210919, The "EMCOMM Hub" on Keller Sunday at 2000 hours (PST), "September is Preparedness Month" with Rick, KK6CTT


Rick KK6CTT
 
Edited

  Mission Statement for the "EMCOMM Hub" on Keller:  

"Provide a networking environment that fosters sound Keller Peak Repeater practices with respect to emergency communications and preparedness."

o  All amateur radio operators are invited to participate.
o  To follow along you can find tonight's outline at hub.rivecg.net along with many past topics/information for reference.

For operational guidance; always refer to the KPRA guidelines found here:  http://kpra.net/guidelines.html


NOTE:  If you would like to be a featured guest who has an organization that meets the net criteria and you would like to highlight it in a subsequent net, please open a dialog with Rick, KK6CTT at rngr86@...  Please put "EMCOMM Hub" in the subject line for easy identification.

Scope
:

  • Facilitate education and training that draws willing amateur radio operators to serve as stewards of the Keller Peak emergency communications community.  Become "The Hub" of information that prepares us to efficiently recognize and adjust to situations where proper handling of priority and emergency traffic is necessary.
  • Allow groups and individuals who participate in emergency communications and preparedness to share their experiences while providing opportunities for operators to volunteer with the organizations that provide the best fit.
  • Establish sound practices within the Keller Peak Repeater Association that recognizes and addresses the "greater good" principle in the eventuality the repeater becomes "The Hub" of emergency communication operations.
  • Flow of the net will include the following but will remain flexible:
    • Any updates from KE6RYZ, Dennis concerning the repeater.
    • Guest speaker(s) sharing personal, agency or organization information (see "scope of this net"):
      • Personal experience due to an event or personal knowledge based on work/volunteer experience.
      • Governmental or Nongovernmental organization (NGO) viewpoint.
      • Or, the club frame of reference.
    • Public Service Announcement:
      • Wrap up with something relative to the group that ends the net on a positive note.
Frequently heard courtesy tones on the repeater:
  • Dah Dit Dit Dit (- . . .):  "B" signifies the repeater is running on back-up power:
    • "Routine" QSOs should be avoided.
    • Brief "Priority" and "Emergency" traffic may be passed which may include directing operators to another repeater or simplex net.
    • Net controllers please refrain from conducting roll calls and use the net to share or exchange only important information.
  • Dah Dah Dit (- - .):  The "G" tone identifies power is derived through onsite generator backup power:
    • "Routine" QSOs should be avoided.
    • Brief "Priority" and "Emergency" traffic may be passed which may include directing operators to another repeater or simplex net.
    • Net controllers please refrain from conducting roll calls and use the net to share or exchange only important information.
  • Dah Dit Dah (- . -):  The "K" tone signifies the repeater has dropped and is awaiting the next station.
  • Dah Dit (- .):  The "N" signifies the repeater is in "net" mode.  This may include automatically or manually linked reflectors/nodes.
Check-ins
  • IRLP and EchoLink Check-ins:  Call, Name & Location
  • RF Check-ins:  Blocks of 5 calls:  Call, Name & Location
    • We will:
      • Check-in participants as we get comments, questions and suggestions.
      • Ask for check-ins at the end of the net (time permitting).

 "September is Preparedness Month" with Rick, KK6CTT 

I.   Announcements:
  • Nets to come in the near future:
    • Join Yvette, KD6ESZ on 09/26/21 as she reaches out to the female operators in the group in the hopes of bringing their view points concerning emergency communications and preparedness.
    • Then, a week later, join Ray, N6KZM on 10/03/21 as he shares his experience with remote operations (power issues) and his journey researching "power stations" also called "solar generators."
  • Licensing and testing:
    • Amateur License Testing, every 2nd Tuesdays of the month 0800, $15 Exam fee
      • American Legion Post 426, Yucaipa, 12167 California St. TO REGISTER send Email to WD6H@...
    • General Class Ham Cram session: (KD7UA, Chuck) On September 5 and 19, the Yucaipa Valley Amateur Radio Club with testing on the 19th. We have a number of people with Technician licenses and we are trying to help encourage them to move on to the General Class License. Contact Chuck KD7UA@...
  • Great ShakeOut Plans?
    • West Riverside County ARES:
      • 21 OCT 21, 10:30, check-in net.
      • 23 OCT 21, 0900-1030, information continues to trickle in.
        • All operators welcome to participate
        • Will provide and example of "meeting" on Keller, providing status and moving to a resource net based on area and activity.
        • Other operational expanded exercise tasks.
  • Local Tech Net on the W6JBT Repeater:  https://w6jbt.org/
    • Each weekday morning we have the “Tech Net” held on our two meter repeater from 7:00 am to 8:00 am. This net is designed to bring local hams together and talk of radio issues, new products, questions and answers about everything “ham” related. It also can be reached on the Echolink side of the repeater under W6JBT -R.
  • Need more net time?  We've had some good reports of a welcoming repeater further west that holds two weekday nets at 0900 and 2100 hours on the Catalina Repeater:  http://www.cara.radio/
  • Any other announcements?  Please send them to Rick, rngr86@... if you would like to make an announcement during the net.
  • Dedicated to the 13, killed on 13 AUG 2021:
    • Sgt. Johanny Rosario Pichardo, 25, of Lawrence, Massachusetts, assigned to 5th Marine Expeditionary Brigade, Naval Support Activity Bahrain.
    • Sgt. Nicole L. Gee, 23, of Sacramento, California, assigned to Combat Logistics Battalion 24, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, II Marine
    • Staff Sgt. Darin T. Hoover, 31, of Salt Lake City, Utah.
    • Cpl. Hunter Lopez, 22, of Indio, California, a rifleman.
    • Cpl. Daegan W. Page, 23, of Omaha, Nebraska, a rifleman.
    • Cpl. Humberto A. Sanchez, 22, of Logansport, Indiana, a rifleman.
    • Lance Cpl. David L. Espinoza, 20, of Rio Bravo, Texas, a rifleman.
    • Lance Cpl. Jared M. Schmitz, 20, of St. Charles, Missouri, a rifleman.
    • Lance Cpl. Rylee J. McCollum, 20, of Jackson, Wyoming, a rifleman.
    • Lance Cpl. Dylan R. Merola, 20, of Rancho Cucamonga, California, a rifleman.
    • Lance Cpl. Kareem M. Nikoui, 20, of Norco, California.
    • Navy Corpsman Maxton W. Soviak, 22, of Berlin Heights, Ohio, assigned to 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, Camp Pendleton, California.
    • SSG Ryan C. Knauss, 23, of Corryton, Tennessee. Knauss was assigned to 9th PSYOP Battalion, 8th PSYOP Group, Ft. Bragg, North Carolina.  Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.
    • Task and Purpose article:  https://taskandpurpose.com/news/marine-corps-abbey-gate-rescue/
    • FAST (Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Team):  https://www.americanspecialops.com/usmc-special-operations/fleet-antiterrorism-security-team/#share


II.  National Preparedness Month:  https://www.ready.gov/september


Week 1 September 1-4:  Make A Plan
  • Talk to your friends and family about how you will communicate before, during, and after a disaster.  Make sure to update your plan based on the Centers for Disease Control recommendations due to the Coronavirus.
Week 2 September 5-11:  Build A Kit
  • Gather supplies that will last for several days after a disaster for everyone living in your home.  Don’t forget to consider the unique needs each person or pet may have in case you have to evacuate quickly.  Update your kits and supplies based on recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control.
Week 3 September 12-18:  Low-Cost, No-Cost Preparedness
  • Natural disasters don’t wait for a convenient time.  Preparing for them shouldn’t wait either. Start today by signing up for alerts, safe-guarding important documents, and taking other low cost and no cost preparedness actions to lessen the impact of disasters and emergencies for you and your family.
Week 4 September 19-25:  Teach Youth About Preparedness
  • Talk to your kids about preparing for emergencies and what to do in case you are separated.  Reassure them by providing information about how they can get involved.
III.  Also, Fall Safety, slide show already made for you here:  https://www.weather.gov/media/wrn/presentations/fall_2021_presentation.pdf


  • Exercise:
  • Drought:  https://www.weather.gov/safety/drought
    • Types of Drought
      • Meteorological drought is based on the degree of dryness (rainfall deficit) and the length of the dry period.
      • Hydrologic drought is based on the impact of rainfall deficits on the water supply such as stream flow, reservoir and lake levels, and ground water table decline.
      • Agricultural drought is based on the impacts to agriculture by factors such as rainfall deficits, soil water deficits, reduced groundwater, or reservoir levels needed for irrigation.
      • Socioeconomic drought is based on the impact of drought conditions (meteorological, agricultural, or hydrological drought) on supply and demand of some economic goods. Socioeconomic drought occurs when the demand for an economic good exceeds supply as a result of a weather-related deficit in water supply.
  • Flood:  https://www.weather.gov/safety/flood
    • Flooding is a coast-to-coast threat to some part of the United States and its territories nearly every day of the year. This site is designed to teach you how to stay safe in a flood event.
    • If you know what to do beforeduring, and after a flood you can increase your chances of survival and better protect your property.  For instance, it is vital to know what to do if you are driving and hit a flooded road.
    • Here you will find an interactive flood map, information describing the different types of flooding and educational material.
    • You will also learn how the National Weather Service keeps you aware of potentially dangerous flooding situations through alerts and warnings.
    • Learn how to better protect yourself and your family by reading our flood survivor stories.
    • If you, or someone you know, have been a victim of a flood, please share your story so we can prevent others from becoming a victim.
    • When you write, please note that NWS has permission to use your story and, if possible, let us know the town and state you were in and the year the event took place.
  • Fog:  https://www.weather.gov/safety/fog
    • Fog, particularly when dense, can be hazardous to drivers, mariners and aviators. Fog contributes to numerous travel accidents every year. Restrictions in visibility resulting from fog can also impact takeoff and landing procedures and requirements for pilots, and can be the cause of weather-related aviation delays.
    • This website offers information on the hazards of dense fog and how to stay safe.
    • If you, or someone you know, have been in a fog related accident, please share your story so we can prevent others from becoming a victim.
    • When you write, please note that NWS has permission to use your story and, if possible, let us know the town and state you were in and the year the event took place.
  • Hurricane:  https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane
    • Hurricanes are among nature's most powerful and destructive phenomena.
    • On average, 12 tropical storms, 6 of which become hurricanes form over the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, or Gulf of Mexico during the hurricane season which runs from June 1 to November 30 each year. In the Central Pacific Ocean, an average of 3 tropical storms, 2 of which become hurricanes form or move over the area during the hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30 each year.
    • Guam, the Northern Marianas and Micronesia experience typhoons all year round but the main season in July through November with a peak from mid-August to mid-September.
    • Over a typical 2-year period, the U.S. coastline is struck by an average of 3 hurricanes, 1 of which is classified as a major hurricane (winds of 111 mph or greater).
    • By knowing what actions to take before the hurricane season begins, when a hurricane approaches,and when the storm is in your area, as well as what to do after a hurricane leaves your area, you can increase your chance of survival.
    • If you, or someone you know, have been a victim of a hurricane, please share your story, including the town and state you were in and the year the event took place.. Please note that NS will then have permission to use your story for educational campaigns.
    • Sharing this information may help save someone’s life in the future.
    • Read stories from survivors and learn how to stay safe.
  • Tsunami:  https://www.weather.gov/safety/tsunami
    • Tsunamis are among Earth's most infrequent hazards. But even though tsunamis do not occur very often, and most are small and nondestructive, they pose a major threat to coastal communities, particularly in the Pacific. A tsunami can strike any ocean coast at any time. There is no season for tsunamis. We cannot predict where, when or how destructive the next tsunami will be. However, while tsunamis cannot be prevented, there are things you can do before, during and after a tsunami that could save your life and the lives of your family and friends. Read these pages to learn about tsunamis and what you can do to keep yourself and your loved ones safe in the event of a tsunami.
  • Wildfire:  https://www.weather.gov/safety/wildfire
    • NOAA's National Weather Service works in conjunction with federal and state wildland managers to protect lives and property in and around America's wildlands. This site will help you prepare, be aware and act early if a wildfire comes your way. A list of partners can be found on the National Interagency Fire Center website. If you, or someone you know, have been a victim of a wildfire, please share your story so we can prevent others from becoming a victim. When you write, please note that NWS has permission to use your story and, if possible, let us know the town and state you were in and the year the event took place.
  • Wind:  https://www.weather.gov/safety/wind
    • High winds can occur during a severe thunderstorm, with a strong weather system, or can flow down a mountain.
    • When winds are sustained at 40-50 mph, isolated wind damage is possible.
    • Widespread significant wind damage can occur with higher wind speeds. During strong thunderstorms, straight line wind speeds can exceed 100 mph. High winds can blow objects around and pose a significant threat to your safety.
    • Understanding the risks can help you prepare for these events.
    • If you, or someone you know, have been a victim of a high wind event, please share your story so we can prevent others from becoming a victim. Read wind survivor stories.
    • When you write, please note that NWS has permission to use your story and, if possible, let us know the town and state you were in and the year the event took place.
  • Winter:  https://www.weather.gov/safety/winter
    • Winter storms can bring snow, sleet, and freezing rain across the entire United States and its territories.
    • Even Hawaii gets snow in its Big Island, and major cities as far south as Atlanta and Dallas have been paralyzed by snow and ice.
    • Blizzards occur when strong wind causes blowing snow and whiteout conditions, making roads impassable.
    • Thousands of people are injured or killed every year in traffic accidents related to slippery roads from winter storms.
    • This website is designed to teach you how to stay safe before, during and after a winter storm. You will find information on winter alerts, science and hazards, snow coverage maps, and information describing the different types of winter storms.
    • If you or someone you know has been a victim of a winter storm, please share your story so we can prevent others from becoming a victim.
    • When you write, please note that the NWS has permission to use your story and, if possible, let us know the town and state you were in and the year the event took place.
    • Read about winter weather survivors.


III.  Final thoughts and PSA:
  • Are You Ready?  Get a very recent guide here:  https://www.ready.gov/sites/default/files/2021-03/are-you-ready-guide.pdf
    • Only 29 pages
    • How to Prepare for Disasters
      • Know your Risks
      • Make a Plan
      • Take Action
  • Basic Protective Actions for all Disasters:
    • These important actions will help keep you prepared for all disasters:
      • Have the skills to assess the situation quickly and to take effective action to protect yourself.
      • Get involved with preparedness training and volunteer programs.
      • Put together an emergency fund of cash and supplies.
      • Decrease the potential impacts of hazards.
      • Prepare a family disaster plan and practice the plan.
 8

  • 1) Assess the situation and 2) "Should I Stay or Should I Go..."
  • Specifics:
    • Active Shooter
    • Avalanche
    • Cyberattack
    • Earthquake
    • Extreme Heat
    • Financial Preparedness
    • Flood
    • Hurricane
    • Landslide
    • Nuclear Explosion
    • Pandemics
    • Power Outage
    • Thunderstorm, Lightning, and Hail
    • Tornado
    • Tsunami
    • Volcano
    • Wildfire
    • Winter Storm
  • Make a Plan...And so much more!
    • Take action
    • Recovering
    • File an Insurance Claim
    • Coping with Disaster
    • Disaster Assistance
    • Protect from Disaster-Related Fraud and Scams
    • Give Support:
      • There are many ways you and your family can offer support to those in need after a disaster. If you can, help your neighbors to restore your community. If possible, donate cash to disaster relief organizations, and be sure to check with local officials before volunteering or donating goods. Children, elderly people, non-native English speakers, people with disabilities, and others with access and functional needs are significantly affected after a disaster may need special care.