Date   

cool critters : 7/3/10

Dominik Mosur
 

Got out to do a seawatch from the back of the Cliffhouse this morning. It was hazy and visibility poor. (10) SURF SCOTERS southwest of Seal Rocks are summering over in the area.

COMMON MURRES continue to move around, dozens seen in 20 minutes under less than ideal conditions.

A BLACK OYSTERCATCHER is incubating on the southmost rock. With patience you can see it stand up and turn the egg every so often. A scope is great for this but binoculars will suffice.

(20+) WESTERN GULL chicks, with their fuzzy bodies and cute spotted heads, are scattered in 8-10 broods on the large south rock. A parent gull flew in and regurgitated a tasty, wet, meal for its two charges as I watched.

Later walked about 50 yards up the trail on Mt. Davidson, using the La Bica entrance. OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER, WILSON'S WARBLER and AMERICAN ROBIN were singing throughout.

A male WESTERN TANAGER in the first blooming euke was not really surprising (had them up here well into July last year as well.) It was aggressive, chasing a HOUSE FINCH trying to feed on the nectar, and gave a single anbrupt verse of song at one point.

The fuschia was attracting several ALLEN'S HUMMINGBIRDS including at least two adult males. Migrant Rufous hummingbirds are starting to be reported from inland locations already so things are going to get confusing again soon in regard to Selasphorus.

A sharp looking HUTTON'S VIREO looked like a hatch year bird produced on Mt. Davidson.

On the way over Twin Peaks I saw a Brush Rabbit duck into the vegetation on the side of the road. It's my first Brush Rabbit sighting at this location in almost a decade. Good to know they are still around, too bad the quail didn't make it.

An adult male COOPER'S HAWK was preening in a cypress at the entrance to the Randall Museum when I arrived to work:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33576979@N02/4757342095/


Good birding,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco


7/1-7/2/10 misc. stuff

Dominik Mosur
 

Yesterday afternoon (7/1/10) at the east end of Lobos Dunes the WRENTITS were especially vocal. A(the?) male sang unprompted dozens of times between 6:15-7:15 p.m. from the scrub/willow riparian interface, while another gave the "tiny ratchet" scold calls.

(3) Hatch-year RED-TAILED HAWKS were flying around and interacting over the site including fighting over a Meadow vole which indicates that they have quickly learning to be be self-sufficient hunters.

A BEWICK'S WREN was giving scold calls from a dense stand of Silver Lupine near the observation deck bench along the boardwalk.

This morning (7/2) at the Log Cabin trail below Stow Lake I observed a fly-over adult male COOPER'S HAWK. Cooper's Hawks were once unheard of in the summer in San Francisco but have been confirmed breeding in several spots throughout the city the past several years in keeping with the trend of expanding into urban/suburban zones throughout the Bay Area.

Still quite a few Allen's Hummingbirds around Golden Gate Park as well although I didn't see any adult males which have started their southward migration. A WILSON'S WARBLER could be heard singing over the traffic noise from behind McLaren lodge as I drove by on JFK Drive.

At Corona Heights this afternoon a hatch-year BLACK PHOEBE was the first post breeding dispersant of this species to show up on the hill. I watched the young phoebe attempt to catch a large orange butterfly and miss. The butterfly didn't look right for a Monarch and besides its still too early for those to be flying trough so I waited till it set down and got my bins on a lifer butterfly, GULF FRITILLARY.

Good birding,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco


Re: Herons Head Park and 4th of July Holiday

Noreen Weeden
 

This is a follow up to the posting about temporary fencing at Herons Head Park:

Please be advised that the Port of San Francisco will be closing Heron's Head
Park from 4:00 PM on the 4th of July to 8:00 AM on the 5th of July. The Port
will install temporary fencing and a security guard may be present.

The closure is taking place for security and safety reasons, as Heron's Head
Park has traditionally suffered some abuse from celebrants on and the 4th of
July, which impacts wildlife and obviously poses a significant risk of fire in
the park.

A sign will be installed notifying park users of this.

Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns about this
proposed closure. Thanks, Ruben

Rubén Solís, Jr.
Property Manager
Southern Waterfront
Port of San Francisco
Pier 1
San Francisco, CA 94111
Direct: 415.274.0523
Bus. Cell: 415.725.1447
Main: 415.274.0400
e-Fax: 415.544.1711
email: ruben.solis@ sfport.com

David Beaupre
Planning and Development
Port of San Francisco
Pier 1
San Francisco CA 94111
415-274-0539
Fax- 415-732-0409

 Noreen Weeden
415-252-1039




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Coastside/Bayside/Corona Heights/Middle Lake 7/1/10

Dominik Mosur
 

Started the morning with a brief sea-watch from the Sutro Baths overlook (6:25-6:55a.m.)

COMMON MURRES in alternate plumage were moving around in good numbers, mostly southbound from just beyond Seal Rocks to about 3/4 of the way out to the horizon. I tallied (226), largest group flying by (29), none appeared to set on the water within view.
The first  (12, adults) HEERMANN'S GULLS I've seen so far this year in San Francisco were roosting on Seal Rock with (34) BROWN PELICANS. (24) CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS were hauled out on Seal Rock.

Other stuff of local interest:
BRANDT'S CORMORANTS (400+ continue on top of Mile Rock Lighthouse)
PIGEON GUILLEMOTS (8, foraging close to shore)
BLACK OYSTERCATCHER (Seal Rock)
CASPIAN TERNS (3, foraging close to shore)
The MALLARD hen on Sutro Baths freshwater pond has reared (4) young to near adult size.
On Ocean Beach across from the Beach Chalet there were an additional (15, adult) Heermann's Gulls roosting with WESTERN GULLS.

At O.B. near the seawall (across from Noriega) there was a lone, worn breeding plumage, WILLET, the first shorebird migrant of the season in SF I have observed. The Snowy Plover habitat here has been leveled (sand removal?) and no plovers were seen.

It was interesting to observe a heated interaction between two dog owners on the beach. A man with a small, spaniel-like, dog (on-leash) had harsh words for the owner of a pit-bull mix (off-leash) after the latter's dog charged him. The owner of the off-leash dog walked of cursing and muttering something about "crushing skulls." Local birder and Arboretum volunteer Rob Cullison stepped in briefly, attempting to educate the off-leash dog owner about GGNRA policy regarding Snowy Plover protection, but was ignored.

My next stop was Bayview Hill (7:45-8:40 a.m.)

I searched for buntings at the spot where I had observed a female Lazuli with a fledged, begging, youngster on Sunday (6/27) I found no buntings. There were (6) LESSER GOLDFINCHES feeding on Italian Thistle seed at the spot, same as had been on my previous visit.

I did some research on Lazuli buntings (North American Birds Online, Cornell Database) dispersal/movement of adults with fledged young but couldn't find anything substantial. I suppose its possible that a female bunting could have flown in from another area with a fledgling in tow (San Bruno Mountain, McClaren Park) but considering how little of the weedy/grassland habitat I have taken the time to closely survey up there its just as likely that a single breeding pair could have been overlooked.

A pair of WHITE-THROATED SWIFTS were foraging/vocalizing over the hill.

It was a good morning for SPOTTED TOWHEES. I counted a total of (11) including two brownish juveniles accompanied by adults. BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS first appeared/started vocalizing on Bayview Hill in the last week of May. Today I saw (2) male-female pairs. I once again failed to locate a single Wrentit. Even the mockingbirds have dropped their "ping-pong ball" vocalizations from their repeirtoire.

On the way into work I stopped at India Basin Open Space and scoped the mudflats looking for migrant shorebirds. The only species present were a pair of locally nesting AMERICAN AVOCETS along with (3) SNOWY EGRETS and a CASPIAN TERN roosting at Heron's Head Park. The main entrance to Heron's Head Park was being fenced off as I drove by. I hope this is only a temporary closure, perhaps related to the continuing construction on the enviromental education center.

Made a quick stop at Pier 94 where I had (2) pairs of AMERICAN AVOCETS, one pair displaying loudly and vigorously at a fisherman on the rip-rap (no chicks observed), a LONG-BILLED CURLEW and (2) KILLDEER.

Stuff of local interest observed throughout the day at Corona Heights:

GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL (worn 1st summer bird flying over around noon, likely the same bird seen 6/29, probably over-summering nearby, Safeway at Market and Church?)
COOPER'S HAWK (either hatch year or after hatch year bird flying over the park around 9:30 a.m., first Coop I've seen here since spring migration ended in mid-May)
TURKEY VULTURE (fly-over)

At lunch I took a walk around Middle Lake in Golden Gate Park. Most noteworthy were (6) WILSON'S WARBLER, 4 singing birds at various spots plus a hatch year bird still retaining some gray down on its flanks in close association with an adult.

Good birding,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco


Lobos dunes 6/30/10

Dominik Mosur
 

Spent the late afternoon at Lobos Dunes with my son Lucas. Most of our activities involved climbing fallen trees and throwing pine cones (he's almost 3) but I managed to note a few species of local interest as well including:
Hairy Woodpecker (4, at least two of them hatch year birds with red forecrowns)
Bewick's Wren (singing from the edge of the cypress woods)
Bushtits(40+ in four groups largest 21)

An adult female Cooper's Hawk was seen chasing a Mourning Dove over the tops of the cypresses.

A Eurasian Collared Dove ducked out of sight in the dense crown of a Monterey pine at the south edge of the parking lot. I'm not sure if anyone has ever found an EC Dove nest in SF but this would be a good spot too look for you glory seekers out there.

Good birding,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco


6/29-6/30/10 misc.

Dominik Mosur
 

On Tuesday (6/29) walking around on Corona Hill around 11 a.m. I observed fly-over TURKEY VULTURE and surprisingly a very ragged looking 1st summer GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL.

The Farewell-to-Spring are still holding strong with this year's higher than normal rainfall but it won't be long before they fade:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33576979@N02/4749806977/

Today (6/30) I walked around the newly restored area of Buena Vista Park, only a couple blocks from Corona Heights. The restored, open areas, were host to a mix of expected species including some exhibiting rarely seen behavior:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33576979@N02/4749808347/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/33576979@N02/4750454420/

A nice find was this confiding individual:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33576979@N02/4750457344/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33576979@N02/4750452812/

A female HOODED ORIOLE was foraging in the live oaks above the restoration area. First of its kind I've seen in the park, once again a likely beneficiary of the opening up of this area and the native plants used in the restoration.

Good birding,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco


Re: 6/27/10 : breeding notes etc. in the SE

Paul Saraceni
 

I also made a visit to Candlestick and India Basin/Heron's Head Park this morning ~8-9 AM (didn't run into Dom) and observed 3 Savannah Sparrows -- 2 together -- ranging from the last pond to the east end of the HHP peninsula. Observed flying about the grasses and shrubs, giving light call note, but I didn't hear them sing. This is the precise area where this species can be found in winter so reasonable possibility that these are post-nesting dispersers, back to a traditional non-nesting location. I haven't observed any nesting behavior here before, but worth keeping an eye out.


My species list was similar to Dom's. All I can add was a male Surf Scoter off of India Basin Open Space, another Long-billed Curlew on the low tide flats at Candlestick Cove, 2 alt. plumage Willets @ HHP (likely return migrants), and a 1st-summer Ring-billed Gull on the flats SW of HHP. Nesting-wise, there were 7 (in 2 groups of 3 & 4) tiny Avocet chicks being guarded by noisy parents at HHP, and a Killdeer on a nest scrape at Pier 94. Unfortunately, there are way too many young Canada Geese in India Basin.


A brief stop at the S end of the Great Highway produced 9 Surf Scoters on the ocean, 3 Heermann's Gulls, 1 Pigeon Guillemot, and 15+ Bank Swallows flying up and down the beach.


Paul Saraceni
San Francisco

----- Original Message -----
From: "Alan Hopkins" <alanhopkins@...>
To: "SFBirds" <sfbirds@...>, "Atria Rondone" <cemni85@...>, "Dominik Mosur" <polskatata@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 27, 2010 6:09:42 PM
Subject: Re: [SFBirds] 6/27/10 : breeding notes etc. in the SE






Dom,

Savannah Sparrows have never bred in SF as far as I am aware. During breeding bird atlas surveys I only had them until April 5 after which I did not get another sighting. They seem to be absent most of the summer, it's hard to know what to make of your sightings, it would be great to find some other evidence to confirm breeding.


Alan Hopkins
--- On Sun, 6/27/10, Dominik Mosur < polskatata@... > wrote:

From: Dominik Mosur < polskatata@... >
Subject: [SFBirds] 6/27/10 : breeding notes etc. in the SE
To: "SFBirds" < sfbirds@... >, "Atria Rondone" < cemni85@... >
Date: Sunday, June 27, 2010, 7:31 PM



Did a tour of the Southeast side of the city this morning (7:10 - 10:30 a.m.) starting at Bayview Hill - Candlestick SRA - Yosemite Slough/Double Rock - Heron's Head/India Basin finishing with 54 total species (a pretty good total for the area covered considering the time of year.)

Most interesting was the presence of a female LAZULI BUNTING with a begging juvenile in tow on the steep grassy hillside on the Southwest side of Bayview Hill. I hadn't noted this species here since mid-May although Adam Winer did have a female on the hill 6/13/10/, but it appears that they pulled of a successful breeding attempt.

Other stuff of local interest:

GREATER SCAUP (m,f in the Bay off Double Rock)
SURF SCOTER (2m, 2f " )
RUDDY DUCK (alt m, " )
BUFFLEHEAD (continuing at HHP)
COMMON LOON (basic, off Candlestick point, continuing summering bird) )
PELAGIC CORMORANT (2 at end of Heron's Head pier)
BLACK OYSTERCATCHERS (6 flying together high over Candlestick Rec area then Yosemite Slough then out over bay, a 7th was on Double Rock, another pair was at HHP along with the now nearly full grown chick)
BLACK-NECKED STILT (incubating, HHP)
MARBLED GODWIT (HHP, very worn, likely summering locally)
LONG-BILLED CURLEW (2, HHP)
WHITE-THROATED SWIFT (2 over Bayview Hill, never confirmed but suspected of breeding in the area)

SAVANNAH SPARROW (2, HHP a good distance apart could represent two separate territories and possibly breeding here, one was singing repeatedly. I also heard a probable 3rd Savannah Sparrow giving chips from some bunchgrasses in the Candlestick Parking lot that is due to be developed for condos in the future)

There was a Common Buckeye butterfly in the Candlestick lot as well.

There has been much talk in recent months on SFBirds about Nuttall's White-crowned Sparrow (our endemic breeding sub-species) and efforts to restore their breeding habitat in Golden Gate Park and other parts of the city. However Bryant's Savannah Sparrow (a California species of special concern) has been entirely ignored it seems. In contrast to the White-crown of which there are dozens if not hundreds of breeding pairs left in the city, the Savannah Sparrow is down to a handful of breeding pairs at most and its habitat is imperiled by proposed "re-development" of the baylands in southeast San Francisco.

Good birding,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: 6/27/10 : breeding notes etc. in the SE

Alan Hopkins
 

Dom,
 
Savannah Sparrows have never bred in SF as far as I am aware. During breeding bird atlas surveys I only had them until April 5 after which I did not get another sighting. They seem to be absent most of the summer, it's hard to know what to make of your sightings, it would be great to find some other evidence to confirm breeding.

 
Alan Hopkins

--- On Sun, 6/27/10, Dominik Mosur <polskatata@...> wrote:


From: Dominik Mosur <polskatata@...>
Subject: [SFBirds] 6/27/10 : breeding notes etc. in the SE
To: "SFBirds" <sfbirds@...>, "Atria Rondone" <cemni85@...>
Date: Sunday, June 27, 2010, 7:31 PM


 



Did a tour of the Southeast side of the city this morning (7:10 - 10:30 a.m.) starting at Bayview Hill - Candlestick SRA - Yosemite Slough/Double Rock - Heron's Head/India Basin finishing with 54 total species (a pretty good total for the area covered considering the time of year.)

Most interesting was the presence of a female LAZULI BUNTING with a begging juvenile in tow on the steep grassy hillside on the Southwest side of Bayview Hill. I hadn't noted this species here since mid-May although Adam Winer did have a female on the hill 6/13/10/, but it appears that they pulled of a successful breeding attempt.

Other stuff of local interest:

GREATER SCAUP (m,f in the Bay off Double Rock)
SURF SCOTER (2m, 2f " )
RUDDY DUCK (alt m, " )
BUFFLEHEAD (continuing at HHP)
COMMON LOON (basic, off Candlestick point, continuing summering bird) )
PELAGIC CORMORANT (2 at end of Heron's Head pier)
BLACK OYSTERCATCHERS (6 flying together high over Candlestick Rec area then Yosemite Slough then out over bay, a 7th was on Double Rock, another pair was at HHP along with the now nearly full grown chick)
BLACK-NECKED STILT (incubating, HHP)
MARBLED GODWIT (HHP, very worn, likely summering locally)
LONG-BILLED CURLEW (2, HHP)
WHITE-THROATED SWIFT (2 over Bayview Hill, never confirmed but suspected of breeding in the area)

SAVANNAH SPARROW (2, HHP a good distance apart could represent two separate territories and possibly breeding here, one was singing repeatedly. I also heard a probable 3rd Savannah Sparrow giving chips from some bunchgrasses in the Candlestick Parking lot that is due to be developed for condos in the future)

There was a Common Buckeye butterfly in the Candlestick lot as well.

There has been much talk in recent months on SFBirds about Nuttall's White-crowned Sparrow (our endemic breeding sub-species) and efforts to restore their breeding habitat in Golden Gate Park and other parts of the city. However Bryant's Savannah Sparrow (a California species of special concern) has been entirely ignored it seems. In contrast to the White-crown of which there are dozens if not hundreds of breeding pairs left in the city, the Savannah Sparrow is down to a handful of breeding pairs at most and its habitat is imperiled by proposed "re-development" of the baylands in southeast San Francisco.

Good birding,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


6/27/10 : breeding notes etc. in the SE

Dominik Mosur
 

Did a tour of the Southeast side of the city this morning (7:10 - 10:30 a.m.) starting at Bayview Hill - Candlestick SRA - Yosemite Slough/Double Rock - Heron's Head/India Basin finishing with 54 total species (a pretty good total for the area covered considering the time of year.)

Most interesting was the presence of a female LAZULI BUNTING with a begging juvenile in tow on the steep grassy hillside on the Southwest side of Bayview Hill. I hadn't noted this species here since mid-May although Adam Winer did have a female on the hill 6/13/10/, but it appears that they pulled of a successful breeding attempt.

Other stuff of local interest:

GREATER SCAUP (m,f in the Bay off Double Rock)
SURF SCOTER (2m, 2f " )
RUDDY DUCK (alt m, " )
BUFFLEHEAD (continuing at HHP)
COMMON LOON (basic, off Candlestick point, continuing summering bird) )
PELAGIC CORMORANT (2 at end of Heron's Head pier)
BLACK OYSTERCATCHERS (6 flying together high over Candlestick Rec area then Yosemite Slough then out over bay, a 7th was on Double Rock, another pair was at HHP along with the now nearly full grown chick)
BLACK-NECKED STILT (incubating, HHP)
MARBLED GODWIT (HHP, very worn, likely summering locally)
LONG-BILLED CURLEW (2, HHP)
WHITE-THROATED SWIFT (2 over Bayview Hill, never confirmed but suspected of breeding in the area)

SAVANNAH SPARROW (2, HHP a good distance apart could represent two separate territories and possibly breeding here, one was singing repeatedly. I also heard a probable 3rd Savannah Sparrow giving chips from some bunchgrasses in the Candlestick Parking lot that is due to be developed for condos in the future)

There was a Common Buckeye butterfly in the Candlestick lot as well.

There has been much talk in recent months on SFBirds about Nuttall's White-crowned Sparrow (our endemic breeding sub-species) and efforts to restore their breeding habitat in Golden Gate Park and other parts of the city. However Bryant's Savannah Sparrow (a California species of special concern) has been entirely ignored it seems. In contrast to the White-crown of which there are dozens if not hundreds of breeding pairs left in the city, the Savannah Sparrow is down to a handful of breeding pairs at most and its habitat is imperiled by proposed "re-development" of the baylands in southeast San Francisco.

Good birding,
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco


Re: Early Migrants At Crissy Field?

Dominik Mosur
 

And then there are the few that seem to oversummer locally as well

On Jun 24, 2010, at 7:26 AM, "David_Assmann" <david_assmann@...> wrote:

There were three LONG BILLED CURLEWS at Crissy Field yesterday.


Re: Early Migrants At Crissy Field?

Dominik Mosur
 

Shorebirds begin arriving in our area as early as mid June so these wouldn't be considered early at all.

On Jun 24, 2010, at 7:26 AM, "David_Assmann" <david_assmann@...> wrote:

There were three LONG BILLED CURLEWS at Crissy Field yesterday.







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Early Migrants At Crissy Field?

David Assmann
 

There were three LONG BILLED CURLEWS at Crissy Field yesterday.


Bats Stern Grove

fun_light_witty <cobra1976@...>
 

Last Sunday,at dusk, I went looking for bats at Stern Grove. Facing West looking towards Pine Lake in the open dog walking area, I saw in the tree line above and and the edges in what appeared to be bats. I'm so used to bats being more in the open and flying close to the ground and water. What I have read these might be Mexican Free Tailed Bats. The viewing of the was not vey long and there were only a few of them.


One-timer?

redhead94109 <redhead94109@...>
 

That Rose-breasted Grosbeak was probably a one-timer. I looked twice
yesterday and once today and saw no sign of it. But by accident I DID
find a Black Phoebe nest. The nest is in some sort of slot in the
building which abuts Lafayette Park on the south side, near Clay/Gough.
Pat McCulloch


Gray Catbirds on San Bruno Mountain

Jessie Raeder
 

Though this posting not in San Francisco City/County proper, I thought it
would likely be of interest to folks here. Two Gray Catbirds have been
spotted for several days now on San Bruno Mountain (see original post copied
below). They were still present this morning at 8am - I saw them with 3 or
4 others who have posted details on the Peninsula Birds list today. Despite
less than ideal conditions (I would describe it as dripping fog) they were
still active and very visible from the trail!

Jessie Raeder
San Francisco, CA

On Tue, Jun 22, 2010 at 2:47 PM, Joseph Morlan <jmorlan@...> wrote:



The two Gray Catbirds continue on San Bruno Mountain; yes there are two
singing male Gray Catbirds along the Old Guadalupe Trail and both birds
have apparently been present since Sunday when first found by Herb Brandt.

We met Herb along the trail late this morning and he pointed out that there
was a second Gray Catbird about 50 meters along the trail beyond the first
bird. Just continue east along the paved trail past the isolated clump of
eucalyptus to the next opening. The second bird was also singing and
skulking in the yellow flowering acacias and in the low blackberry tangles.
The second bird was easier to see for us and I managed a distant photo.
Robbie obtained voice recordings of both birds. Photo and voice recordings
are at:

http://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/newgallery.htm<http://fog.ccsf.edu/%7Ejmorlan/newgallery.htm>

Herb says the birds are most cooperative early in the morning, before 10am
or late in the afternoon after 5pm. Otherwise they tend to hide deep in
the vegetation.

Access is easiest from the Crocker Gate in Daly City. Detailed directions
have been posted at:

http://www.sialia.com/s/calists.pl?rm=message;id=368419
http://www.sialia.com/s/calists.pl?rm=message;id=368399
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA jmorlan (at) ccsf.edu
SF Birding Classes start Sep 14 http://fog.ccsf.edu/jmorlan/
California Bird Records Committee http://www.californiabirds.org/
Western Field Ornithologists http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Help! What to do with a baby bird

SuperK
 

#1, Keep the bird warm! Put him in a small box stuffed with facial tissue or a soft towel-preferably one without loops--like a clean, cotton kitchen towel. The birds delicate toes could get stuck in the terrycloth loops of a normal bath. towel. No food or water. Keep him in a dark, quiet place-no radios or talking around the bird.

If he isn't injured  or can't be put back in the nest, #2, Drive him up to WildCare in San Rafael. Go now, don't wait until tomorrow morning. Dinner can wait! They're open late right now for exactly this reason. Someone is there until 7pm at least, maybe later. The front door might be locked but there's an intercom with printed instructions next to it. Call first or on the way.

WildCare is located at 76 Albert Park Lane, San Rafael: take 101 N to the central San Rafael exit, turn left on 3rd St., (2nd light), go about 8 blocks, turn left on B St., go about 4 blocks, turn left on Albert Park Ln. (after the Safeway). WildCare is about half way down the drive, there's a footbridge on the right. 415-456-SAVE

Call WildCare at 415-456-SAVE(7283). Operators are available from 9am to 5pm, 365 days a year.
After 5pm PST (Pacific Standard Time), call the 24-hour Nightline at 415-300-6359.

Here are excellent reference sheets on what to do when you find baby birds or mammals;

Birds:http://www.tracyaviary.org/uploads/I%20Found%20A%20Baby%20Bird.pdf
http://www.wildcarebayarea.org/site/DocServer/Found_a_Bird_revised.pdf?docID=2501

Mammals: http://www.thewildlifecenter.org/caring_for_baby_mammals.pdf

And here's a list of licensed wildlife rehabbers by state: http://www.wildcarebayarea.org/site/DocServer/otherrehabbers_correction_4-28-10.html?docID=381


Help! What to do with a baby bird

lilhormiguita <lilhormiguita@...>
 

I just got a call from my boss whose daughter found a baby bird on the sidewak. She was afraid it might get stepped on and ultimately decided to take it home. Now she's wondering what to do with it.

Suggestions??? They live near Kaiser on Geary.

Thanks in advance,

Jennifer


Looking for field guide donation for budding Colombian Ornithologists

lilhormiguita <lilhormiguita@...>
 

In the spirt of birding and social justice, I'm wondering if anyone would be willing to donate gently used field guides for a couple of budding Colombian Ornithologists in Bogota. Colombia is an extremely stratified society and while these youngsters graduated earlier this year from a public university with a degrees in Biology and a specialization in Ornithology ,as lower middle class Colmbians who are not well connected, their future is bleak.

I happened to meet them at an Ornithological Conference in Colombia 2 years ago and have since helped be the conduit to get them scopes and binos for the field work they completed earlier this year. It's frustrating to see such passionate, talented young people with such limited opportunities to apply thier formal education and practice thier passion in their own country.

They are in part the inspiration for me to found Anidar ("To Nest" in Spanish)a small business/social venture to donate to underfunded bird conservation efforts in Latin America as well as provide monitary & logistical assistance to individuals such as the youngsters mentioned above to get further training/field work in bird conservation.

A friend is traveling to Colombia next week and I would love to send a couple of field guides for them. Their specific requests included Pyle, Sibley and Restall.

Please feel free to contact me off list if you can offer any guidance in setting up a small scale social venture. I'm a single mom with limited time, and knowlege in setting up a such an entity, but this undertaking will enable me to marry my love of birds, social/environmental justice and Latin America.

Cheers!

Jennifer


Re: Heron's Head Black Oystercatcher chick

Alan Hopkins
 

They do seem to be reproducing along the Bay. I have never seen a nest but young have been appearing for quite a few years now. They may nest on the old pier at Heron's Head, if they nest at Double Rock they nest where I can't see the nest but I've suspected that that's a spot. There were no Oystercatchers when I atlased the area in 1990. I was a pair along the shore at Arrowhead Marsh a few weeks back. I think the invasion of zebra clams has benefited them. The pair at the Cliff house appeared to have a chick. It was too small to see but the adult appeared to be tending it.
 
Alan Hopkins

--- On Mon, 6/21/10, Mark Eaton <marksffo@...> wrote:


From: Mark Eaton <marksffo@...>
Subject: Re: [SFBirds] Heron's Head Black Oystercatcher chick
To: "marybetlach" <betlack@...>
Cc: SFBirds@...
Date: Monday, June 21, 2010, 9:43 PM


 



I should know this, but are there are other bay-side records for BLOY
nesting? I know about the birds that nested off the Cliff House and
there's a record for Alcatraz as well. Double Rock, perhaps?

Sigh,
Mark

On Mon, Jun 21, 2010 at 2:13 PM, marybetlach <betlack@...> wrote:
I walked Heron's Head at lunchtime today. It was pretty quiet there.
I didn't see the Harlequin duck today. There was a Willet transitioning to breeding plumage. There were 2-3 newly minted Avocet chicks being tended to by nervous parents in the southern ponds.  Best of all was a Black Oystercatcher feeding a youngster on the concrete pier north of Heron's Head. This action was occurring in full view at the end of the pier on the part where the concrete slopes into the water. The youngster was about ½ to 2/3 the size of the parent and had a brownish bill, unlike the bright orange of its parents. Perhaps it's the chick that Eddie Bartley spotted several weeks ago. It is encouraging that it has managed to evade the nearby gulls that inhabit the pier thus far.


Mary Betlach





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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Heron's Head Black Oystercatcher chick

Mark Eaton
 

I should know this, but are there are other bay-side records for BLOY
nesting? I know about the birds that nested off the Cliff House and
there's a record for Alcatraz as well. Double Rock, perhaps?

Sigh,
Mark

On Mon, Jun 21, 2010 at 2:13 PM, marybetlach <betlack@...> wrote:
I walked Heron's Head at lunchtime today. It was pretty quiet there.
I didn't see the Harlequin duck today. There was a Willet transitioning to breeding plumage. There were 2-3 newly minted Avocet chicks being tended to by nervous parents in the southern ponds.  Best of all was a Black Oystercatcher feeding a youngster on the concrete pier north of Heron's Head. This action was occurring in full view at the end of the pier on the part where the concrete slopes into the water. The youngster was about ½ to 2/3 the size of the parent and had a brownish bill, unlike the bright orange of its parents. Perhaps it's the chick that Eddie Bartley spotted several weeks ago. It is encouraging that it has managed to evade the nearby gulls that inhabit the pier thus far.


Mary Betlach





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