Date   
Sequoia Audubon and Santa Clara Audubon present: Jeffrey Gordon, President of ABA, Friday, October 11.

Leslie Flint
 

Jeffrey Gordon, President of the American Birding Association
“It’s Too Late to Stop Now:  Sharing the Gospel of Birding in the 21st Century”

Friday, October 11, 2019, 7 pm
Belmont Sports Conference Center
550 Island Parkway, Belmont, CA 94001

Join us for a humorous, heartfelt, and opinionated look at the joys, virtues and occasional frustrations of a life spent birding, the road we’ve explored together, and what lies ahead.  American Birding Association President, Jeffrey Gordon, will celebrate the power of birding to heal and transform, not only our own lives but even our world.  Jeff will share some of the highlights of the ABA’s first half century and experiences from his own 40+ years as a birder.  Most of all he will talk about the path to 2069:  how we advance boldly toward making the world better for the birds and birders who will follow us.

ADA Accessible.  Less than a mile from Belmont Caltrain.  
Free to the public.  Donations accepted.

See you there!

Leslie Flint
San Mateo

Re: Diving birds?

Peter Pyle
 

Hi Mila - There are some more splashes at 2:48 and 3:15-20. My best guess would be sea lions given the pattern to the splashes and apparent rate of movement through the water. Nice short - good ending!

Peter

At 08:03 PM 10/7/2019, Mila Zinkova wrote:
Hi everybody,

Tonight I was filming sunset mirage, and mirage of Farallon Islands to the left of the sun. At 2:06 into the video there are some splashes in the water. Do you believe these could have been made by diving pelicans or terns? See them?
What do you think?
<https://youtu.be/TZfxjT9EkCY>https://youtu.be/TZfxjT9EkCY
Thank you!

Diving birds?

Mila Zinkova
 

Hi everybody,

Tonight I was filming sunset mirage, and mirage of Farallon Islands to the left of the sun. At 2:06 into the video there are some splashes in the water. Do you believe these could have been made by diving pelicans or terns? See them?
What do you think?
https://youtu.be/TZfxjT9EkCY 
Thank you!

Local Interest - Fort Mason, etc.

David Assmann
 

Had my first AMERICAN WIGEONS of the season at Heron's Head Park yesterday. At Lake Merced, there were still nine RED-NECKED PHALAROPES. I saw 12 SNOWY PLOVERS on Ocean Beach. This morning the ORCHARD ORIOLE was visible shortly after dawn in the Fort Mason Community Garden, but disappeared after 7:20, and I wasn't able to find it later. YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER numbers continue to climb at Fort Mason, with at least 50 today. WESTERN MEADOWLARKS kept landing in trees - there were at least 15 moving through. Other sightings included a CHIPPING SPARROW, a SAVANNAH SPARROW, 6+ WESTERN TANAGERS, 4 ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS, a WARBLING VIREO, a PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER, and my fos RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER at Fort Mason (a few days late).

Miscellaneous Battery Godfrey sightings, 10/5-6/19

Paul Saraceni
 

I birded Battery Godfrey for a few hours with other birders yesterday morning and this morning, with intermittent east winds each morning and a smattering of migrants.


This morning I was present for the early shift (6:45-10 AM), joined thereafter by Brian F., Hugh C., Joachim, and Jonah B.  I'm sure they will post their species/numbers from then and the rest of the day on eBirds or here. 


Just after 7 AM I observed a flyover HORNED LARK, seen and heard calling as it flew E over the Battery and towards Ft. Scott.  Later after some the other birders arrived I briefly observed a first-fall female BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER near the top of the large cypress in front of the Battery.  Unfortunately I could not get the others on it before it dropped down into the center tangle of the cypress and could not be relocated.  


Other nice sighting this morning while I was present, first spotted by Joachim, was a high-flying flock of 5 GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE heading E.


This morning there were good numbers of Greater Scaup (150+ while I was there), Am. Pipits, Vaux's Swifts, Violet-green Swallows, and Yellow-rumped Warblers, plus small numbers of Varied Thrush, Band-tailed Pigeons, Western Meadowlarks, Northern Flickers, and Red-breasted Nuthatches on the move.  Local interest species included single House and Bewick's Wrens, and a Northern Mockingbird.


Yesterday, with Hugh, we observed 5 CACKLING GEESE (3 & 2 "Aleutians") plus a GR. WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE, and an ACORN WOODPECKER heading N.


Good numbers of PARASITIC JAEGERS, including some high-flying individuals, were present both mornings.


Paul Saraceni

San Francisco 

Re: Juv Bald Eagle at HSB?

J.R. Blair
 

That sure looks like the same bird. Thanks, Teale


On Oct 5, 2019, at 2:19 PM, Teale Fristoe <fristoe@...> wrote:

This morning I was up at Hawk Hill and we saw a juvenile Bald Eagle fly south around 10:45. Maybe this is the same bird you saw? I got a picture which is in my ebird checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60371648

Happy migration,
Teale Fristoe
Berkeley

On Sat, Oct 5, 2019 at 11:20 AM J.R. Blair <jrblair20@...> wrote:
The photos are poor. Here’s a description. Large raptor with broad wings and shortish, broad tail. Mostly dark with white leading edges on the underwings. Large head. Soaring with wings flat aspect.
> On Oct 5, 2019, at 11:08 AM, J.R. Blair via Groups.Io <jrblair20=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> No bins on hand but I’m pretty sure a juvenile Bald Eagle was just soaring over the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival (Banjo Stage). Got photos with my phone that I will send when I figure out how
>
> J.R. Blair
>
>
>



Re: Juv Bald Eagle at HSB?

Teale Fristoe
 

This morning I was up at Hawk Hill and we saw a juvenile Bald Eagle fly south around 10:45. Maybe this is the same bird you saw? I got a picture which is in my ebird checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60371648

Happy migration,
Teale Fristoe
Berkeley


On Sat, Oct 5, 2019 at 11:20 AM J.R. Blair <jrblair20@...> wrote:
The photos are poor. Here’s a description. Large raptor with broad wings and shortish, broad tail. Mostly dark with white leading edges on the underwings. Large head. Soaring with wings flat aspect.
> On Oct 5, 2019, at 11:08 AM, J.R. Blair via Groups.Io <jrblair20=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> No bins on hand but I’m pretty sure a juvenile Bald Eagle was just soaring over the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival (Banjo Stage). Got photos with my phone that I will send when I figure out how
>
> J.R. Blair
>
>
>



Re: Juv Bald Eagle at HSB?

J.R. Blair
 

The photos are poor. Here’s a description. Large raptor with broad wings and shortish, broad tail. Mostly dark with white leading edges on the underwings. Large head. Soaring with wings flat aspect.

On Oct 5, 2019, at 11:08 AM, J.R. Blair via Groups.Io <jrblair20=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

No bins on hand but I’m pretty sure a juvenile Bald Eagle was just soaring over the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival (Banjo Stage). Got photos with my phone that I will send when I figure out how

J.R. Blair


Juv Bald Eagle at HSB?

J.R. Blair
 

No bins on hand but I’m pretty sure a juvenile Bald Eagle was just soaring over the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival (Banjo Stage). Got photos with my phone that I will send when I figure out how

J.R. Blair

Re: Late report: Sapsucker on Log Cabin Trail on 10/4

Dominik Mosur
 

Hi Ken,

There's been a couple of Red-breasted Sapsuckers hanging around the log cabin trail for a couple of weeks now. Late September is a typical arrival date for them here on the coast. Ones that find good feeding areas as birds in this Eastern Golden Gate Park often do, they can remain through the winter and into April.

Dominik




On Oct 5, 2019, at 06:48, Ken Moy <ken.moy62@...> wrote:

Sorry for the late report, Nancy Palmer &I spotted a sapsucker on  large tree with green/red/brown foliage on the portion of the log cabin trail that is adjacent to the meadow east of the log cabin meadow on Friday, 10/4 around 11:30.Thanks to Nancy for the attached pic. I leave it for the SFBirds community to opine on its provenance and status.

See you on the trail!

Ken Moy
<Sapsucker.jpg>

Late report: Sapsucker on Log Cabin Trail on 10/4

Ken Moy
 

Sorry for the late report, Nancy Palmer &I spotted a sapsucker on  large tree with green/red/brown foliage on the portion of the log cabin trail that is adjacent to the meadow east of the log cabin meadow on Friday, 10/4 around 11:30.Thanks to Nancy for the attached pic. I leave it for the SFBirds community to opine on its provenance and status.

See you on the trail!

Ken Moy

Orchard Oriole and Greater White Fronted Goose

David Assmann
 

The ORCHARD ORIOLE continues in the Fort Mason Community Garden for the 10th day. YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS are starting to arrive in larger numbers - had 27 at Fort Mason this morning, and only one YELLOW WARBLER. At Crissy Field, a GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was on the field with CANADA GEESE, and then flew over to the lagoon.

Re: Broad wingeds

Brian Fitch
 

A 45 minute watch from Corona turned up 2 Turkey Vultures, 2 juv Northern Harriers, a single Sharp-shinned Hawk, 9 Cooper's Hawks, including 4 together kettling, 1 migrant Red-shouldered, the previously mentioned 3 Broad-wingeds, 3 migrant Red-taileds, and a few distant buteos and accipiters.  Plus a single Vaux's Swift.  I hiked up there because while eating lunch at home, I saw several TV's and Coops and another harrier over Buena Vista.  There were also multiple raptors flying over Golden Gate Park while a number of us were trying to track the various vagrants around Stow Lake.  The flyovers included yet another harrier, 7 or more TV's, multiple Cooper's, Red-shouldereds, and Red-taileds and 2 Merlins.

I started the morning at Stow, quickly ran into Ken, and we covered Strawberry Hill for a while without seeing any unusuals, though we had 6 warbler species before reaching the top.  We then found a Hermit Warbler just as Derek and Cris Heins walked up, and Cris had already photographed the Hermit and the hybrid Townsend's x Hermit.  The two birds then hung out close together for a few minutes providing a fun study.  I was briefly alone when the Summer showed up just north of the waterfall, a big yellow-gold tanager with no wing bars.  After I called out, the others had brief views at distance just as she flew down toward the lake, not to be seen again while I was present.   Derek also spotted some Vaux's flying over the hilltop, but otherwise, things calmed down, and none of the earlier rarities put in appearances.

Brian Fitch


On Fri, Oct 4, 2019 at 1:34 PM Brian Fitch via Groups.Io <fogeggs=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

3 broad winged hawks have passed over Buena Vista or corona heights in the last few minutes
1 35 pm
Brian fitch

Broad wingeds

Brian Fitch
 

3 broad winged hawks have passed over Buena Vista or corona heights in the last few minutes
1 35 pm
Brian fitch

Summer tanager

Brian Fitch
 

Still near the falls on strawberry hill stow lake golden gate park
Actively flycatching and not very cooperative
Brian fitch

Re: BWWA

Chris Vance
 

Sorry for the mistake. It was a hurried post and a lesson learned.
Take care,
Chris

Virus-free. www.avast.com

On Thu, Oct 3, 2019 at 9:59 PM Dario Taraborelli <dario.taraborelli@...> wrote:
Since Peter brought up the topic of 4-letter codes, the data nerds among you may like to know that we recently ingested all the 2000+ species-level IBP codes in Wikidata (Wikipedia’s companion knowledge base). 

When in doubt, you can look up the code alongside many other unique identifiers, metadata, and lists of bird common names across hundreds of languages. For example, this is the entry for the Black-and-White Warbler: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q669888

Dario

On Oct 3, 2019, at 21:03, Aaron Maizlish <aaron.maizlish@...> wrote:

BAWA is actually the code for Bachman's Warbler.  Now that would have me running out the door!

Aaron Maizlish

On Thu, Oct 3, 2019 at 8:59 PM Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
Sorry yes BAWW. P

On Oct 3, 2019, at 20:37, Frank Fogarty <fogartyfa@...> wrote:

Isn’t the code for Black-and-White Warbler BAWW?

On Thu, Oct 3, 2019 at 7:57 PM Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
Dave DeSante would like me to relay the following re use of
four-letter codes, to please try and use the correct ones. He was out
the door for a Blue-winged Warbler, but then read the message below
(via Sialia). The correct code for Black-and-white Warbler is BAWA
(<https://www.birdpop.org/pages/birdSpeciesCodes.php>https://www.birdpop.org/pages/birdSpeciesCodes.php).

I would add that I'm a big fan of these codes and use them frequently
in eBird reports, but always after mentioning the full name first (or
in comments under a full-named species) and would encourage this
practice in SF Birds subject lines and text.

Good birding all,

Peter

At 12:53 PM 10/3/2019, Chris Vance wrote:

>Black and white warbler at Strawberry Hill.
>11:45.  Looking NE from falls in bare tree.
>Good birding!
>Chris Vance
>
>





Virus-free. www.avast.com

Re: BWWA

Dario Taraborelli
 

Since Peter brought up the topic of 4-letter codes, the data nerds among you may like to know that we recently ingested all the 2000+ species-level IBP codes in Wikidata (Wikipedia’s companion knowledge base). 

When in doubt, you can look up the code alongside many other unique identifiers, metadata, and lists of bird common names across hundreds of languages. For example, this is the entry for the Black-and-White Warbler: https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q669888

Dario

On Oct 3, 2019, at 21:03, Aaron Maizlish <aaron.maizlish@...> wrote:

BAWA is actually the code for Bachman's Warbler.  Now that would have me running out the door!

Aaron Maizlish

On Thu, Oct 3, 2019 at 8:59 PM Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
Sorry yes BAWW. P

On Oct 3, 2019, at 20:37, Frank Fogarty <fogartyfa@...> wrote:

Isn’t the code for Black-and-White Warbler BAWW?

On Thu, Oct 3, 2019 at 7:57 PM Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
Dave DeSante would like me to relay the following re use of
four-letter codes, to please try and use the correct ones. He was out
the door for a Blue-winged Warbler, but then read the message below
(via Sialia). The correct code for Black-and-white Warbler is BAWA
(<https://www.birdpop.org/pages/birdSpeciesCodes.php>https://www.birdpop.org/pages/birdSpeciesCodes.php).

I would add that I'm a big fan of these codes and use them frequently
in eBird reports, but always after mentioning the full name first (or
in comments under a full-named species) and would encourage this
practice in SF Birds subject lines and text.

Good birding all,

Peter

At 12:53 PM 10/3/2019, Chris Vance wrote:

>Black and white warbler at Strawberry Hill.
>11:45.  Looking NE from falls in bare tree.
>Good birding!
>Chris Vance
>
>




Re: BWWA

Aaron Maizlish
 

BAWA is actually the code for Bachman's Warbler.  Now that would have me running out the door!

Aaron Maizlish


On Thu, Oct 3, 2019 at 8:59 PM Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
Sorry yes BAWW. P

On Oct 3, 2019, at 20:37, Frank Fogarty <fogartyfa@...> wrote:

Isn’t the code for Black-and-White Warbler BAWW?

On Thu, Oct 3, 2019 at 7:57 PM Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
Dave DeSante would like me to relay the following re use of
four-letter codes, to please try and use the correct ones. He was out
the door for a Blue-winged Warbler, but then read the message below
(via Sialia). The correct code for Black-and-white Warbler is BAWA
(<https://www.birdpop.org/pages/birdSpeciesCodes.php>https://www.birdpop.org/pages/birdSpeciesCodes.php).

I would add that I'm a big fan of these codes and use them frequently
in eBird reports, but always after mentioning the full name first (or
in comments under a full-named species) and would encourage this
practice in SF Birds subject lines and text.

Good birding all,

Peter

At 12:53 PM 10/3/2019, Chris Vance wrote:

>Black and white warbler at Strawberry Hill.
>11:45.  Looking NE from falls in bare tree.
>Good birding!
>Chris Vance
>
>




Re: BWWA

Peter Pyle
 

Sorry yes BAWW. P

On Oct 3, 2019, at 20:37, Frank Fogarty <fogartyfa@...> wrote:

Isn’t the code for Black-and-White Warbler BAWW?

On Thu, Oct 3, 2019 at 7:57 PM Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
Dave DeSante would like me to relay the following re use of
four-letter codes, to please try and use the correct ones. He was out
the door for a Blue-winged Warbler, but then read the message below
(via Sialia). The correct code for Black-and-white Warbler is BAWA
(<https://www.birdpop.org/pages/birdSpeciesCodes.php>https://www.birdpop.org/pages/birdSpeciesCodes.php).

I would add that I'm a big fan of these codes and use them frequently
in eBird reports, but always after mentioning the full name first (or
in comments under a full-named species) and would encourage this
practice in SF Birds subject lines and text.

Good birding all,

Peter

At 12:53 PM 10/3/2019, Chris Vance wrote:

>Black and white warbler at Strawberry Hill.
>11:45.  Looking NE from falls in bare tree.
>Good birding!
>Chris Vance
>
>




Re: BWWA

Frank Fogarty
 

Isn’t the code for Black-and-White Warbler BAWW?

On Thu, Oct 3, 2019 at 7:57 PM Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
Dave DeSante would like me to relay the following re use of
four-letter codes, to please try and use the correct ones. He was out
the door for a Blue-winged Warbler, but then read the message below
(via Sialia). The correct code for Black-and-white Warbler is BAWA
(<https://www.birdpop.org/pages/birdSpeciesCodes.php>https://www.birdpop.org/pages/birdSpeciesCodes.php).

I would add that I'm a big fan of these codes and use them frequently
in eBird reports, but always after mentioning the full name first (or
in comments under a full-named species) and would encourage this
practice in SF Birds subject lines and text.

Good birding all,

Peter

At 12:53 PM 10/3/2019, Chris Vance wrote:

>Black and white warbler at Strawberry Hill.
>11:45.  Looking NE from falls in bare tree.
>Good birding!
>Chris Vance
>
>