Date   
Cal Thrasher continues along Diamond Heights Boulevard

David Quady and Nancy Boas
 

Hi, Birders:

At 1:30 pm today the venerable California Thrasher was singing lustily in the strip of garden directly across the street from 5124 Diamond Heights Boulevard.

Nice to finally see this bird.

Dave Quady
Berkeley, California
davequady@...

Local Interest - Caspian Tern, Brant, Barn Swallow, Orchard Oriole

David Assmann
 

Made a loop around the foggy City this morning starting at Heron's Head Park.  My fos CASPIAN TERN flew over shortly after I got there. 23 AMERICAN WIGEON were feeding on the grass right next to the main path.  Had two LINCOLN'S SPARROWS, and a WESTERN MEADOWLARK sitting on a post, contemplating whether or not it was time to sing. At the end of the trail, I was surprised to see four BRANT, flying south. At Lake Merced, a BARN SWALLOW was in with the many TREE SWALLOWS and two VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOWS. Final stop, as the sun was starting to come through the fog, was North Lake. Got good looks at two ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS and was watching a NASHVILLE WARBLER when I heard chattering behind me.  I turned around and there was the young male ORCHARD ORIOLE https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidasf/39859545175/in/dateposted-public/


Yesterday at the west end of Alameda Island Saturday Mar 10

rosita94598
 

It is crazy that the tip of Alameda is in San Francisco, but I did not make the rules.  Yesterday, my wife and I were there with a group of high schoolers doing some habitat restoration for the coming Caspian Tern nesting season.  We were working with the US Fish & Wildlife Service biologist--this is definitely not a public access area.

But we did have a couple of Caspian Terns flying around and at one point we had a Barn Swallow, too.  During our lunch break, a Peregrine Falcon zoomed over the pond area, apparently coming from the west or northwest.  It kept right on going.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Broad-billed Hummingbird

Dan Murphy
 

Joan and I, along with about 6 others, saw the Broad-billed Hummingbird at about 12:30.  It took some time and patience, but it's still there.  Thanks to Nancy ? for spotting it.
Good birding,
Dan Murphy

MacGillivray's - Strawberry Hill

Brian Turner
 

Around 1030 an excited chipping in the brushy area on the SE corner or Strawberry Hill drew my attention. Before long up popped a beautiful male MacGillivray's Warbler, affording close views. 

Good birding, 

Brian Turner

Broad-billed Hummer still present 3-11-18

Bruce Mast
 

Foggy viewing conditions. Bird returned to feeder at 8:35 am

Bruce Mast
Oakland

Re: Broadbill continues

Jennifer Rycenga
 

The BROAD-BILLED HUMMINGBIRD continued to entertain visitors in the 3:00 pm hour today. My iNaturalist entry can be found here - https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/10173866 . We also had some very friendly and enthusiastic discussions with interested neighbors. Keep the good vibes and productive visits coming!

Jennifer Rycenga
San Mateo, CA
The San Mateo County Birding Guide







On Mar 10, 2018, at 1:35 PM, sarthur913@... [SFBirds] <SFBirds-noreply@...> wrote:

Still at feeder, 3 visits beteeen 1:05 & 1:25. 
Stefanie Arthur
San Francisco


Broad-billed Hummingbird photos

Mark Rauzon
 

The Broad-billed Hummingbird perched near to where I was standing and I was able to take close-up photos. Also an Allen's Hummer was photobombing the star of the show in this magical backyard garden near Geary.  

 http://rauzon.zenfolio.com/p859914566/hA58310FB/slideshow#ha58310c2

thanks for reporting it.

Mark Rauzon
Oakland

Broadbill continues

Stefanie Arthur
 

Still at feeder, 3 visits beteeen 1:05 & 1:25.
Stefanie Arthur
San Francisco

Re: Broad Billed Hummingbird

maliadances
 

Still being seen at 10:20am
Malia DeFelice

Black and White at Botanical Garden

Eddie Bartley
 

March 9, about 9:30 AM - SF Botanical Garden: a female BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER was feeding in crabapple trees (Rosaceae). South side of meadow, about 50 meters west of the rest rooms, the young trees are on a round mound about 15 meters in diameter surrounded by blossoming amaryllis (or maybe daffodils?). Very cooperative as if flew and fed to within six feet of me.

 

Also a female VARIED THRUSH in AIDS dell just before 9:00 AM.

 

Happy Trails!

 

Eddie Bartley

 

 

 

Caspian Tern decoys and audio

noreen_weeden
 

The Port of San Francisco and Golden Gate Audubon placed 23 Caspian Tern decoys on the platform in the Aqua Vista area (a.k.a.Pier 60 or 64) in hopes of attracting breeding terns there.   This year in addition to the decoys, 2 speakers (solar powered) were installed.  The speakers are playing Caspian Tern colony calls.  Caspian Terns had been breeding in decreasing numbers on the dilapidated pier pilings at this location. This site can be observed from Terry Francois Blvd. in the Mission Bay neighborhood.  
 
We wanted to let you know so that your bird lists are accurate.  

An effort to monitor and report on the Caspian Terns is planned.  If you are interested in participating in the monitoring please let me know.  Thank you.
 
Good birding!



Broad Billed Hummingbird

David Assmann
 

Continues at feeder

Neighborhood BROAD-BILLED HUMMINGBIRD in the Richmond 3/9/2018

Logan Kahle
 

Hi All,

About two weeks ago, Dawn Griffin first found an adult male BROAD-BILLED HUMMINGBIRD on her Geary st yard. The bird has been visiting the yard every day many times a day ever since, often appearing to come from the dense trees in the back of her yard.

The bird and the feeder is visible from the road. From this point: https://goo.gl/maps/ywyLM3YtcHH2 one can look east 3 yards to the east and see the Hummingbird feeder on the north boundary of the yard. The bird has been seen all day today, showing at least until 2pm. Dawn said she was perfectly fine with large numbers of birders looking in, and that her neighbors should be similarly accepting of this. Nonetheless, please be respectful of the residents and their privacy. The bird calls a good amount, and sounds similar to a Ruby-crowned Kinglet but slightly lighter and drier to my ear.

This represents a first San Francisco county record (#491 by my count). The vast majority of wintering Broad-bills in California leave by mid-late March, so it seems very likely to me that this bird will move out soon. As this is likely towards the end of its stay, a handy trick is that hummingbirds are diurnal migrants, so if it present one day at dusk, it will be present at least the next day at dawn.

If you use eBird to report this, please use the stakeout Broad-billed Hummingbird hotspot, which will be up shortly.

Good birding and good luck if you try,

Logan Kahle

Richmond, CA

Wandering Tattler Friday morning

rosita94598
 

Just west of the Abandoned Pier at the foot of Van Ness, the Wandering Tattler was walking along the base of the seawall at 8 AM today.  It has previously been reported many times this past winter.


Hugh B. Harvey

Walnut Creek

Lake Merced Teal

Brian Fitch
 

This morning, a female teal with dull blue in the wings flew across the Impound Lake south of the concrete bridge, and then vanished into the reeds.  She was distant, and I could see none of the finer plumage marks, but the bill looked more petite than Cinnamon.  No other teal were with her, but the drake Cinnamon was still up at the wooden bridge.  The adult male Hermit Warbler was in cypresses at the north end of the bridge's approach.

Brian Fitch

Stowe Cinnamon Teal and herons

Josiah Clark
 

Thought I should add that later I had a male Cinnamon Teal at Stowe on a second pass. The 6+ N shovelers continue there, also the only ones in the city.
There were 5 active great blue heron nests on the island, with 8 herons about. This is just one of 3 nesting locations in the city, and has long been watched over by SF Nature Education and “The Great Blue Heron Club”.
They have taught so many kids about birds it’s great! They lead field trips for families and sometimes are looking for volunteer educators and guides. Especially those with scopes as to share the wonder with the public.
As I left small male sharp-shinned hawk just missed being hit by a car as it chased a sparrow across the road. Over 80 species for the morning by the time I got home.

Black & white warbbler at Mountain Lake Park

Ken Moy
 

Succeeded on my 6th try at the black & white warbler at Mountain Lake on March 8 @ 10:15 AM.  Spotted several times foraging in the leafless trees on the eastern boundary of the dog run area (near the green wooded tool chest with chain and padlock and two green benches).  Was associating with a flock of yellow rump warbler.  Assuming it is the same as the one seen at the basketball court and tennis court areas, it ranges widely throughout the park area.


Cliff house-Ggp hr by bike highlights

Josiah Clark
 

To kick off the Spring Peak Diversity Window, Brian Turner and I put in a solid 60 minute birding effort. Starting at the Cliffhouse and ending at Stowe Lake. We totaled 68 species.

Highlights included:
Black scooter – one obvious female bird with surfScoters near seal rock. ;(I’ve scoped through hundreds all season here, this is my first).
Common yellowthroat- singing Sutro Baths, also surf bird, black turnstones...
The rare in sf- Ross’s, snow, wf geese continuing at polo fields, tree and vg swallows also near there.
Hooded mergansers, the park’s only lesser scaup, American wigeon and breeding gb herons.
Misses included black oystercatcher, most raptors, scrub jay, brown creeper and downy woodpecker to name a few.

Backyard kestrel

Josiah Clark
 

A male American kestrel was dive bombing a red tails with loud “Klee klee Klee” calls that filled the avenues when I was a kid.
They were common all through western sf, thick along Park presidio Blvd ,Ggp and even bred on residential streets.
I remember in the mid 80’s one had a nest in a vent on the side of a building on Hayes. The young would land on parked cars as they learned to fly.
With recent declines averaging 70% across the country this species is now noteworthy anywhere in the city. Just a few decades ago they probably outnumbered red tails.
Space for a kestrel box on the East side, anyone?