Date   
Re: Palace of Fine Arts, Four geese species, but departed shortly after 2:00 pm Thursday, Nov. 22

Paul Saraceni
 

Another location for the goose flock is Spreckels Lake in Golden Gate Park -- on Monday (11/19) @ 8:45 AM I observed the 1 Snow Goose, 1 Greater White-fronted Goose, and 9 Cackling Geese there together among many Canada Geese (and American Coots).

A few other species of less-common waterfowl I've observed in SF this week:
Green-winged Teal 3 -- group flying S over the ocean from sea watch on 11/20
Northern Pintail 11 -- group flying SE over north Lake Merced on 11/20
Common Goldeneye 9 -- group flying E past Battery Godfrey on 11/19

Paul Saraceni
San Francisco

On November 22, 2018 at 3:04 PM William Grant <wbgrant@...> wrote:


Cackling Goose - 8; Snow Goose, Greater White-fronted Goose, Canada Goose

Jesse Ellis, arrived at 10:08 am
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50137263

I arrived at 1:42
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50130987

Around 2:05 they flew away.

May be at the Crissy Field Lagoon or elsewhere nearby.

Happy birding,

Bill

Lbbg

Brian Fitch
 

Adult lesser black backed gull at Lawton on beach

Brian fitch

Orioles at Fort Mason yesterday - Orchard and Bullock's

David Assmann
 

The number of Oriole species at Fort Mason this week has climbed to three - yesterday morning I had a very co-operative BULLOCK'S ORIOLE behind building 36W (south of MacArthur) - https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidasf/45291814734/in/dateposted-public/ and what turned out to be an ORCHARD ORIOLE in the garden when I was looking for the Hooded Oriole - https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidasf/31077095877/in/dateposted-public/ Other highlights at Fort Mason included a WESTERN MEADOWLARK flying south over the garden, a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW and a LINCOLN'S SPARROW in the garden, a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH at the entrance to the garden, and a WANDERING TATTLER on the abandoned pier.

Re: Lbbg

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Hi all,

  Is this is a new individual? The other one was a second cycle was it not?

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: SFBirds@groups.io <SFBirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Fitch
Sent: Friday, November 23, 2018 8:54 AM
To: SF Birds <SFBirds@groups.io>
Subject: [SFBirds] Lbbg

 

Adult lesser black backed gull at Lawton on beach

Brian fitch

Re: Lbbg

Brian Fitch
 

I went out to search for Jonah's LBBG today, and instead of re-finding his bird, I found an adult in the flock on Ocean Beach at the foot of Lawton.  White head with fine streaks on crown and nape, a dark smudge in front of the white eye, an unusual red, yellow and pale bill pattern, the mantle a shade darker than the darkest nearby western, 3-4 small white spots at the folded primary tips which I could not see when the bird opened its wings, longer attenuated wings than any nearby California, short yellowish legs, and two healthy looking feet, so not the Farallons bird, which I don't think was an adult anyway.  The bird stayed on the safety of the beach berm, which was being cut off by the rising tide's forming small lagoons between us and the flock. 

I tried a few cell photos, but was saved from that sad attempt by Calvin Lou's arrival, so he obtained photos, and Jim Lomax also joined us after a while.  The rain and wind then increased, and I came home to dry off.

Brian Fitch


On Fri, Nov 23, 2018 at 8:54 AM Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:

Adult lesser black backed gull at Lawton on beach

Brian fitch

Re: Lbbg

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Very nice Brian!

   This species is now becoming way more regular coastally, not sure why, but it is.

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: SFBirds@groups.io <SFBirds@groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Fitch
Sent: Friday, November 23, 2018 9:58 AM
To: SF Birds <SFBirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SFBirds] Lbbg

 

I went out to search for Jonah's LBBG today, and instead of re-finding his bird, I found an adult in the flock on Ocean Beach at the foot of Lawton.  White head with fine streaks on crown and nape, a dark smudge in front of the white eye, an unusual red, yellow and pale bill pattern, the mantle a shade darker than the darkest nearby western, 3-4 small white spots at the folded primary tips which I could not see when the bird opened its wings, longer attenuated wings than any nearby California, short yellowish legs, and two healthy looking feet, so not the Farallons bird, which I don't think was an adult anyway.  The bird stayed on the safety of the beach berm, which was being cut off by the rising tide's forming small lagoons between us and the flock. 

 

I tried a few cell photos, but was saved from that sad attempt by Calvin Lou's arrival, so he obtained photos, and Jim Lomax also joined us after a while.  The rain and wind then increased, and I came home to dry off.

 

Brian Fitch

 

On Fri, Nov 23, 2018 at 8:54 AM Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:

Adult lesser black backed gull at Lawton on beach

Brian fitch

Cassins auklet, about to release it at Sutro baths.

Josiah Clark
 

Just picked up an exhausted Cassins auklet at Pacheco Street. It’s with me in the car now, I’m about to release it at Sutro baths so long as there aren’t too many gulls. Otherwise thinking over by Crissy Field. If any burgers are around and want to see it come by or p.m. me. I am about to meet Cedric at Lawton Street right now.

Lafayette Park Nov. 24 observations

William Grant
 

Greetings,

Lori Lee
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50185915
and I
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50185382

saw a number of interesting birds at Lafayette Park this morning:

Chipping Sparrow (continuing)
Summer Tanager, female (continuing)
Western Tanager
Merlin
Spotted Towhee (continuing)

Happy birding,

Bill

SF City Cumulative List for 2018

H Cotter
 

With the addition of Cassin's Auklet today from Ocean Beach, the addition of Lesser black-backed Gull to the City list this week, the cumulative year list for the City hit 296; one ahead of the previous highest total for a year.
There are still a couple of species under consideration for addition but with five or so weeks left in the year it might be possible to hit 300 for the first time.

List through Oct 31, 2018 is at:


City list is at 424; County list is at 492

Hugh

Re: Cassins auklet - Local wildlife centers

Loretta
 

Hi Josiah,

Sorry I'm just seeing this now, but FYI, the Wildlife Center w/the Peninsula Humane Society would happily take in any orphaned, sick, or injured wildlife that you find. I volunteer there and can tell you that if they can do anything to help an animal, they will.

If they aren't set up to care for that particular animal, they'll transfer it elsewhere, e.g. International Bird Rescue or the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley. 

If you are in the city and you can't bring the animal to the facility, you can call Animal Control, who will do their best to capture/transport the animal to a center. 

Some numbers and addresses (from their webpage above):

PHS/SPCA Wildlife Care Center: 1450 Rollins Rd, Burlingame (650-340-7022)
Palo Alto Animal Services: 3281 E. Bayshore Rd, Palo Alto (650-329-2413)
Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley: 3027 Penitencia Creek Rd, San Jose (408-929-9453)
San Francisco Animal Care & Control: 1200 15th St, San Francisco (415-554-6364)

Thanks and happy birding!

Lorētta Chen


On Saturday, November 24, 2018, 12:44:32 PM PST, Josiah Clark <josiah.clark621@...> wrote:


Just picked up an exhausted Cassins auklet at Pacheco Street. It’s with me in the car now, I’m about to release it at Sutro baths so long as there aren’t too many gulls. Otherwise thinking over by Crissy Field. If any burgers are around and want to see it come by or p.m. me. I am about to meet Cedric at Lawton Street right now.


Re: Cassins auklet - Local wildlife centers

Josiah Clark
 

Dominick and Larreta, In the moment I just wanted to get this bird away from the dogs and masses of gulls. The waves were big and relentless and there was no way it was getting back out on its own today. 
Releasing a stranded bird from the ocean into calmer body of water is a way to give it a fighting chance. I’ve known people who’ve done it successfully with grebes and loons for example.
I do not subscribe to the practice of intensive rehab for wild animals succumbing to  their natural environment.
  In fact nursing these unfit animals back to health so they can breed weakens the gene pool. 
The sad fact is naturally stranding birds and marine mammals are meant to die. 
Interestingly, there is a lot of food (small anchovies) right there  off shore. It’s possible it was lured inshore by abundant food and then was overwhelmed by the surf. 
  Make no mistake though, I really hope this particular Cassin’s Auklet does go on to survive and breed. 

On Nov 24, 2018, at 5:17 PM, Loretta <lchen89@...> wrote:

Hi Josiah,

Sorry I'm just seeing this now, but FYI, the Wildlife Center w/the Peninsula Humane Society would happily take in any orphaned, sick, or injured wildlife that you find. I volunteer there and can tell you that if they can do anything to help an animal, they will.

If they aren't set up to care for that particular animal, they'll transfer it elsewhere, e.g. International Bird Rescue or the Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley. 

If you are in the city and you can't bring the animal to the facility, you can call Animal Control, who will do their best to capture/transport the animal to a center. 

Some numbers and addresses (from their webpage above):

PHS/SPCA Wildlife Care Center: 1450 Rollins Rd, Burlingame (650-340-7022)
Palo Alto Animal Services: 3281 E. Bayshore Rd, Palo Alto (650-329-2413)
Wildlife Center of Silicon Valley: 3027 Penitencia Creek Rd, San Jose (408-929-9453)
San Francisco Animal Care & Control: 1200 15th St, San Francisco (415-554-6364)

Thanks and happy birding!

Lorētta Chen


On Saturday, November 24, 2018, 12:44:32 PM PST, Josiah Clark <josiah.clark621@...> wrote:


Just picked up an exhausted Cassins auklet at Pacheco Street. It’s with me in the car now, I’m about to release it at Sutro baths so long as there aren’t too many gulls. Otherwise thinking over by Crissy Field. If any burgers are around and want to see it come by or p.m. me. I am about to meet Cedric at Lawton Street right now.


Elk Glen Lake, Palm Warbler, G.G.P. Green Winged Teal

Lee Guichan
 

Hello,
This morning at Elk Glen Lake there was one Palm Warbler on the South side of the lake, one female Bufflehead flew into the lake, two American Coots, one Pied-billed Grebe, on the north side, one Lincoln's Sparrow was with a small flock of  White-crowns, Song Sparrows, & Golden-crowned Sparrows, two Yellow-rumped Warblers, one Hutton's Vireo, one California Towhee, two Ruby Crowned Kinglets, 11 Bushtits, two Stellar's Jays,one Red-tailed Hawk, one Coopers Hawk, & heard one Northern Flicker.

Lloyd Lake, in the afternoon there were nine (6 females, 3 males) Hooded Mergansers were active, one Green-winged Teal, one White-throated Sparrow, two Fox Sparrows, 6 Dark-eyed Juncos,
5 White-crowned Sparrows,two Townsend's Warblers, one Orange-crowned Warbler, one Nuttall's
Woodpecker, & two Brown Creepers.

Mallard Lake, One Belted Kingfisher, one Great Blue Heron, & one Ruby-crowned Kinglet.

Good Birding!

Lee Guichan
San Francisco

Lloyd Lake, female Green-winged Teal

Lee Guichan
 

Sorry, did not note that it was one female Green-wing Teal at Lloyd Lake, G.G.P. 

Lee Guichan
San Francisco

Tuesday night 7pm - Preventing birds from flying into glass buildings is aim of Alameda’ proposed law

Rudyard Wallen
 

Hey Folks if you're free Tuesday night the more the merrier, please pass it on to folks that might have an interest.

Hope to see you there.

Rudy W
SF


"Existing homes, historic buildings and business storefronts would be exempt from the proposed ordinance, as recommended by the city’s planning board.

Along with building standards, the council will consider regulations Tuesday aimed at reducing light pollution, including requiring most outdoor lighting be fully shielded and face downward, as well as automatic timers and other standards for upward facing lights, such as those used in landscaping, for security or as a building accent.

Alameda’s historic decorative lights in the city’s business districts would be exempt under the regulations, which were drafted with input from the Alameda Unified School District and others to meet requirements for night sports games."

The council will meet 7 p.m. Nov. 27 at City Hall, 2263 Santa Clara Ave., Alameda.


Fort Mason Orchard Oriole

David Assmann
 

An ORCHARD ORIOLE was on the east side of the Fort Mason Community Garden this morning, vocalizing after landing in a Bottlebrush. Also had an Oriole at Fort Mason on Saturday, but it was silent and I couldn’t determine whether it was a Hooded or an Orchard Oriole. The LINCOLN’S SPARROW and the WHITE-THROATED SPARROW were also in the garden this morning.

Recent sightings around SF

Oscar Moss
 

Hi All,

Some recent sightings from around SF:

Monday, Nov 19 - A HY Bald Eagle flew past myself and Lucas Corn. on Battery Godfrey, heading south toward the Sea Cliff/Outer Richmond area.

Tuesday, Nov 20 - Searched for the Lesser Black-backed Gull found by Jonah B and Dominik M around Ocean Beach, Sutro Baths, and Lake Merced. While I didn’t find it, I was able to observe 4 different Palm Warblers (1 in the concrete path at the intersection of Fulton and the Great Hwy, a second continuing in the dunes at Ocean Beach, 2 together in a cypress near the Boathouse at Lake Merced).

Thursday, Nov 22 - following up on the morning’s reports of the LBBG, I decided to give it my own shot. I arrived Ocean Beach from Ortega around 1100am. I walked north until I saw a large group of California Gulls - and in them was what appeared to be the Lesser Black-backed. Unfortunately a dog aggressively charged through the flock before I could take out my camera and get photos. But the bird flew my way and came right overhead, before the entire flock went north toward the Sutro Baths area.

Friday, Nov 23 - I joined Dominik M, Lee G, David T, Josiah C, Rob C, Adam W, Matt Z, Joachim G, Russ B, and many others in search of the adult Lesser Black-backed Gull found that morning by Brian Fitch. While nobody refound the gull, we got to see 30+ Red Phalaropes wrecked on the beach following the storm that occurred the night before.

Oscar Moss

Re: Another Orchard Oriole

Brian Fitch
 

David's post reminded me that I saw a 1st year male Orchard Oriole last Tuesday, 11/20 at Middle Lake, above the small meadow on the SW side of the lake.  Could be the same bird that Sarah Burton and I found in Sept. molted into the current plumage, or a new one.

Brian Fitch

On Mon, Nov 26, 2018 at 4:59 PM David Assmann via Groups.Io <david_assmann=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
An ORCHARD ORIOLE was on the east side of the Fort Mason Community Garden this morning, vocalizing after landing in a Bottlebrush. Also had an Oriole at Fort Mason on Saturday, but it was silent and I couldn’t determine whether it was a Hooded or an Orchard Oriole. The LINCOLN’S SPARROW and the WHITE-THROATED SPARROW were also in the garden this morning.

Ancient Murrelet, 11/24/18, etc.

Paul Saraceni
 

A few recent observations of local interest.


During Saturday (11/24) morning gull-studying and photographing by a number of of us at Ocean Beach, I observed an ANCIENT MURRELET flying N just offshore.  We also observed 7 Brant, a flock of 15 Am. Wigeon, and 1 Red Phalarope flying over the ocean, the latter 3 species initially spotted by Hugh Cotter.


This morning (11/26) during a brief session at Battery Godfrey I observed a single Greater White-fronted Goose flying solo NE (not sure whether it was the individual that has been moving around the City), and with Brian Fitch also observed hundreds of loons (including the 3 regular species) flying E high over the GG Channel and Marin Headlands, several big flocks of Am. Robins, small numbers of W. Bluebirds, Varied Thrushes, and Cedar Waxwings, and 2 Red Crossbills.


2 Humpback Whales were relatively close to shore in the Channel. 


Paul Saraceni

San Francisco

Recent miscellaneous sightings and NAB/CBC note

 

This morning (11/29/18) I attempted a mid-morning seawatch from behind the Cliff House restaurant (9:30-10a.m.) but conditions were tough with big swells and scope rattling winds so not much was seen out on the water. Most interesting was watching a massive wave slam into the back side of Seal Rock causing a mini landslide of soil on the side facing shore. I never realized how much soil had accumulated on the rock previously. There were (24) Black Turnstones and (3) Surfbirds on the rocks below the Cliff House.

Yesterday I had two separate instances of Western Bluebirds flying over mid-town hills with (5) over the Randall Museum at noon and (3) over the Reservoir below Sutro Radio Tower off Marview Street about an hour later. These are only my 3rd and 2nd times recording bluebirds from these respective locations but I suspect these will only increase as they continue expanding their range in the City. Additionally there was an after hatch year (or older) tan-stripe White-throated Sparrow with the crowned Sparrow flock on the trail right off Marview Street, right behind the "This trail not maintained for public use" sign.

On 11/22 I stopped at 39th and Ortega across the street from the public library and adjacent to the West Sunset Ballfields to look through the blackbird/starling flock gathered on the wires above the intersection and noted (43m and 2f) TRICOLORED Blackbirds so it appears the winter flock is back and once again using this site.

On 11/26 there was a single male TRIKE along with 2 possible females (reported in eBird as Tricolored/Red-winged) in the parking lot next to the Boathouse at Lake Merced. Trikes seem to get pretty scarce away from the winter flock by this time so perhaps these individuals might be settling in to winter here and should be checked for on the CBC. "The" wintering YELLOW Warbler first reported early in November by Kevin McKereghan continued in the same two Metrosideros trees next to Harding Park Drive.

While on the topic of blackbirds I thought it worthwhile to note that locally breeding Red-winged (California Bicolored) Blackbirds took a massive hit to nesting/foraging sites in just the last few months with development taking place on the former weedy lot east of Amador/Pier 94, Hunter's Point Shipyard and tule removal at North Lake in Golden Gate Park. We'll see this upcoming spring what effect this has on their population.

Also, I am beginning work on the fall report for San Francisco sightings of note for the period August - November for North American Birds. If you have any notable sightings that were not reported to this list please let me know.

Last is a reminder that it is not too early to register for the Christmas Bird Count and if you know where you will be counting to start scouting and getting early numbers on birds in your area.


Good luck out there. Questions welcome.

Dominik Mosur
San Francisco

Tanagers at Lafaytte Park in November

William Grant
 

The different tanagers have been in the park this November by Richard Bradus, Lori Lee, and myself.
along with White-throated Sparrow, Chipping Sparrow, Lincoln Sparrow, and Spotted Towhee, Merlin, Acorn Woodpeckers, etc.
The best birding seems to be near the NE corner of the tennis courts.

Summer Tanater
Nov. 26
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50246758

First seen on Nov 13
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49925696

Hooded Oriole
Nov. 30
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50324145

Western Tanager seen at Lafayette Park
Nov. 30
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50321374

Nov 24
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50185915

Nov. 6
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49721053


Bill