Date   
EASTERN PHOEBE Twin Peaks 2/23/2019

 

An Eastern Phoebe perched up in a coyote bush along the trail at north end of Crestline Street/below -southeast of the Twin Peaks Tourist Loop for about 2 minutes just now. It flushed when I tried to approach for a closer look/documentation phonebin image and looked to fly up slope.

I'll be up here for another 15-20 minutes looking and wanted to get the word out. Maybe the bird Josiah had at Lobos Creek making little leaps in habitat locally? Or just a good February for Eastern Phoebes in the City.

Good luck,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco

Re: EASTERN PHOEBE Twin Peaks 2/23/2019

 

Phoebe is hanging out. Disappears for stretches, two Black Phoebes are also at the spot.

It's probably possible to get distant looks from the Twin Peaks walking loop above, but to get better looks try the trail at end of Crestline.

Good Luck,

Dominik

On Feb 23, 2019, at 12:19, Dominik Mosur via Groups.Io <dominikmosur=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

An Eastern Phoebe perched up in a coyote bush along the trail at north end of Crestline Street/below -southeast of the Twin Peaks Tourist Loop for about 2 minutes just now. It flushed when I tried to approach for a closer look/documentation phonebin image and looked to fly up slope.

I'll be up here for another 15-20 minutes looking and wanted to get the word out. Maybe the bird Josiah had at Lobos Creek making little leaps in habitat locally? Or just a good February for Eastern Phoebes in the City.

Good luck,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco


Re: EASTERN PHOEBE Twin Peaks 2/23/2019

Lee-Hong Chang
 

At 2:05 pm, I saw the EASTERN PHOEBE along Crestline Dr. trail (37.75412, -122.44591) behind 140 Gardenside Dr. for about 2 minutes. Then, it disappeared and I could not refind it.

Lee Chang
SF


On Saturday, February 23, 2019, 12:39:52 PM PST, Dominik Mosur <dominikmosur@...> wrote:


Phoebe is hanging out. Disappears for stretches, two Black Phoebes are also at the spot.

It's probably possible to get distant looks from the Twin Peaks walking loop above, but to get better looks try the trail at end of Crestline.

Good Luck,

Dominik
> On Feb 23, 2019, at 12:19, Dominik Mosur via Groups.Io <dominikmosur=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> An Eastern Phoebe perched up in a coyote bush along the trail at north end of Crestline Street/below -southeast of the Twin Peaks Tourist Loop for about 2 minutes just now. It flushed when I tried to approach for a closer look/documentation phonebin image and looked to fly up slope.
>
> I'll be up here for another 15-20 minutes looking and wanted to get the word out. Maybe the bird Josiah had at Lobos Creek making little leaps in habitat locally? Or just a good February for Eastern Phoebes in the City.
>
> Good luck,
> Dominik Mosur
> San Francisco
>
>
>


Long-tailed Duck continues at Baker Beach (24 Feb)

Ken Schneider
 

Currently with scoter raft off north end of beach at 1030.

Good birding!
Ken Schneider 
Noe Valley 

Re: Long-tailed Duck continues at Baker Beach (24 Feb)

Brian Turner
 

LT Duck being seen now, refound by Lee Hong Chang at about 3pm and affording great looks.  In with a large group of scoter flock at north end of Baker Beach by the washed up sailboat. 

Good birding, Brian

On Sun, Feb 24, 2019, 10:28 AM Ken Schneider <kschnei1@...> wrote:
Currently with scoter raft off north end of beach at 1030.

Good birding!
Ken Schneider 
Noe Valley 

Common Gallinule, Lake Merced

Peter Pyle
 

The gallinule, first found by Brian Fitch on 22 Feb, was observed today at about 3:45. It was skirting the back edge of the semi-open area of water about 40 feet west of the NE corner of the concrete bridge, to the left of the bleached white willow snag in the water but to the right of the live willow that comes up to the bridge railing, about 25 feet out from the bridge. When Rudy and I arrived it was being observed by Max Laura and his son Mark, who apparently first spotted the bird, and Jeff Gray. Jeff's and my photos are here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53111316
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53116419

As I wrote in my eBird checklist,

"My guess is a second-cycle bird - examination of photos indicates broad and basic (rather than juvenile) primaries and rectrices but bill shield is dull and not fully developed. By this date in Feb an older bird should have brighter red-and-yellow bill and broader more developed red shield (see photos)."

Flyover Townsend's Solitaire near Tank Hill, 2/24/19

Paul Saraceni
 

This afternoon around 2:45 I was near Tank Hill above Cole Valley and I observed a TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE flying by itself just over the houses near the intersection of Clayton Street & Twin Peaks Boulevard. It showed its boldly-marked underwing and longish tail. It was flying SW and headed out of view in the general direction of Twin Peaks.


Paul Saraceni

San Francisco

Long Tailed Duck continues

David Assmann
 

Swimming close to shore at Baker Beach

Re: Common Gallinule, Lake Merced

Bob Toleno
 

I saw the Common Gallinule this morning at a little after 7am in exactly the spot that Peter described. It was fairly well hidden in the reeds, so i had to wait until it moved a little before i could find it.

Bob Toleno
Hayward


On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 6:48 PM Peter Pyle <ppyle@...> wrote:
The gallinule, first found by Brian Fitch on 22 Feb, was observed
today at about 3:45. It was skirting the back edge of the semi-open
area of water about 40 feet west of the NE corner of the concrete
bridge, to the left of the bleached white willow snag in the water
but to the right of the live willow that comes up to the bridge
railing, about 25 feet out from the bridge. When Rudy and I arrived
it was being observed by Max Laura and his son Mark, who apparently
first spotted the bird, and Jeff Gray. Jeff's and my photos are here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53111316
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53116419

As I wrote in my eBird checklist,

"My guess is a second-cycle bird - examination of photos indicates
broad and basic (rather than juvenile) primaries and rectrices but
bill shield is dull and not fully developed. By this date in Feb an
older bird should have brighter red-and-yellow bill and broader more
developed red shield (see photos)."






Civic Center Mew Gulls

Smokey Bear
 

Mew Gulls have been a steady presence in Civic Center this winter.
They really like the northeast square of lawn during the rain, and I
count as many as 35 massed up on this one patch, looking for worms or
grubs, I presume. Today there were 20. I'm not sure why but the other
three patches of lawn don't attract them at all. I believe numbers of
Mew Gulls are up sharply this year over the last few years, when I
counted just 5 or so at any one time and only saw them for a few
weeks.

Anna

Orchard Oriole and tree removal at Fort Mason

David Assmann
 

Pretty much the expected birds at Fort Mason this morning with the ORCHARD ORIOLE and a ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER in the garden, a BUFFLEHEAD and a RED-BREASTED MERGANSER in the Aquatic Park, and an ALLEN'S HUMMINGBIRD on the hillside above Aquatic Park. However, a Park Service employee told me that massive tree removal is about to start in the Battery at Fort Mason, with 19 Eucalyptus trees slated for removal between now and March 8th, which will completely change the character of the Battery, and probably will reduce its suitability as a stopover point for migrating birds.

Long Tailed Duck Continues

David Assmann
 

At Baker Beach, but further out than earlier this week.

Re: Orchard Oriole and tree removal at Fort Mason

Bob Hall
 

David: Is the Fort Mason planting plan available somewhere? I think the habitat will actually improve if they plan to replant with coffeeberry, toyons, silk tassel, etc. If you hear of a public meeting on this, please let me know.

Here’s an interesting blurb on toyon from author Kate Marianchild:

"Toyon contributes nectar and pollen for at least 27 native bee species, including leaf cutter and resin bees, digger bees, carpenter bees bumblebees, cellophane bees and mason bees. It provides nectar for hover flies, monarchs, California Sister butterflies, mourning cloaks, Anna’s hummingbird and various beetles and ants. Toyon is the larval host for at least 50 species and it provides seeds and berries for multiple birds, including thrushes, cedar waxwings and finches. Hutton’s vireo, orange-crowned warblers, California towee and several other birds use the tree for nesting."


Since this is a birding sighting forum: robins and waxwings are in huge mobs in my neighbor’s back yards. The most I can remember.

Bob Hall
SF

--
Bob Hall
San Francisco, CA
"There is no better high than discovery." - E.O. Wilson

Eastern Phoebe continues in Twin Peaks Natural Area 2/28/2019

 

Same area as last week, trail from north end of Crestline, or look down from Twin Peaks onto the draw below the restrooms.

Good luck,
Dominik

Long tailed duck and 2 Red-necked grebes

Josiah Clark
 

The long tail duck continues with the flock at the north end of the beach just passed Breakers. Two red-necked 
 grebes were a few hundred yards offshore by the first parking lot.
At a job site in Pacific Heights pine siskins continue to be loyal to a feeder at a 3rd story windows. We did not see the Wilson’s Warbler spotted by Cedric there last month. 

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Red Necked Grebes and Baker Beach

David Assmann
 

A RED-NECKED GREBE offshore at Crissy Field was the first of two this morning - the other was at Baker Beach.  In addition to the LONG-TAILED DUCK at Baker Beach this morning, there was a MARBLED MURRELET, three BLACK SCOTERS (two female and one male) and at least 200 SURF SCOTERS.

Northern and Eastern niceties continue

Richard Bradus
 

Hi all

Had a very successful morning, starting at Baker beach where the continuing Long-tailed Duck made a nice flyby and hung out for a time with a large raft of Surf Scoters (also seen by Max Benningfield, who hopefully got some photos). Two female Black Scoters also remain, seen near the edge of the largest raft, and there were also three species of Loon (though I missed seeing the Red-throateds), and at least one Bewick's Wren singing from above the battery.

Then off to Twin Peaks, where I got lucky having decided to survey from just south of the tourist overlook rather than hiking up. The Eastern Phoebe, which I had initially seen as a flash of white as it flew into cover in the brush, thankfully popped out and worked the scrub slope below for about ten minutes, affording me better views than Lee-Hong Chang who was below on the Crestline trail. It didn't sing but it did give one sharp chip call before it flew out to forage. Despite a dead battery (good thing I carried a spare) and my camera's annoying tendency to focus on the vegetation behind rather than the bird, I did manage to get a couple of decent photos. Interestingly, these show a bit of pale yellow on the belly, which I was not able to appreciate on my initial observation through binoculars. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53265598

Thank you Josiah and Dominik! (and all the subsequent reports) - they are still out there despite the storms. Fun for all!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco

Fort Mason and Crissy Field Local Interest

David Assmann
 

Spent the first half of the morning at Fort Mason, where the ORCHARD ORIOLE continued in the garden. An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER near the west side of the garden was very aggressive, chasing after AMERICAN ROBINS - a behavior I have not observed before. On my way to Crissy Field I stopped at the Yacht Harbor, where four SURFBIRDS foraged on the rocks. At the northwest corner of Crissy Lagoon, two SAVANNAH SPARROWS were in the willows, and on the field I observed several WESTERN MEADOWLARKS and spotted an AMERICAN PIPIT.

Ferry Park (Sue Bierman) - Wilson's Warbler 3-1-19

Jack Hayden
 

The wintering Wilson's Warbler continues at Ferry Park (as of March 1). Among birds currently reported on eBird, this is the most northerly Wilson's along the west coast of the US. Interesting to note there is another Wilson's wintering in British Columbia.

Also present is the continuing White-throated Sparrow and three other warbler species.

eBird report with photos.

Jack Hayden
Albany

Spotted Towhee in Lafayette Park

Allan Ridley
 

A spotted towhee was actively foraging with a group of robins and starlings on the slope north of the concrete walkway opposite the tennis courts.