Date   
Least Flycatcher, Lake Merced Sep. 9

Adam Winer
 

One addition: after getting home and checking my photos (and getting a second opinion), I'm feeling more confident that I found a Least Flycatcher along "Vista Grande Canal", west of the south end of Lake Merced.  It was perched at moderate height on the opposite side of the canal from the "path", near the south end of the row of flowering eucalyptus.

Lots of Pac-slope Flycatchers in the area as well, with small numbers of the more common migrant warblers and a single Western Tanager. 

-- Adam Winer

Lawrences Goldfinch and least flycatcher

Brian Fitch
 

In the east wash 8 20 and 8  am.
Goldfinch is an immature
Brian Fitch

Black throated sparrow

Brian Fitch
 

At the vet hospital helipad
Another immature
Brian fitch

Re: Black throated sparrow

C Lou
 

The bird is still here. Check the narrow strip of grass between cars and fence of helicopter pad. Underneath cars as well. 950am.

Calvin Lou
SF



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...>
Date: 9/10/18 8:42 AM (GMT-08:00)
To: SF Birds <SFBirds@groups.io>
Subject: [SFBirds] Black throated sparrow

At the vet hospital helipad
Another immature
Brian fitch

Re: Black throated sparrow

C Lou
 

Left on the weed area by the orange wind meter pole.

Calvin Lou
SF



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: C Lou <cdlou37@...>
Date: 9/10/18 9:52 AM (GMT-08:00)
To: Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...>, SF Birds <SFBirds@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SFBirds] Black throated sparrow

The bird is still here. Check the narrow strip of grass between cars and fence of helicopter pad. Underneath cars as well. 950am.

Calvin Lou
SF



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...>
Date: 9/10/18 8:42 AM (GMT-08:00)
To: SF Birds <SFBirds@groups.io>
Subject: [SFBirds] Black throated sparrow

At the vet hospital helipad
Another immature
Brian fitch

Seawatch: Ancient Murrelet, Jaegers, 9/10/18

Paul Saraceni
 

This morning I did a seawatch (7:15-8:15 AM) from the south end of the Great Highway. Good viewing conditions with visibility out to the horizon, calm seas, and a light NW wind.


The highlight was another early (summering?) ANCIENT MURRELET and a nice, nearshore flight of jaegers.


Observations of local interest:


Surf Scoter 4

Common Loon 4

Pacific Loon 5

Peregrine Falcon 1 (flew in from offshore, took a dive at some Elegant Terns, then continued N high over the surf)

Red-necked Phalarope 4 (flying S and landed on the ocean)

Elegant Tern 1500+ (most flying S in almost constant pulses)

PARASITIC JAEGER 26 (including 3 dark morphs)

POMARINE JAEGER 3

Common Murre 60+

ANCIENT MURRELET 1 (flying N and landed on the ocean) 


Also, belated report -- on 9/8 there was a Say's Phoebe at Ft. Scott.


Paul Saraceni

San Francisco 


Re: Lawrences Goldfinch and least flycatcher and an Indigo...

Brian Fitch
 

The young Lawrence's was in fennel at the top of the East Wash, near the bench, and was hanging loosely with House Finches.  It was completely gray except for yellow edging in the flight feathers, but it was giving a lot of "tink" calls, distinguishing it easily from several nearby juv. Lesser GF's.  

The Least Flycatcher may be the same one Hugh reported a few days ago; it was also at the top of the wash in the willows.  Many Pac-slopes and several Willows were also in the area.

Calvin's already noted the place to look for the Blk-th Sparrow, but the locale is on the north side of the Veteran's Hospital at Land's End, right on the cliff between the two halves of Ft Miley.

And finally, I stopped by to see if any of the weekend action was still occurring at Elk Glen. I didn't see any continuing birds, but did find a female type Indigo Bunting in grass along the NE side of the lake.  Also interesting was a juv. Hairy Woodpecker being fed by an adult male, which seems quite late in the season.

Brian Fitch



On Mon, Sep 10, 2018 at 8:23 AM, Brian Fitch <fogeggs@...> wrote:

In the east wash 8 20 and 8  am.
Goldfinch is an immature
Brian Fitch


Re: BWHA over Godfrey - Retracted.

Jonah Benningfield
 

After reviewing photos, it looks like the “Broad-winged Hawk” over Godfrey yesterday was not, in fact, a BWHA. There were suggestions for Sharpie, Coopers, and even Red-shouldered, but in any case the BWHA report is hereby retracted.

A single Herring Gull was the only other highlight from the Battery, and Josiah and Sam’s Tennessee Warbler continued yesterday in the same tree they described. On the note of Tennessee Warblers, I should also note that Cliff Yap also had one at Middle Lake a few days ago, along with the continuing American Redstart.

best,
Jonah B.
SF

On Sep 9, 2018, at 10:28 AM, Jonah Benningfield via Groups.Io <falco1440=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hugh and I just had what looks like a Broad-winged Hawk flying north over Battery Godfrey.

best
Jonah B.
SF


Black-throated Sparrow eBird location

 

Great find, Brian.

According to Logan's research this is the 6th City Record for this species, with all coming in the past 10 years.

For anyone "eBirding" this find, please use the Hotspot "Fort Miley - West Wash."


While the West Wash proper is considered to be the trails below(north of the VA) I have been using this location for years to record birds detected from the VA property.

Good luck out there,

Dominik

Fort Mason Local Interest - Tennessee Warbler, etc

David Assmann
 

A TENNESSEE WARBLER in the Battery was one of six warbler species seen at Fort Mason this morning. An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER and a BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER were on the hillside above Aquatic Park, which also had 2 of the six YELLOW WARBLERS seen this morning (3 others were in the Battery and 1 was in the garden). WESTERN TANAGERS were everywhere - had at least 10 total (mostly in the Battery and Garden). A LAZULI BUNTING was in the garden, and a SAVANNAH SPARROW was in the Great Meadow. A RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH and at least one WESTERN KINGBIRD were in the Battery, along with 2 WESTERN FLYCATCHERS, 2 WESTERN WOOD-PEWEES and a WILLOW FLYCATCHER.  The abandoned pier had a WANDERING TATTLER and seven BLACK TURNSTONES.

Black-Throated Sparrow

David Assmann
 

Still present behind VA

Alvaro Jaramillo on Birds of Japan: First General Meeting of the Year for Sequoia Audubon, September 13, 2018

Jennifer Rycenga
 

Hey local birders!

Come to Sequoia Audubon Society’s general meeting this Thursday, September 13, to hear Sequoia's own consulting biologist and beloved birding tour professional, Alvaro Jaramillo, speak on Winter Birds of Japan. The author of the ABA’s Guide to Birds of California, Princeton University Press’s thorough study of New World Blackbirds, and the comprehensive field guide to The Birds of Chile, Alvaro is also the champion of pelagic birding in San Mateo County, playing a central role in returning off-shore birding to Half Moon Bay a decade ago. His company, Alvaro’s Adventures, now features extended international trips to South America, Africa, and Asia, as well as our local pelagic trip. A Sequoia Audubon favorite, Alvaro's talks are always informative, friendly, and entertaining.

This is our first general meeting of the 2018-2019 program season, in which Sequoia Audubon will be celebrating its SEVENTIETH ANNIVERSARY! Come out to the San Mateo Garden Center - snacks and meet-and-greet begins at 6:30, with the general meeting starting at 7:00. Free and open to all; the Garden Center is handicap accessible.

Jennifer Rycenga
San Mateo, CA
The San Mateo County Birding Guide







B&W Warbler Buena Vista Park

Richard Bradus
 

Disappointingly quiet in general this morning (Sept. 11) at Buena Vista Park but a smattering of migrants. A bit after 11am things picked up when I spotted a Black & White Warbler loosely associating with a small mixed flock of Dendroica (Townsend's and a Black-throated Gray). It was gleaning frenetically up and down the branches and tough to follow but I managed to get a couple of mediocre photos which I'll eventually upload to an eBird report. It showed a surprising amount of buffy or reddish coloration on the flanks in the photos (more than I noticed in live observation) so I assume it's an immature bird.

Also of note (hyperlocal interest) was a low flying Turkey Vulture and a couple of very vocal and active Red-shouldered Hawks. Notable also were the absence of any Steller's Jay or Robins (!) here.

Have fun out there!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco



West side

Bob Hall
 

First stop: Soccer fields/maintenance yard.
House and Bewick's wrens
Common yellow throat
Yellow warbler
FOS fox sparrow
UnID'd empid, green, no eye ring
American Fitch

Sutro Heights Park
Juv. chipping sparrow on the lawn with the bluebirds and juncos

VA helipad:
Brian's black-throated sparrow (How the heck did you come across this little patch? I didn't even know it's open to the public)

Kobbe/Upton
W. Tanagers

Community garden
Nothing unusual but pay attention to the tree by the maintence shed (holly leaf cherry?). It was teeming with birds.
Black-headed grosbeak near bramble

El Polin:
Vanishing empid

Overall, not a lot of action.
--
Bob Hall
San Francisco, CA
"There is no better high than discovery." - E.O. Wilson

East Wash - Lincoln Park Sept 11, 2018 - Dusky Flycatcher

H Cotter
 

The highlight at Lincoln Park this morning was an apparent Dusky Flycatcher seen by a number of birders and photographed. It was along the dirt path from the golf cart path to the third tee.
Other birds included up to three Fox Sparrows, two Selasphorus; Swainson's Thrush, BH Grosbeak, Say's Phoebe and misc warbler species including BT Gray.

Hugh

Black-throated still there; possible Indigo Bunting

Richard Bradus
 

Hi all

The immature Black-throated Sparrow is still showing off, as of between 10:45 and 11:15 am this morning (Sept. 12) on the VA Hospital grounds. Easiest "rare" bird ever! - as soon as I got to the east side of the helipad it popped out from under a car and foraged nearly right in front of me along the dried grassy strip bordering the parking area. Thanks Brian and all!

While scanning the trees below I got a tantalizing but very brief and distant look at what may have been a male Indigo Bunting as it flew out of a pine and down below the trees and out of sight. All I saw was the back and head. It was all deep blue above (no wing bars) with a darkish blue head and triangular, smallish beak. I kind of doubt that a male would remain in its breeding plumage this late, but I don't know what else it could have been - and, of course, it never showed itself again.

Otherwise, a fair amount of activity in the west wash (seen from above), with a couple of late immature Robins and other usuals. The only other migrant of note was a Black-headed Grosbeak.

With a cold front and clouds coming in, maybe also a new batch of migrants?

Have fun!

Richard Bradus
San Francisco

Summer Tanager in GGP

Aaron Maizlish
 

SF Birders,

A visiting birder from India, Yasmina Narechania, photographed a male Summer Tanager yesterday (Sept. 11) and posted her photo on Facebook.   According to Yasmina the male was in the Mediterranean Garden / Rhododendron Garden area of the Strybing Botanical Garden.  I’m just passing this message on in case anyone wants to look for it, it was an attractive young mostly-red male.


Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco

Mount Davidson, Sep 13 - Calliope?

Adam Winer
 

This morning, I had what I'm tentatively IDing as a probable Calliope Hummingbird south of the summit on Mount Davidson.   It was a small hummingbird, dwarfed by nearby harassing Anna's, but I had no nearby Selasphorus to compare it to (there was 1 on the mountain this morning, just not nearby).  It showed pale buffy flanks, and *no* visible rufous on a spread tail.  I thought that when perched the wings extended past the tail, but it never gave great looks to let me be confident of that.   Bill seemed on the short side.  Throat was very lightly stippled.

All-in-all, seemed pretty good for Calliope, but I never got a great look at the facial pattern, and didn't have a ton of time with the bird, which I lost track of.  One point I'm curious about is whether Rufous/Allen's every show no rufous at all at the base of the tail (I know Calliope can sometimes have some rufous).  It's certainly not a common mark.

Beyond that, there was also an immature male Rose-breasted Grosbeak - streaking continuing across the breast with just a tinge of red, an all pink bill, and a particularly contrasting head pattern.

Among more regular migrants were 2 House Wrens, 2 Black-headed Grosbeaks, a few Pacific-slope Flycatchers, 2 Townsend's, 1 Black-throated Gray, 1 Wilson's, 1 Yellow, and 3 Orange-crowned Warblers;  and several Western Tanagers.  A Sooty Fox Sparrow was my first this fall.  No vireos or other flycatchers on the mountain.

Cheers,
Adam Winer

Fort Mason Local Interest

David Assmann
 

Several waves of migrants came through Fort Mason again this morning, with expected species (although I'm still evaluating one photo of what looks like a small gray warbler). Five species of warbler, including at least 6 YELLOW WARBLERS, 2 WILSON'S WARBLERS, 2 TOWNSEND'S WARBLERS, an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER and a NASHVILLE WARBLER (mostly in the Battery). At least 8 WESTERN TANAGERS came through.  A male LAZULI BUNTING flew over just east of the garden. A WARBLING VIREO was in the Battery. Flycatchers included 2 WESTERN WOOD-PEWEES and a PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER. At least three BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAKS came through the Battery. An AMERICAN KESTREL flew over the garden, and a OSPREY flew over the Bay from the northeast. The biggest surprise was nearly stepping on a sleeping coyote sunning itself in front of the apple tree in the garden.

Strawberry Hill & BG

Loretta
 

Hi Birders!

There was a mixed flock of warblers on Strawberry Hill this morning. It was foggy and grey, so the light was terrible most of the time. But in amongst the Yellow, Wilsons, and Orange-Crowned warblers was a very elusive bird who was * not * yellow.

I got just a partial peek at his head: Full eye-ring, greyish head. 

I might have seen the same guy there a few days ago - with a similarly incomplete look. So if anyone manages to figure out who he is, please let me know!

First found the group up by the wooden bridge (path to the right when looking down). Refound them at the base of the falls later.

Good migration!

Loretta (lor-eee-ta)

P.S. The tree at the front of the Botanical Garden had Yellows, an Orange-Crowned, and two Western Tanagers. (And pygmies, Robins, and a squirrel.)