I would greatly appreciate it!

I am so glad to be a member of this group! I have seen such beautiful birds over the last weeks and met some great birders.

Thanks all,

Brandy Deminna Ford
San Francisco 

Fort Mason - Lark Sparrow, Orchard Oriole, Gray Flycatcher, Lewis's Woodpecker, Palm Warbler

David Assmann
 

A great day for migrants at Fort Mason yesterday. A LARK SPARROW was on the west side of the garden, the young male ORCHARD ORIOLE was hanging out with a newly arrived HOODED ORIOLE, and a PALM WARBLER was on the grass in front of the chapel.  Several SAVANNAH SPARROWS were in with the many WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS. A LINCOLN'S SPARROW was in the middle of the garden. A PEREGRINE FALCON was chasing another PEREGRINE FALCON. Wave after wave of WESTERN MEADOWLARKS were moving through - at least 125 in total, including one flock of more than 70. I returned to Fort Mason after lunch after hearing that Oscar Moss had a GRAY FLYCATCHER and a LEWIS'S WOODPECKER. Both were on the west side of the garden.

Fort Mason Common Poorwill, Lewis's Woodpecker

David Assmann
 

Yesterday's highlight (in addition to what I posted earlier) at Fort Mason was a COMMON POORWILL that was trying to get some sleep on the ground in the garden.  It was flushed several times (due to foot traffic) and was not there this morning. What was at Fort Mason this morning was a LEWIS'S WOODPECKER in the Battery; a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, 3 SAVANNAH SPARROWS, 2 HOODED ORIOLES, an intergrade NORTHERN FLICKER, and 1 ORCHARD ORIOLE in the garden; and 15 MARBLED GODWITS flying east over the Bay.  Birding at Fort Mason will be difficult until Monday, since there is no parking due to Fleet Week.

Re: Fort Mason Common Poorwill, Lewis's Woodpecker

Joe Morlan
 

Interesting. Two subspecies of Common Poorwill occur in California. The
one that breeds in the Bay Area is nominate californicus. But yours looks
more like nuttalli which breeds in the Great Basin. Californicus is the
color of leaf litter while nuttalli is the color of granite.

On Fri, 11 Oct 2019 14:43:03 -0700, "David Assmann via Groups.Io"
<david_assmann=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Yesterday's highlight (in addition to what I posted earlier) at Fort Mason was a COMMON POORWILL that was trying to get some sleep on the ground in the garden.  It was flushed several times (due to foot traffic) and was not there this morning. What was at Fort Mason this morning was a LEWIS'S WOODPECKER in the Battery; a
WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, 3 SAVANNAH SPARROWS, 2 HOODED ORIOLES, an intergrade NORTHERN FLICKER, and 1 ORCHARD ORIOLE in the garden; and 15 MARBLED GODWITS flying east over the Bay.  Birding at Fort Mason will be difficult until Monday, since there is no parking due to Fleet Week.

--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA

North Lake Friday

rosita94598
 

I had just over 1/2 hour to check the west side of North Lake yesterday Oct. 11, hoping to see the Chestnut-sided Warbler.  That did not work, but had a couple of other good sightings.  North of the wooden bridge, I saw first a female Ring-necked Duck come around a small island, then finally a total of 7 of them.  They seemed very nervous and left almost right away.  I also heard a Belted Kingfisher, then saw it flying the length of the pond north to south.  It was, in fact, a Queenfisher; and it was hotly pursued by a Cooper's Hawk.  As I returned toward the car, I did hear a Kingfisher rattle, so I felt relieved.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek

Black and White Warbler @ Strawberry Hill

Ken Moy
 

Starting around 9 working its way from bottom to top of Falls. Female. Also, several black throated grays

Strawberry Hill hazard

Ken Moy
 

The middle path upslope from the pavilion has a significant deadfall hazard that is not yet cordoned off. Be watchful.

Rare Raptors

Brian Fitch
 

In the last 30 minutes, I've had Broad-winged and Ferruginous Hawks moving south on vectors east of Buena Vista and Corona, and just now another Prairie Falcon soaring SW over Corona.  All were apparent juvs.  Back to the watch...

Brian Fitch

Re: Rare Raptors

Brian Fitch
 

From late morning onward I'd been checking the sky east and west of my home (no N or S view here), and finally, a little before 1 PM, a TV soared past.  So I stopped my tasks and sat down to watch westward over BV and Corona just as the light morph juvenile Broad-winged popped up from the back of trees in the Davies Med Center and swept south, low, and well east of Corona.  A short while later, a very pale Ferruginous Hawk (therefore likely a juv) blasted by above me, right over the intersection of 14th & Noe.  Before 1:30, a big-appearing falcon came into view, soaring in broad circles over the east side of BV, lazily working south at a greater distance than the others.  It took a while to confirm the brown dorsal color and messy ventral markings, but eventually, I got decent views of the pale underwings and dark axillaries.  It also harassed a local Red-tailed for good size comps, as I was still uncertain of exactly how big it was until then.  The brown (vs. tan) upperparts and streaky belly again point to a juvenile.

I watched from around 12:55 to 2:30, when most birds stopped flying except ravens and local R-t's.  The count by that time included the above mentioned, 13 migrant Red-taileds, 6 Cooper's, a distant likely Sharpie, 2 TV's, an Osprey, and a juv Northern Harrier, adding up to one of the best short hawkwatches I've had from the house.  The Ferrug was new for the city year list and a house lifer, while the Prairie was (ridiculously) only new for the house.

While I'm at it, I'll report late on yesterday's strange watch at Battery Godfrey.  Not a single goose appeared, which shouldn't be possible on a clear October day with easterlies, and several other normal migrants were sparse as well.  But ducks made up for the lack, with Lucas Stephenson spotting an adult male White-winged Scoter and a female Black Scoter, each in separate Surf flocks, put an ID on the Long-tailed Duck I found but couldn't see clearly, and tossed in a fly-away Lewis's Woodpecker for good measure.  I'd never met Lucas and Mark before, so it was a fun intro.  It's been fascinating to finally meet and work with a number of the local teen birders these past three active weeks (Oscar, Joachim, Max's B & L, Lucas S, and of course Jonah, who I'd already met several years ago).  If they keep at it, the future of local birding is in good hands, and good eyes, with the type of acuity I miss from my youth.

Brian Fitch


On Sat, Oct 12, 2019 at 1:34 PM Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:
In the last 30 minutes, I've had Broad-winged and Ferruginous Hawks moving south on vectors east of Buena Vista and Corona, and just now another Prairie Falcon soaring SW over Corona.  All were apparent juvs.  Back to the watch...

Brian Fitch

Raptors and F-18s

Richard Bradus
 

Thank you Brian Fitch!

I thought I was crazy but, shortly after arriving at Alta Plaza Park around 1 pm to watch the Blue Angels, I looked up and saw a hawk flying due south in a slight dihedral. Thinking "Red-tail" as they are the typical sighting, I was flabbergasted when I saw what looked like an almost completely pale underbody and wing with just a bit of dark "elbow" marks and dark wing tips, apparently un-banded tail - and no patagial stripe! It seems almost certain that this was the same Ferruginous that Brian reported flying over Buena Vista just a short time later.

Interestingly, after the Blue Angels started roaring overhead, a pair of Red-tails actually flew about just to the northwest of the park, putting on a display of their own with tandem flight and then circling each other with talons out. And a bit later an immature Red-tail flew over, due south in the same course as the Ferrug., plus an adult Red-shouldered  - all seemingly ignoring the screaming jets in our midst (and totally unlike my experiences in past years atop Hawk Hill when the raptors seems disappear when the jets scream into the area).

And, despite the noise and geopolitical ramifications, the air show was pretty good too.

Wow!

Richard Bradus
San francisco

Yellow Headed Blackbird

David Assmann
 

Just flew over Crissy Lagoon