Date   
Clapper continues

fogeggs
 

At Heron's Head this morning, the Clapper Rail popped out of the pickleweed
at 9:25, on the berm island separating the easternmost large tide pool from
the bay.

Brian Fitch

Re: Clapper Rail continues at Heron's Head + other sightings, 07/10/10

C Lou
 

The CLAPPER RAIL was still present between 5:50pm and 6:10pm. It was between the two ponds, first found near the pond which is further south, it moved through the grasses to the largest pond (one closest to the trail), then entered the pond along the eastern edge and approached the trail once.

It flushed back to the far pond, then was seen in the channel, and
was last seen in the grasses on the east side of that channel.

Calvin D Lou
SF

----- Original Message -----
From: paulsaraceni@...
To: "SFBirds" <sfbirds@...>
Sent: Saturday, July 10, 2010 4:36:24 PM
Subject: Re: [SFBirds] Clapper Rail continues at Heron's Head + other sightings, 07/10/10

Adding to Mark's report, the CLAPPER RAIL was in view for about 20 minutes, as we scoped it from the main path. For a few minutes it was preening in the open, and at other times just its head was visible as it poked around. Another birder present, Bob, last saw it moving near the south end of the outlet channel, just below the berm.


Also present at HHP was the continuing male HARLEQUIN DUCK, which appears to be attaining cleaner alternate plumage. It was first on the water about 100 yds. SE of the end of the HHP peninsula, then it flew to its favorite roosting spot, the falling east end of the dilapidate pier N of the peninsula.


Several more species of new migrant shorebirds were also observed.


Other observations of local interest from HHP, India Basin OSP/Shoreline Park (IB), Pier 94 (P94), and Double Rock/Yosemite Slough (DY):


Surf Scoter 1 m. @ DY
Ruddy Duck 1 @ DY
Pelagic Cormorant 1 @ HHP (nr. E end of dilapidated pier)
Black Oystercatcher 8 @ DY, at least 10 @ IB/HHP, 3 @ P94
Am. Avocet 1 @ DY, 10 @ IB/HHP (no chicks observed today)
BLACK-NECKED STILT 6 (incl. 4 chicks) @ HHP (also 1 of the adults at IB)
Semipalmated Plover 1 @ HHP
Bl.-bel. Plover 1 @ HHP (basic plumage)
Long-billed Curlew 1 @ DY, 3 @ IB/HHP, 1 @ P94
Whimbrel 5 @ DY, 3 @ IB/HHP
Willet 40+ @ IB/HHP, 1 @ P94
Marbled Godwit 3 @ IB/HHP
Western Sandpiper 4 ad. @ HHP
Least Sandpiper 8 @ DY, 6 @ HHP, 3 @ P94
Spotted Sandpiper 1 ad. @ P94
PHALAROPE SP. (likely Red-necked) 1@ DY (flying then briefly touched down on slough and flew on)
Hooded Oriole 2 imm. @ IB Shoreline Park


Paul Saraceni
San Francisco



----- Original Message -----
From: "Mark Eaton" <marksffo@...>
To: sfbirds@...
Cc: "Mark Eaton" <marksffo@...>
Sent: Saturday, July 10, 2010 12:56:01 PM
Subject: [SFBirds] Clapper Rail continues at Heron's Head






This morning around 9:30, Paul Saraceni, Hugh Cotter and I had the radio-tagged CLAPPER RAIL at Heron's Head. It was working the southernmost berm just west of the outlet from the easternmost large pond.

More to follow,
Mark
---
Mark Eaton
mark@...

Re: Clapper Rail continues at Heron's Head + other sightings, 07/10/10

Paul Saraceni
 

Adding to Mark's report, the CLAPPER RAIL was in view for about 20 minutes, as we scoped it from the main path. For a few minutes it was preening in the open, and at other times just its head was visible as it poked around. Another birder present, Bob, last saw it moving near the south end of the outlet channel, just below the berm.


Also present at HHP was the continuing male HARLEQUIN DUCK, which appears to be attaining cleaner alternate plumage. It was first on the water about 100 yds. SE of the end of the HHP peninsula, then it flew to its favorite roosting spot, the falling east end of the dilapidate pier N of the peninsula.


Several more species of new migrant shorebirds were also observed.


Other observations of local interest from HHP, India Basin OSP/Shoreline Park (IB), Pier 94 (P94), and Double Rock/Yosemite Slough (DY):


Surf Scoter 1 m. @ DY
Ruddy Duck 1 @ DY
Pelagic Cormorant 1 @ HHP (nr. E end of dilapidated pier)
Black Oystercatcher 8 @ DY, at least 10 @ IB/HHP, 3 @ P94
Am. Avocet 1 @ DY, 10 @ IB/HHP (no chicks observed today)
BLACK-NECKED STILT 6 (incl. 4 chicks) @ HHP (also 1 of the adults at IB)
Semipalmated Plover 1 @ HHP
Bl.-bel. Plover 1 @ HHP (basic plumage)
Long-billed Curlew 1 @ DY, 3 @ IB/HHP, 1 @ P94
Whimbrel 5 @ DY, 3 @ IB/HHP
Willet 40+ @ IB/HHP, 1 @ P94
Marbled Godwit 3 @ IB/HHP
Western Sandpiper 4 ad. @ HHP
Least Sandpiper 8 @ DY, 6 @ HHP, 3 @ P94
Spotted Sandpiper 1 ad. @ P94
PHALAROPE SP. (likely Red-necked) 1@ DY (flying then briefly touched down on slough and flew on)
Hooded Oriole 2 imm. @ IB Shoreline Park


Paul Saraceni
San Francisco

----- Original Message -----
From: "Mark Eaton" <marksffo@...>
To: sfbirds@...
Cc: "Mark Eaton" <marksffo@...>
Sent: Saturday, July 10, 2010 12:56:01 PM
Subject: [SFBirds] Clapper Rail continues at Heron's Head






This morning around 9:30, Paul Saraceni, Hugh Cotter and I had the radio-tagged CLAPPER RAIL at Heron's Head. It was working the southernmost berm just west of the outlet from the easternmost large pond.

More to follow,
Mark
---
Mark Eaton
mark@...

Clapper Rail continues at Heron's Head

Mark Eaton
 

This morning around 9:30, Paul Saraceni, Hugh Cotter and I had the radio-tagged CLAPPER RAIL at Heron's Head. It was working the southernmost berm just west of the outlet from the easternmost large pond.

More to follow,
Mark
---
Mark Eaton
mark@...

Re: Can the experts help?

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Hi there



First of all, it's a good custom to write your name..at this point I have
no idea who I am communicating with and even though the internet is
impersonal, I would rather know I am talking to a real person!



The White-crowned Sparrows can be separated; there is a pretty good account
in the NGS guide. But in summer, the only one we have around here in the Bay
Area (usually within the fog line, the moister and cooler areas of the Bay)
is the Nuttall's. In September the Gambel's and Puget Sound birds come down,
then it becomes tougher. Nuttall's and Puget Sound are often inseparable in
the field; Gambel's is more straight forward if you look carefully.



North Americans tend to follow the AOU list, and they have not voted on the
Yellow-rumped Warbler now that new information has come out on them. Of the
four possible species, two are found south of the border and are resident.
The Audubon's - Myrtle pair is treated in the major field guides, or for
more detail Dunn and Garrett's Warbler Guide (part of the Peterson Series)
is good. The separation of these two birds can be tough in winter,
particularly young birds. The general bits to look for are 1) yellow on
throat = Audubon's 2) Big white wing patch = Audubon's 3) Dark mask, and
obvious pale supercilium = Myrtle 4) Face and throat colors blend rather
than change more drastically = Audubon's 5) more white in tail = Audubon's
etc.



Cheers,



Al



Alvaro Jaramillo

chucao@...

Half Moon Bay, California



Field Guides - Birding Tours Worldwide

www.fieldguides.com

_____

From: SFBirds@... [mailto:SFBirds@...] On Behalf Of
fk94131
Sent: Friday, July 09, 2010 5:52 PM
To: SFBirds@...
Subject: [SFBirds] Can the experts help?





I have two questions for any of the experts who can help:

1. How can you identify the subspecies of a white-crowned sparrow? A pair
visited my yard. One had an extended bath in the birdbath; the other foraged
enthusiastically amid the Mexican daisies. Is there any way of telling
whether they're Nutall's or one of the others?

2. On the yellow-rumped warblers: I find IOC has split them into 4 species,
but AOU hasn't. How do most birders on this list treat them? (And how do you
distinguish an Audubon's and a Myrtle?)

Many thanks to anyone who responds.

7/9/10 - Mt. D./HHP

Dominik Mosur
 

No new arrivals on Mt. Davidson this morning. A BAND-TAILED PIGEON (possible resident breeder) could be seen through the thick fog on one of the euke snags above the north side ravine. Another resident, HUTTON'S VIREO was vocalizing in the big red elderberry above the south side entrance intersection. The female HOODED ORIOLE that I found working the scrub above the houses on the south side Wednesday was in the elderberries at the top of the ravine today.

There is a good crop of blooming Tarweed (Madia sp.) throughout the southeast grassland area this year. Lesser Goldfinches were already checking out some of the maturing seed pods this morning. This will be a spot worth checking for other interesting seed-eaters as the summer progresses.

Around mid-day I drove through Golden Gate Park on a work related errand and noticed that a backhoe was clearing out vegetation on the north side of Elk Glen Lake leaving in its wake wide swaths of open mud. Freshwater marsh/mud habitat of this type is virtually non-existent in the City so this could be a good spot to check for interesting sandpiper/shorebird arrivals as migration for these species picks up in the coming weeks.

After work I stopped by Heron's Head. (2) WHIMBRELS were new arrivals. The BLACK-NECKED STILTS were loudly tending to their brood of (3) remaining chicks, at times mantling over them in response to humans and dogs passing too closely on the trail.

Other shorebirds included (15) WILLETS, the summering basic plumage BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, LONG-BILLED CURLEW, (7) LEAST SANDPIPERS, (2) WESTERN SANDPIPERS, American Avocets (8a, only 1 juv), (2) Killdeer and (9) BLACK OYSTERCATCHERS (the locally nesting pair w/ juv plus 6 others seen flying in from the direction of India Basin.)

A PELAGIC CORMORANT was on the pier and a male GREATER SCAUP was on India Basin.

Good birding,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco

Can the experts help?

R K Bose
 

I have two questions for any of the experts who can help:

1. How can you identify the subspecies of a white-crowned sparrow? A pair visited my yard. One had an extended bath in the birdbath; the other foraged enthusiastically amid the Mexican daisies. Is there any way of telling whether they're Nutall's or one of the others?

2. On the yellow-rumped warblers: I find IOC has split them into 4 species, but AOU hasn't. How do most birders on this list treat them? (And how do you distinguish an Audubon's and a Myrtle?)

Many thanks to anyone who responds.

Mt. D. 7/8/10: Olive-sided Flycatcher et al

Dominik Mosur
 

Birding Mt. Davidson on my lunch break I found the summering OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER I had failed to locate yesterday.

The bird was heard singing several times and I also watched it chase an American Robin that had perched to close to "its" snag. However, it was also seen eating insects it had hawked so its clearly not provisioning a nest and appears to have failed to attract a mate this summer.

Is anyone seeing/hearing Olive-sided Flycatcher in the Presidio this summer?

Other birds of local interest included the hatch-year ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER that was around yesterday. An adult male VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW had joined the pair of TREE SWALLOWS in foraging over the open area at the top of the hill.

In the weedy hillside near the "fence" I found a lone PINE SISKIN foraging alongside (40+, including a number of recently fledged) LESSER GOLDFINCHES and smaller numbers of House Finches and House Sparrows.

I also saw a total of five (5) NUTTALL'S WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS missing all their tail feathers. This is the result of ignorant-idiot cat owners allowing their pets to roam the hill and hunt wildlife. Despite what some apologists for this hideous behavior may tell you, White-crowns DO NOT molt all their tail feathers simultaneously.

Good birding,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco

hooded vs bullocks

Edward Donnan
 

I just spent time comparing images of bullocks and hooded orioles. I am going to retract the bullocks in favor of the hooded.thanks for the info on habitat preference.

Re: Please help me identify this bird

GildaT <gtabarez@...>
 

Many thanks to all who responded in private. So far, four out of four birders think it is a California Towhee. The bird has a reddish throat with front feathers that are faintly streaked, darker wings and back. The bird's call is similar to the one recorded on Whatbird.com. This site also states that the California Towhees are highly territorial and will often battle their own reflections in windows or other reflective surfaces. This brave little bird's need to engage its perceived opponent overcame its fear of my peeking at it through the mailslot. Even two predatory cats did not keep it away for long, which is why I had to paper over the brass footplate.

Regards,
Gilda

--- In SFBirds@..., "GildaT" <gtabarez@...> wrote:

Hello:

I am new to birding and to this list. I need help in identifying a cute bird who has been knocking on my front door rather often these past few days. I have uploaded video footage here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwVGCVzVnto

Gilda Tabarez
Bernal Heights
San Francisco

Mt D. 7/7/10 : YRWarbler et al

Dominik Mosur
 

With the winds dying down a bit and the fog clearing I made the trek up Mt. Davidson from the La Bica Street entrance today.

The most unexpected was a dull female YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER foraging high up in the trees near the trailhead. Despite the poor lighting I was able to ID it as an Audubon's based on the chip note.
I've seen and heard others report YRWA in the Bay Area away from breeding areas in July before but this seems quite a bit on the early side.

Other dispersants of note included a dull hatch-year ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER (confirmed breeding in SF this year @ Rotary Meadow on Mt. Sutro by Josiah Clark), a hatch-year male BULLOCK'S ORiOLE, a female HOODED ORIOLE and a pair of TREE SWALLOWS.

There was a couple of singing WILSON'S WARBLERS heard but I was disappointed to not detect an Olive-sided Flycatcher. I had a singing OSFL up there just last Friday. OSFL has suffered one of the most dramatic declines of our Neotropical migrants in the last several decades.

Finally, just wanted to put it out there that around 12:30 p.m. I heard several verses of a song that sounded akin to Catharus sp. thrush somewhere below the cross. I never got close to the bird and it stopped vocalizing after a few minutes as the wind picked back up. I waited over 45 minutes to hear it again to no avail.

The song lacked the pulsing cadence of Swainson's or Hermit but was rather more a continous, rising warble. I listened to Catharus thrush songs immediately after getting back to the car but nothing on Peterson Western edition seemed to match. Who knows, could be worth checking out?
Maybe someone can track it down but I can't make it back up there until tomorrow a.m. at the earliest.

Good birding,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco

western bluebird

Edward Donnan
 

i was in the presidio this morning doing a little birthday birding. in the cemetery, i spotted what i believe was a female or possibly immature male western bluebird. a lifer for me. also a stunning male bullocks oriole. good birding to all. eddie donnan

7/7/10 miscellanea and July 4th Arb. walk

Dominik Mosur
 

Decided to check out my new local patch, Pine Lake Park, having recently moved nearby.

The most unusual bird was a PINE SISKIN feeding in the weedy hillside east of the lake in the company of several AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES.

MALLARDS, RED-SHOULDERED HAWKS, ALLEN's/ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRDS, BARN/VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOWS, BLACK PHOEBES, AMERICAN ROBINS, CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEES, BROWN CREEPERS, PYGMY NUTHATCHES, SONG SPARROWS, DARK-EYED JUNCOS and HOUSE FINCHES are all enjoying success in the breeding season here with juveniles of all these species detected.

On the drive to work I watched a female COOPER'S HAWK going after Rock Pigeons as I waited on the light at Laguna Honda and Clarendon.

On 4th of July, Ginny Marshall and I led 40+ people in two groups on the 1st Sunday of the month Arboretum walk. The highlights among the 39 species observed were:

CALIFORNIA QUAIL (including at least 4 chicks < week old, a sliver of hope remains)
RED-TAILED HAWKS (4 juveniles "kettling" at once, also 2 adults)
RED-SHOULDERED HAWK (juv, flying with j. Red-tail for nice comparative study of the two species)
CASPIAN TERN (fly-over, "commuting" west)
HUTTON'S VIREO (scope looks at one basking in the sun)
WINTER WREN (juv. with orange gape approaching the group within 15 feet)
WILSON'S WARBLER (a likely post-breeding dispersant from nearby, we did not note this species on territroy in the Arb. in the previous two months on the walk)
HOODED ORIOLE (heard only, another likely dispersant, Hooded Orioles were not noted breeding in the Arboretum this spring)

The next regularly scheduled Golden Gate Audubon walk is Friday, July 16th on Corona Heights. We meet in front of the Randall Museum at 8 a.m. For directions go to : randallmuseum.org
Come out, enjoy the birds, wildflowers etc. and if you haven't done so already, join Golden Gate Audubon and help support Bay Area conservation.

For local conservation posts check out the GGAS yahoo group at:

ggasconservation@...

Dominik Mosur
San Francisco

Re: Anyone seen Elegant Tern this year yet ?

Dan Murphy
 

Hugh,
Just to let you know I haven't seen any Elegant Terns yet.  The reason I'm responding to the group is because I did have 3 Sanderlings on Ocean Beach at Fort Funston on 7/2.  The were with the 7 Whimbrels Alan reported.

Dan Murphy

--- On Tue, 7/6/10, htcotter@... <htcotter@...> wrote:

From: htcotter@... <htcotter@...>
Subject: [SFBirds] Anyone seen Elegant Tern this year yet ?
To: "sfbirds" <sfbirds@...>
Date: Tuesday, July 6, 2010, 6:44 PM







 









Just wondering if anyone has seen Elegant Terns yet this year in SF ?

They are usually in by now or sooner.



Thanks



Hugh





























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

HHP: 7/6/10 p.m.

Dominik Mosur
 

Spent a couple of hours scouring the marsh with my scope looking for Richard D.'s Clapper rail, without luck. I had the same negative result yesterday w/lower tide (2-4p.m)

When I left Calvin L. was still around, maybe he'll have better news.

The only thing to add to the bird's reported from there yesterday by Paul S. were a 1st summer Glaucous-winged Gull and the juvie Black Oystercatcher seen for the first time (by me at least) in flight and in the marsh.

Earlier today I birded the Buena Vista Park restoration area at lunch. A juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird was seen associating with an adult male and female Hooded Oriole.

Good birding,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco

Re: Anyone seen Elegant Tern this year yet ?

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Hugh



None in Half Moon Bay yet and I have been keeping eyes and ears open all
week. First juvenile California Gull today though.



Alvaro



Alvaro Jaramillo

chucao@...

Half Moon Bay, California



Field Guides - Birding Tours Worldwide

www.fieldguides.com

_____

From: SFBirds@... [mailto:SFBirds@...] On Behalf Of
htcotter@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 06, 2010 6:45 PM
To: sfbirds
Subject: [SFBirds] Anyone seen Elegant Tern this year yet ?





Just wondering if anyone has seen Elegant Terns yet this year in SF ?
They are usually in by now or sooner.

Thanks

Hugh

Re: Anyone seen Elegant Tern this year yet ?

tomcrown69
 

I saw one at Chrisse field on Saturday.

On Jul 6, 2010, at 6:44 PM, htcotter@... wrote:

Just wondering if anyone has seen Elegant Terns yet this year in SF ?
They are usually in by now or sooner.

Thanks

Hugh

Anyone seen Elegant Tern this year yet ?

h cotter
 

Just wondering if anyone has seen Elegant Terns yet this year in SF ?
They are usually in by now or sooner.


Thanks


Hugh

Re: Clapper Rail at Heron's Head Park

Kevin McKereghan
 

Great bird! After seeing them at Oyster Point and Sierra Point, I
figured they were moving up the penninsula, glad to see a bird made it.

From the iPhone
Kevin McKereghan
415-235-6186

On Jul 6, 2010, at 14:26, Richard Drechsler <r_drechsler@...>
wrote:

Dear Birders,

On the evening on July 3rd I spotted a Clapper Rail in Heron's
Head Park. The bird was located 80 - 100 yards from the
concrete viewing counters and in the grass just east
of the channel that winds towards the spit. It was at the
southern most part of that section of marsh. (You will need
a scope)

I believe that Clapper Rails have not been seen in HH or other
parts of SF for many years. Fortunately I was able to take a photo
of the Rail that can be found at the following address.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/14741077@N07/4769230092/in/set-72157624437817240/

Notice the horizontal projection that appears to come from its far
scapular.
I checked and it seems that one government agency is placing
tracking transmitters
on Clapper Rails. I'm waiting for more information. If I learn that
this bird was
tagged and did arrive at HH voluntarily, I'll let you know.

regards,

richd
====

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Clapper Rail at Heron's Head Park

Richard Drechsler
 

Dear Birders,

On the evening on July 3rd I spotted a Clapper Rail in Heron's
Head Park. The bird was located 80 - 100 yards from the
concrete viewing counters and in the grass just east
of the channel that winds towards the spit. It was at the
southern most part of that section of marsh. (You will need
a scope)

I believe that Clapper Rails have not been seen in HH or other
parts of SF for many years. Fortunately I was able to take a photo
of the Rail that can be found at the following address.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/14741077@N07/4769230092/in/set-72157624437817240/

Notice the horizontal projection that appears to come from its far scapular.
I checked and it seems that one government agency is placing tracking transmitters
on Clapper Rails. I'm waiting for more information. If I learn that this bird was
tagged and did arrive at HH voluntarily, I'll let you know.

regards,

richd
====

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]